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HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM


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Why not pick something off the wall? Especially considering how much some people complain about the "same old stuff" being run. When they can get a chance to run something that's in the "so bad it's fun" genre, go for it!

 

If, for example, you've seen all those old George Raft gangster movies, why not jump at the chance to catch Skidoo, even if he's only got a small part? It's hilariously awful.

 

Ditto for those all-star disasters of the 70s, like The Swarm. Poor Olivia made a lot of better movies, but The Swarm is fun.

 

 

i love this post.  Once I accidentally watched Queen from Outer Space (or something). One of the Gabors was in it (I can't keep them straight).  My son came in the room during it and I told him "this is the best worst movie I've ever seen. It's so bad I can't stop watching it."  Fortunately, life intervened and saved me.

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I feel very strongly that Monday, August 22, 2016 is one of the best single days ever on TCM!

 

The Divorcee (1930) and Faithless (1932) are quite serviceable dramas.
 
The Man in Possession (1931) and When Ladies Meet (1933) are quite nice little comedies.
 
The Mystery of Mr. X (1934) is one of my favorite comedy-crime-romance movies. Robert Montgomery is at his charming "innocent little boy" best. I believe that the scene with him, Elizabeth Allan and the butter is one of the most romantic ever filmed.
 
Hide-Out (1934) is a nice little comedy which is unusually touching. I find it quite precious.
 
Piccadilly Jim (1936) is a manic little comedy. 
 
The Last of Mrs. Cheyney (1937) is quite very wonderful! It would be exceptionally difficult for me to decide of William Powell or Robert Montgomery which is more charming. Frank Morgan, Jessie Ralph and Nigel Bruce are perfect in their roles.
 
Lady in the Lake (1947) has an interesting viewpoint and is a decent little mystery. 
 
Mr. and Mrs. Smith (1941) is a unique little comedy. It is at times playful and at other times manic and at all times charming.
 
Night must Fall (1937) allows Robert Montgomery to show just how charming and endearing a maniac murderer can be. 
 
I could wish that Haunted Honeymoon (1940) had been included on this day but it is airing on August 24, 2016.
 
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i love this post.  Once I accidentally watched Queen from Outer Space (or something). One of the Gabors was in it (I can't keep them straight).  My son came in the room during it and I told him "this is the best worst movie I've ever seen. It's so bad I can't stop watching it."  Fortunately, life intervened and saved me.

 

 

That would be Queen of Outer Space, IIRC.

(I remember seeing the Warner disk with commentary:  Originally, the script was going to be a Ben Hecht 40's-comedy--get it, a planet of females wants to invade the Earth but they forgot their purse and had to go back!--but that wasn't what we got by the time the domestic and rocket-obsessed 50's came along.)

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Monday, August 22

 

Robert Montgomery day.  I’m surprised they don’t have Criterion’s Ride the Pink Horse.

 

9 a.m.  Faithless (1932).  I’ll pick this Montgomery Tallulah Bankhead.  Be warned - it has Hugh Herbert in it.

 
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The Mystery of Mr. X (1934) is one of my favorite comedy-crime-romance movies. Robert Montgomery is at his charming "innocent little boy" best. I believe that the scene with him, Elizabeth Allan and the butter is one of the most romantic ever filmed.

 

I'll be taping this one, because I like the title. I'm glad to see your recommendation.

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Monday, August 22

 

Robert Montgomery day.  I’m surprised they don’t have Criterion’s Ride the Pink Horse.

 

9 a.m.  Faithless (1932).  I’ll pick this Montgomery Tallulah Bankhead.  Be warned - it has Hugh Herbert in it.

 

Thanks for the HH warning.  Still, I will record it.

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Tuesday, August 23

 

Brigitte Bardot day in the U.S.  It’s a hodgepodge of replacements in Canada.

 

10:15 a.m.  The Grand Maneuver (1955).  I’ve read some good things about this.  By Rene Clair with Bardot, Michele Morgan and Gerard Philipe.

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Tuesday, August 23

 

Brigitte Bardot day in the U.S.  It’s a hodgepodge of replacements in Canada.

 

10:15 a.m.  The Grand Maneuver (1955).  I’ve read some good things about this.  By Rene Clair with Bardot, Michele Morgan and Gerard Philipe.

 

Bardot films were replaced???    Even in Quebec? 

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Tuesday, August 23rd; Brigitte Bardot day.  All times E.S.T.:

 

8:00 a.m. "Helen of Troy" (1955)--This one because trailer looks good and is crystal clear, and because it looks better than its' Maltin rating.

 

12:15 p.m. "Spirits of the Dead" (1969)--Trilogy of Poe stories sounds fascinating.  Roger Vadim directed the first story, an adaptation of "Metzengerstein".  Second story is an adaptation of "William Wilson", and was directed by Louis Malle (this is the story Bardot is in).  Third story is an adaptation of "Never Bet The Devil Your Head", and was directed by Federico Fellini.  Second and third stories are supposed to be the best.

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Tuesday, August 23

 

Brigitte Bardot day in the U.S.  It’s a hodgepodge of replacements in Canada.

 

10:15 a.m.  The Grand Maneuver (1955).  I’ve read some good things about this.  By Rene Clair with Bardot, Michele Morgan and Gerard Philipe.

I'm really looking forward to this one. Gerard Philipe and Michele Morgan were also icons of French cinema, gorgeous movie stars who could act.

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Tuesday, August 23rd; Brigitte Bardot day.  All times E.S.T.:

 

8:00 a.m. "Helen of Troy" (1955)--This one because trailer looks good and is crystal clear, and because it looks better than its' Maltin rating.

 

12:15 p.m. "Spirits of the Dead" (1969)--Trilogy of Poe stories sounds fascinating.  Roger Vadim directed the first story, an adaptation of "Metzengerstein".  Second story is an adaptation of "William Wilson", and was directed by Louis Malle (this is the story Bardot is in).  Third story is an adaptation of "Never Bet The Devil Your Head", and was directed by Federico Fellini.  Second and third stories are supposed to be the best.

 

Spirits of the Dead is worth a look, if just for the last Fellini segment, with Terence Stamp. As for the other 2 parts, I recall Jane Fonda's costume in the first part (yowza), but nothing about the second part.

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Tuesday, August 23rd; Brigitte Bardot day.  All times E.S.T.:

2:15 p.m. "Spirits of the Dead" (1969)--Trilogy of Poe stories sounds fascinating.  Roger Vadim directed the first story, an adaptation of "Metzengerstein".  Second story is an adaptation of "William Wilson", and was directed by Louis Malle (this is the story Bardot is in).  Third story is an adaptation of "Never Bet The Devil Your Head", and was directed by Federico Fellini.  Second and third stories are supposed to be the best.

 

 

The Fellini segment is a bit.....loose when it comes to Poe.

The original story is basically the title, but Fellini has it narrated by a bored 60's teen-star on a Fellini-esque version of an entertainment talkshow, so the entertainment-satire is pretty much his early first-draft for "Ginger & Fred".

 

And it's not the "1/2" in Fellini's "8-1/2", since it's really 1/3.

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Oh, and tomorrow I'm recording The Rains of Ranchipur, but not from TCM!

 

I've heard it is an amazing movie, with a tremendous script, and world-class acting. <_<

 

This is a fine film but it doesn't have Claude or Bette.   

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LawrenceA--Bardot wears an ugly black wig in the second part of Spirits of the Dead (SOTD); as for the rest, if you remember the plot of "William Wilson", you know what that part of SOTD is about.

 

BTW, Rains of Ranchipur did get an Oscar nomination for its' Special Effects.

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Tomorrow, August 24, is Constance Cummings day. I don't think I could pick her out of a lineup, but I'm recording several films during her spotlight.

 

Haunted Honeymoon (1940) 7:30 AM EST, co-starring Robert Montgomery. It sounds fun.

 

The Mind Reader (1933) 9:00 AM EST, co-starring Warren William. It also sounds like fun.

 

American Madness (1932) 11:15 PM EST, co-starring Walter Huston, directed by Frank Capra. I'm recording it for those two.

 

The Criminal Code (1931) 4:15 AM EST, also with Walter Huston, directed this time by Howard Hawks. I'm recording it for them, as well as Boris Karloff.

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I've never heard of Constance Cummings, but I'm going to record Haunted Honeymoon as well, this is solely based on Sans wishing it had been scheduled during Robert Montgomery's day.

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So happy that Constance Cummings is getting some attention on the 24th.  Don't miss the premieres of In the Cool of the Day, Broadway Thru a Keyhole, Night After Night, and Doomed Cargo aka Seven Sinners.  Doomed Cargo is well worth watching.  It's a mystery- a bit like The 39 Steps.  Watch it if you like train films.

 

I'm posting a scan of sheet music from Broadway Thru a Keyhole.  One of my favorite songs from the

30s is "Doin' the Uptown Lowdown".

htbcs3.jpg

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I have two versions of TCM with my local cable company.  HD and SD.  This afternoon I recorded The Night Heaven Fell on the HD TCM channel and the subtitles were outside the field of vision.  You could barely see the tops of the letters at the bottom of the screen.

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I've never heard of Constance Cummings, but I'm going to record Haunted Honeymoon as well, this is solely based on Sans wishing it had been scheduled during Robert Montgomery's day.

 

what i saw of it was really cute...although it was slow to get going. great sets and Montgomery is really at ease in his role.

Cat steals film.

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this has been mentioned by others, but here goes (copied and pasted from the schedule)

**note: MALTIN GIVES IT TWO STARS, probably worth catching although, I dunno, George Raft though....

 

 

LEONARD MALTIN REVIEW:    

D: Archie Mayo. George Raft, Mae West, Constance Cummings, Wynne Gibson, Roscoe Karns, Louis Calhern, Alison Skipworth. Story of nightclub owner Raft's infatuation with "classy'' Cummings is a crashing bore, but when Mae West comes on the screen lights up. It's her film debut, and she's in rare form.

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in primetime tonight, THIS sounded the most interesting to me.............

 

"Seven Sinners was worthy of Hitchcock. "On its own merits it is a crisp, humorous and deftly turned murder mystery in which Hollywood's Edmund Lowe and Constance Cummings lead an English cast through an exciting investigation of the strange case of the carnival corpse, the Nice-Paris express wreck, and the vague purposes of a reform group called the Pilgrims of Peace. [...]The investigation is ingenious, the quarry interesting, the motives strange and the denouement surprising. One has no right to ask for more..."

 

-from TCM article

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Thursday, August 25

 

Van Johnson day.  Recipient of a few Harvard Lampoon acting awards.  Poor guy.  But is there is an award for doing all 24 hours?

 

8 p.m.  Battleground (1949).  This one isn’t too bad.

 
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I like quite a few of the Van Johnson films scheduled for tomorrow:

 

High Barbaree - one of the best WWII romances.

 

Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo - a good WWII film

 

The Last Time I Saw Paris  - Expansion of a great F. Scott Fitzgerald short story, "Babylon Revisited." Elizabeth Taylor is the beautiful heroine who seems to be falling apart.

 

Battleground - a classic WWII film, with Ricardo Montalban as the guy who's never seen snow. It's the Battle of the Bulge in winter. He's going to see a lot of it.

 

Miracle in the Rain - Jane Wyman is outstanding as the mother-dominated young woman who meets GI Van Johnson. If you like women's pictures--make that "domestic melodramas"--this one is recommended. Despite the supernatural overtones at the end, there's nothing romantic about the day-to-day life of this hard-working secretary.

 

Invitation - I don't like this one quite so much as the others, but Bronislau Kaper's music is great. It's the same great theme from A Life of Her Own. A rich man pays Van Johnson to court his shy, less than beautiful daughter (Dorothy McGuire).

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