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HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM


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I probably won't be able to catch either Operator 13 (1934) or Another Face (1935) on tomorrow morning. Too bad. They look entertaining to me, particularly the latter. Anyone seen 'em?

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I probably won't be able to catch either Operator 13 (1934) or Another Face (1935) on tomorrow morning. Too bad. They look entertaining to me, particularly the latter. Anyone seen 'em?

Personally I have seen neither but I recorded them the last time around and they are waiting for me.  My guess is that they are fairly regular on TCM.

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Wednesday, June 10/11

 

Richard Carlson fans may wish to check out White Cargo (1942) at 5:15 a.m.  Hedy Lamarr drives everyone mad with lust in this one.

It takes awhile for the men to get acclimatized to her.

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I hope no one was disappointed in my recommendation of Man Hunt last night. I think it's a pretty good movie where the principals do a great job in their roles. In fact I feel like it's one of Walter Pidgeon's best as the leading man.

 

I sure wasn't disappointed.  I enjoy Man Hunt, even if it is a bit convoluted.  And, how about that background music, with A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square playing?   Nice.  And George Sanders as a Nazi sure got his in the end.

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It takes awhile for the men to get acclimatized to her.

I love that line. That word is to Walter Pidgeon what all the British words with the extra "u"'s are to Dargo. I picture Dargo reacting as Pidgeon does.

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This week's highlight movie starts in less than two hours:  Mean Streets.  This was the breakthrough movie for both Martin Scorsese and Harvey Keitel, as well as being Robert De Niro's first great role as a borderline psychopath.   It took a long time for TCM to get around to it, but since they also showed it a year ago maybe they'll eventually make it a regular feature and put it in the prime time spot that it deserves.

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I'm recording Zenobia, which is on this afternoon. I've never seen it -- it sounds pleasantly odd. And stars Hardy without Laurel, which is rare. Any opinions about the film?

 

 

 

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Yes:  Zenobia (1939) is a pleasant farce with a comedy dream cast (Oliver Hardy, Harry Langdon, Billie Burke (champion ditherer of all time, IMO), Hattie McDaniel, & Stephen Fetchit) plus the obligatory ingenue and suitor.  Ingenue announces she's getting married, town veterinarian (Hardy) goes to treat a sick elephant  (Zenobia), & elephant then refuses to leave him.  Complications ensue.  Amusing film.  Definitely worth a look.

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Yes:  Zenobia (1939) is a pleasant farce with a comedy dream cast (Oliver Hardy, Harry Langdon, Billie Burke (champion ditherer of all time, IMO), Hattie McDaniel, & Stephen Fetchit) plus the obligatory ingenue and suitor.  Ingenue announces she's getting married, town veterinarian (Hardy) goes to treat a sick elephant  (Zenobia), & elephant then refuses to leave him.  Complications ensue.  Amusing film.  Definitely worth a look.

Enjoy.  We're just not ready for Zenobia in Canada I'm afraid.  We're getting Racing Lady (1937) which has been on a zillion times.

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Another Face sounds interesting.

Whoda thunk? Figure the odds.

 

Barbara Stanwyck, supposedly a talented actor, Gene Raymond, Ned Sparks, Robert Young, Helen Broderick, all outstanding actors in one picture, and Brian Donlevy in another, and both stunk so bad they were beyond bearable.

 

Perhaps that should be a topic.

 

How DO pictures with the best talent in the world turn out SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO badly?

 

P.

 

and

 

U.

 

Another Face and The Bride Walks Out, in case you were wondering. Burn your DVDs, if you wasted space on these two pieces of garbage. 

 

And yet, hilariously, Hangmen Also Die isn't appreciated. Go figure.

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Thursday, June 11

 

6:45 a.m.  I’m not sure which version of Orson Welles’ Mr. Arkadin TCM will be showing but I will be recording this anyway.

 

It is followed by the ridiculous Man of La Mancha

 

I’m keen to see Love and Pain and the Whole Damn Thing (1973) at 11:00.  It sounds vaguely familiar.

 
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For those who love silly melodramas:

 

White Cargo (1942) with Hedy Lamarr as tropical temptress Tondelayo, complete with Viennese accent that comes and goes.  Tondelayo drives men to drink & murder.  Based on a 1923 play.  Great fun.  Was a major hit for MGM, despite the reviews.  Scheduled for 5:15 a.m. Thursday. (WC is last movie on Wed. page.)

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I’m keen to see Love and Pain and the Whole Damn Thing (1973) at 11:00.  It sounds vaguely familiar.

 

I saw the second half of that film a couple years ago when it was shown on Maggie Smith's SUTS day. I've wanted to see the rest of it since. Too bad it's not on in prime time. I haven't seen a lot of romances that I like very much, really, but this one was odd enough to hold my interest, even if it was a bit on the sentimental side. Good performances. I particularly liked Emiliano Redondo (?) in a strange bit toward the end.

 

Also enjoyed the heck out of Mr. Arkadin when I saw it just this last month. Really indulgent and stylish, really fun. I think they showed the the posthumously edited, 106min version, last time, and I reckon this will be the same.

 

And lastly, Cimarron is worth having on for a few minutes just for Richard Dix's hilarious performance. I really don't know how he kept it up for the whole film.

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I'm a huge fan of Richard Dix and I like him in Cimarron, better than bland Glenn Ford in the remake. In fact, I came here to recommend the whole evening of his films tomorrow starting at 8 pm. Three westerns and three aviation films. I haven't seen The Arizonian or Men Against the Sky so I plan to DVR those, but I like him so if anyone reading this is a fan too I hope you'll try to catch a couple of them.

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I haven't seen a whole lot of Richard Dix's films. Among his films on tomorrow I have the most interest in The Lost Squadron. Didn't mean to diss him with my comment about Cimarron (I didn't watch a lot of the film and can't really comment on it), though I thought he was hammish and entertaining to watch. Much prefer him to anything I've seen Glenn Ford do.

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I'm a huge fan of Richard Dix and I like him in Cimarron, better than bland Glenn Ford in the remake. In fact, I came here to recommend the whole evening of his films tomorrow starting at 8 pm. Three westerns and three aviation films. I haven't seen The Arizonian or Men Against the Sky so I plan to DVR those, but I like him so if anyone reading this is a fan too I hope you'll try to catch a couple of them.

 

I like that early Cimarron. I remember really being drawn into it. Richard Dix is fine in that. I've read some negative opinions about that movie and Richard Dix in particular and I don't think it really registered with me, because I couldn't buy it. That Cimarron is quite an extravagant production for  as early as 1931. I don't remember a lot from the movie (Irene Dunn, yes?) but that horse race scene with the future homesteaders fairly knocked me out. I may have a look at those tomorrow's offerings, thanks for the heads up.

 

EDIT: My comment about negative reviews was not regarding any posts from this thread. I haven't read some of the latest posts, just to be clear. I'm thinking of a particular review from somewhere long ago, thanks.

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I haven't seen a whole lot of Richard Dix's films. Among his films on tomorrow I have the most interest in The Lost Squadron. Didn't mean to diss him with my comment about Cimarron (I didn't watch a lot of the film and can't really comment on it), though I thought he was hammish and entertaining to watch. Much prefer him to anything I've seen Glenn Ford do.

His un-westerns are excellent for those who like Richard Dix.

 

I guess audiences back then liked him in westerns, for some reason, and they kept him at it.

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I like that early Cimarron. I remember really being drawn into it. Richard Dix is fine in that. I've read some negative opinions about that movie and Richard Dix in particular and I don't think it really registered with me, because I couldn't buy it. That Cimarron is quite an extravagant production for  as early as 1931. I don't remember a lot from the movie (Irene Dunn, yes?) but that horse race scene with the future homesteaders fairly knocked me out. I may have a look at those tomorrow's offerings, thanks for the heads up.

 

EDIT: My comment about negative reviews was not regarding any posts from this thread.

 

 

lafitte--Cimarron (1931) is well worth watching, IMO.  It won the 1931 Oscar for best film (not that that is an automatic sign of a great film, but usually a sign of a film worth seeing once).  Irene Dunne is the best part of the film, IMO--the race for homesteads a close second.  Dix is OK in this film.

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lafitte--Cimarron (1931) is well worth watching, IMO.  It won the 1931 Oscar for best film (not that that is an automatic sign of a great film, but usually a sign of a film worth seeing once).  Irene Dunne is the best part of the film, IMO--the race for homesteads a close second.  Dix is OK in this film.

 

Dunne is often the best part of any film.    Have to agree with you about Cimarron and Dix being OK.   (which is like saying 'not so bad' which doesn't mean good either!).

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Friday, June 12

 

7:30 a.m.  Another screening of Preminger’s Laura (1944)  There has been much discussion lately about its alternate ending.

 

5 p.m.  This is the one for me.  Deadline at Dawn (1946) with Susan Hayward.  I’ve never seen it.

 
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Friday, June 12

 

7:30 a.m.  Another screening of Preminger’s Laura (1944)  There has been much discussion lately about its alternate ending.

 

5 p.m.  This is the one for me.  Deadline at Dawn (1946) with Susan Hayward.  I’ve never seen it.

 

Same here with regards to Deadline at Dawn.    I didn't notice that this was a noir that TCM was showing in the series that I hadn't seen.    But unlike what I did with Women on the Run,  I'm not going to read about the film in my noir book Film Noir (Silver \ Ward).   I did look up who directed the film and who was cast but stopped after that (which was very hard to do!).

 

PS:  Love your avatar photo.   But at the same time it is kind of creepy.   

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Same here with regards to Deadline at Dawn.    I didn't notice that this was a noir that TCM was showing in the series that I hadn't seen.    But unlike what I did with Women on the Run,  I'm not going to read about the film in my noir book Film Noir (Silver \ Ward).   I did look up who directed the film and who was cast but stopped after that (which was very hard to do!).

 

PS:  Love your avatar photo.   But at the same time it is kind of creepy.   

Thanks.  Doc says the bandages stay on for a few weeks then it will be a new me.

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It takes awhile for the men to get acclimatized to her.

 

I love that line. That word is to Walter Pidgeon what all the British words with the extra "u"'s are to Dargo. I picture Dargo reacting as Pidgeon does.

 

White Cargo is one of my favorite low-end movies.  That one warrants dim lights and a beer (if you drink).

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