Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM


Recommended Posts

Monday, May 29th; One I haven't seen before, one reliably absurd favorite.  All times E.S.T.:

 

7:45 a.m. "Operation Crossbow" (1965)--This one I've never seen.

 

2:30 p.m.  "Where Eagles Dare" (1968)--The further behind German lines the mission gets, the more British Richard Burton sounds; regardless, he fools the (bad) Germans.  Film's filled with things that go boom, nice scenery (The Alps?, Ingrid Pitt, etc.), sarcasm (mostly from Burton & Clint Eastwood).  Enjoyable war movie.

WHERE EAGLES DARE was filmed in Werfen, Austria part of Salzburg province.  It is the exact same location where the opening segment of the number, Do, Re, Mi was filmed for THE SOUND OF MUSIC.  In fact, you see the castle, behind Maria and the kids while they are having their picnic.  Both EAGLES and CROSSBOW are fine films, though I feel they show EAGLES quite a lot.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

never apologize Mister, it's a sign of weakness.

 

Only a fool would believe such a stupid line from a movie.

 

Try telling that to your "macho" President.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Another full day of war movies.  TCM owes me a week of Stanwyck movies after this. 

 

Also spellcheck needs to learn that Stanwyck is a  proper name.

 

i feel you.

if you got about 40 minutes to kill, you could do worse than this:

 

 

 

(radio episode of THE SCREEN DIRECTOR'S PLAYHOUSE with Barbara reprising her role in the 1950 movie NO MAN OF HER OWN.)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Tuesday, May 30

 

8 p.m.  It Started In Naples (1960) is my pick because of Sophia Loren and Vittorio De Sica.  Oh, and Clark Gable is in it too.

 
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Tuesday, May 30

 

8 p.m.  It Started In Naples (1960) is my pick because of Sophia Loren and Vittorio De Sica.  Oh, and Clark Gable is in it too.

 

Loren is a playful, voluptuous delight in It Started With Naples but Gable is clearly far too old for her, looking old enough to be her father.

 

This is ironic, since his previous film, But Not For Me, dealt in humourous terms with the idea of an age gap between Clark and a younger actress in love with him (Carroll Baker). Gable showed a maturity in this film (emotionally, that is) by acknowledging he was no longer a young stud. With It Started in Naples, however, it was back to the presentation of this aging leading man as "hot stuff" once again.

 

Ironically, too, Loren was THREE YEARS YOUNGER than Baker (for whom Gable's character finally admitted he was too old in the previous film).

 

Unfortunately, I don't see But Not For Me, an admittedly lightweight Paramount production, scheduled for broadcast in TCM's Gable tribute.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Tuesday, May 30th.  All times E.S.T.:

 

1:30 p.m. "The Thing From Another World" (1951)--Final creature feature of the month, and a darned good one.

 

10:00 p.m. "Mogambo" (1953)--Has Ava Gardner's only Oscar nominated performance; she and Gable strike sparks together in this amiable remake of "Red Dust" (1932).

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Tuesday, May 30th.  All times E.S.T.:

 

1:30 p.m. "The Thing From Another World" (1951)--Final creature feature of the month, and a darned good one.

 

 

Is it just me, or does Paul Frees sound like he is dubbing his own voice in each of his films?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it just me, or does Paul Frees sound like he is dubbing his own voice in each of his films?

 

YES!!!

 

I've ALWAYS thought that Rich, and no matter WHICH film I've ever seen(and heard) him in.

 

Yep, maybe that's why he'd eventually concentrate his career in voice-over/announcing/cartoon/dubbing work.

 

That oh so distinctive voice of his almost sounding "too studied" and/or "too authoritative" in any on the movies in which he appeared in person and as an actor.

 

(...he did do accents and dialects very well, though)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wednesday, May 31

 

4 a.m.  Mister Buddwing (1966).  Amnesia film with James Garner.  I can’t recall if I’ve seen this one.

 

Sorta surprised TCM stuck this movie in the middle of Clark Gable's Star of the Month tribute.  I didn't get this movie the first time I watched it, but on a second viewing I did and liked it all the more.  James Garner, Jean Simmons, Suzanne Pleshette, and Angela Lansbury give very nice performances here.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wed., May 31st.  All times E.S.T.:

 

7:45 a.m. "Never Let Me Go" (1953)--Only one of the four Gable films on in the morning I haven't seen.

 

I've always liked this escape from behind the Iron Curtain adventure, even if it is far fetched.

 

It's amazing, though, to see the difference in character actor Richard Haydn here, though. Film buffs probably best remember him as a comedy eccentric (such as Prof. Oddly in Ball of Fire) or, perhaps, his similar comedy performance when he appeared on The Dick Van Dyke Show. But here he gives a straight dramatic performance and it's difficult to even recognize him as the same actor.

 

ProfOddlyRichardHaydn.jpg

 

152209120.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=3&d=77BFB

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thursday night into Friday morning is looking pretty interesting, a pre-code with William Haines- JUST A GIGOLO- from 1931 starts off what looks to be a spotlight on gay and lesbian movies for June. Maltin gives it two stars- nuff said
 

Then the 1931 version of WATERLOO BRIDGE is on, I guess because James Whale directed it- I don't recall anything particularly gay about, but it is a lovely film with a compelling performance from Mae Clarke as the ballerina/streetwalker. (it's not as good as the 1940 remake, but still an interesting movie, well directed film)

 

At 3:30 in the damn morning, set your DVRS for CHRISTOPHER STRONG (1933)- this is a film that is special to me because it is the first non-horror and non "canon" ** classic film I ever saw- at something like the age of ten on TNT one spring morning ca. 1988 (or so.) I watched it because it had Dr. Frankenstein and Mina Harker in it, and Glinda the Good Witch too. i liked it just fine at the time; then fast forward to some time 4 or 5 years ago when i saw it again on TCM and it made a greater impression on me. it's an exquisite Precode, very British in its sensibilities, and it contains a performance that- had there been supporting awards at the time- should have earned Billie Burke a Best Supporting Actress statuette (provided DINNER AT EIGHT wasn't released during the same nomination period.)

 

 

**Universal horrors started me on classic films, and of course I'd seen GONE WITH THE WIND, THE WIZARD OF OZ and THE MALTESE FALCON at this point, but CHRISTOPHER STRONG was my first "well, you've probably never heard of this one" classic movie i saw.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Who has seen tonight's primetime movie, "Middle of the Night" with Fredric March and Kim Novak?  I'm undecided.  I love March, but my usual reaction when watching Miss Novak is to throw a pitcher of water on her face to wake her out of her trance.  Good story?  I see Lee Grant's in it and I always like her.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Who has seen tonight's primetime movie, "Middle of the Night" with Fredric March and Kim Novak?  I'm undecided.  I love March, but my usual reaction when watching Miss Novak is to throw a pitcher of water on her face to wake her out of her trance.  Good story?  I see Lee Grant's in it and I always like her.

 

OMG YES!

MY personal opinion on MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT is that it's boring and they show it too often.

(someone in the programming dept has an inexplicable fondness for Miss Novak.)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always liked this escape from behind the Iron Curtain adventure, even if it is far fetched.

 

It's amazing, though, to see the difference in character actor Richard Haydn here, though. Film buffs probably best remember him as a comedy eccentric (such as Prof. Oddly in Ball of Fire) or, perhaps, his similar comedy performance when he appeared on The Dick Van Dyke Show. But here he gives a straight dramatic performance and it's difficult to even recognize him as the same actor.

Good point about Haydn. I did not recognize him at all in Forever Amber.

 

Untitled_zpsajrcdvnf.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Lorna: see Middle of the Night. As for Miss Novak, cut her some slack ....she did get her start modeling with refrigerators at trade shows.

 

So you're saying Novak should have modeled with ovens before starting her acting career?    ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thursday, June 1

 

Another Frank Morgan day.  He made so many films I guess you can afford a few of these on the schedule.

 

6 a.m.  Secrets of the French Police (1932).  With Gregory Ratoff and Frank Morgan.

 

3:15 p.m.  Paradise For Three (1938).  It has Mary Astor in it too.

 

1:45 a.m.  No Time For Love (1943).  With Claudette Colbert and Fred MacMurray.

 
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Bogie, I am also a fan of The Half-Naked Truth, one of the most enjoyable of Gregory La Cava's comedies and a must for fans of fast-talking Lee Tracy. Definitely recommended.

 

I also agree that Paradise for Three is definitely worth checking out. Edna May Oliver is in it, as well as Mary Astor. A ski resort assumes that Robert Young is a rich businessman and Frank Morgan is a lowly employee when of course it's the other way around. The comedy builds from there. Note: it is weird to see a Hollywood film set in 1930s Germany that has no relation to the actual events going on then, but if you can get past that, it's a lot of fun.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...