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HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM


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...The first time I saw the scene where Jennifer Jones sits in her Cadillac convertible with her wayfarer sunglasses on, giving the orders to have her ex-lover Charlton Heston's farm fields flooded (and destroyed)- I orgasmed quietly inside.

 

 

Now that's revenge!

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Jennifer Jones day and no one is going to mention one of the most haunting of fantasies?

 

8am Portrait of Jennie (1948)

 

Story about a struggling artist who meets a young girl in the park one evening but every time he sees her afterward she has grown years older. Romantic fantasy about a mistake in time being corrected by forces beyond two lovers' control (or something like that). No matter what one may think of the logic of the story, the stunning photography of Joseph H. August (some images shot through a canvas to approximate the feel of a painting), combined with Dimitri Tiomkin's selections of Debussy themes, makes this lovely, sensitive film one to remember.

 

"Where I come from nobody knows and where I am going everyone goes."

 

With Jennifer Jones, Ethel Barrymore, David Wayne, Cecil Kellaway and, in one of his greatest "everyman" portrayals, Joseph Cotten.

 

I'm always amazed by Cotten's versatility, from smooth and sophisticated, even elegant on occasion (Shadow of a Doubt, Magnificent Ambersons, Since You Went Away) to ordinary, even bumbling, everymen types (Journey Into Fear, Third Man, Portrait of Jennie).

 

portrait-of-jennie-1948.jpg

 

I may watch it again..........at least the finale!

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If you want to see a whodunnit where you know whodunnit but none of the principals do, then try "Under Cover of Night tomorrow. I recorded this over six years ago and it hasn't played since.

 

The oddest scene - Lowe as a detective, Nat Pendleton as the same kind of thick cop he played in The Thin Man, and the wrongly accused suspect sit around in a sauna airing out their pores trying to figure out this whole mess of a mystery.

 

It's MGM, so I can't figure out why so many years between runs for this one on TCM.

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Wonder what happened to the painting?. It hung in Jennifer's bedroom for many years. She gave it as a gift to her make up man, George Masters, some time in her later years, claiming she never liked it. (He, of course, was thrilled). Not sure what happened to it after Masters died. Hanging in someone else's bedroom, I guess. Am sure it would sell for a fortune..........

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Wonder what happened to the painting?. It hung in Jennifer's bedroom for many years. She gave it as a gift to her make up man, George Masters, some time in her later years, claiming she never liked it. (He, of course, was thrilled). Not sure what happened to it after Masters died. Hanging in someone else's bedroom, I guess. Am sure it would sell for a fortune..........

 

Even more so, I wonder what happened to this:

 

Laura+-+Gene+Tierney.jpg

 

The last that I know of it the painting was hanging on the wall in the background in 1954's Women's World

 

Props003.3.jpg

 

(I'm guessing Clifton Webb stole it) ;)

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Even more so, I wonder what happened to this:

 

Laura+-+Gene+Tierney.jpg

 

The last that I know of it the painting was hanging on the wall in the background in 1954's Women's World

 

Props003.3.jpg

 

(I'm guessing Clifton Webb stole it) ;)

 

Actually Tom, I understand at the Woman's World wrap party it was given to Cornel Wilde for being voted the most "take him or leave him actor" of the four pictured there.  

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FILM COMMENT:   RUBY GENTRY-

 

"...Ruby Gentry is a swampwater tragedy that contains memorable music in the form of folk singing (via Ruby’s unpleasant evangelical brother) and its classic score, composed by Heinz Roemheld, which would later become a standard when sung by Ray Charles with Mitchell Parish’s lyrics.

 

Vidor, always a director who excelled when close to the earth, gets at something authentically wild and vital in this blend of seaside noir and Southern-fried soap opera....

 

see:  https://www.filmcomment.com/blog/tcm-diary-ruby-gentry/

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FILM COMMENT: RUBY GENTRY-

 

"...Ruby Gentry is a swampwater tragedy that contains memorable music in the form of folk singing (via Ruby’s unpleasant evangelical brother) and its classic score, composed by Heinz Roemheld, which would later become a standard when sung by Ray Charles with Mitchell Parish’s lyrics.

 

Vidor, always a director who excelled when close to the earth, gets at something authentically wild and vital in this blend of seaside noir and Southern-fried soap opera....

 

see: https://www.filmcomment.com/blog/tcm-diary-ruby-gentry/

 

THANK YOU! That review nails it.

 

Ps- As a native North Carolinian, I can stay with utter surety: one other thing that the movie gets absolutely right is Ruby's crazed evangelical brother.

 

I have known that character...Possibly even from a branch of my family tree....

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Even more so, I wonder what happened to this:

 

Laura+-+Gene+Tierney.jpg

 

The last that I know of it the painting was hanging on the wall in the background in 1954's Women's World

 

Props003.3.jpg

 

(I'm guessing Clifton Webb stole it) ;)

 

 

LOL. I wonder?

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The Counterculture theme gives us some nice supporting performances: Joyce Van Patten as Peter Sellers' fiancee in I Love You, Alice B. Toklas and Eileen Heckart as Edward Arnold's mother in Butterflies Are Free.

 

I also remember really liking Pat Quinn's lead performance as Alice in Alice's Restaurant. I have no idea how well this film holds up after almost fifty years.

 

On the other hand, I'm confident that the nonprofessionals who star in Zabriskie Point will look just as inept as they did way back when. The film is very pretty to look at, and man, that script must have have seemed really, you know, profound, man, if you were stoned. Sample line from the female lead: "'So anyway' ought to be the name of something . . . Soanyway River."

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 Thursday, September 14

 

10:15 a.m.  That Forsyte Woman (1949).   Something a bit different for Errol Flynn and he does well.

 

That Forsyte Woman was one of the few films Flynn made that he liked, and I can understand why. His first film at MGM, a far more prestigious studio than Warners, it gave him a chance to play against type as a conservative member of British artistocracy. He tries hard in the role and is the most interesting performer in the film. The film drips in MGM "good taste" and is really quite dull.

 

Truth is Flynn was far more effective the year before in a role with some superficial similarities in Silver River, made back on the Warners ranch. He manages to work a vulnerability into his hard portrayal, something that really fails to happen in the final scene of the MGM film, much as it may try.

 

But, unlike That Forsyte Woman, SR had a lot of friction on the set, which included a fallout with director buddy Raoul Walsh. Flynn devoted about a page in his autobiography to discussing the making of That Forsyte Woman while making only passing reference to Silver River.

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I have never seen ZABRISKIE POINT, but based on the DEF con level one dragging it was received on these boards over the years, I *really* want to.

 

(I need serious psychological help, I know)

Lorna, Zabriskie Point really catches a cultural moment (not unlike catching an unmentionable disease) in American history. As a friend of mine said about The Knack, the extreme datedness of it is the most interesting thing about it. At the time of ZP, many college students were opposed to the Vietnam War. Add to this the baby boomers' belief that they were ultra special and that their **** didn't stink (as a boomer, I'm not innocent here), and some college students considered themselves radicals and believed that they were, rather easily, going to overturn/remake society. Most of these, as you will see in ZP, though this wouldn't have been Antonioni's point, could not have found their rear ends with both hands searching. Some middle-aged persons rather fawned on the student generation, agreeing that they were ultra special, etc., and Antonioni is not innocent here.

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Lorna, Zabriskie Point really catches a cultural moment (not unlike catching an unmentionable disease) in American history. As a friend of mine said about The Knack, the extreme datedness of it is the most interesting thing about it. At the time of ZP, many college students were opposed to the Vietnam War. Add to this the baby boomers' belief that they were ultra special and that their **** didn't stink (as a boomer, I'm not innocent here), and some college students considered themselves radicals and believed that they were, rather easily, going to overturn/remake society. Most of these, as you will see in ZP, though this wouldn't have been Antonioni's point, could not have found their rear ends with both hands searching. Some middle-aged persons rather fawned on the student generation, agreeing that they were ultra special, etc., and Antonioni is not innocent here.

 

Au contraire, mon ami. 

 

Back then I was VERY level-headed and self-aware.

 

It's only been in about the last ten years or so where I've come off the rails.

 

;)

 

(...good write-up here actually, kingrat...couldn't have done a better job of explaining this movie's "milieu" myself here)

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I can buy that...........

 

Right, Hibi. Wasn't kingrat's explanation to Lorna about Zabriskie Poin.........

 

(...saaaaay...now what exactly WERE you "buyin'" here anyway, huh LADY?!!!)

 

;)

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Lorna, Zabriskie Point really catches a cultural moment (not unlike catching an unmentionable disease) in American history. As a friend of mine said about The Knack, the extreme datedness of it is the most interesting thing about it. At the time of ZP, many college students were opposed to the Vietnam War. Add to this the baby boomers' belief that they were ultra special and that their **** didn't stink (as a boomer, I'm not innocent here), and some college students considered themselves radicals and believed that they were, rather easily, going to overturn/remake society. Most of these, as you will see in ZP, though this wouldn't have been Antonioni's point, could not have found their rear ends with both hands searching. Some middle-aged persons rather fawned on the student generation, agreeing that they were ultra special, etc., and Antonioni is not innocent here.

You, Sir, are VICIOUS

...and I am HERE. FOR. IT.

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Saturday, Sept. 16th/17th: TCM Underground, in the U.S. only--A mummy double feature; both films are based on the same Bram Stoker novel.  All times E.S.T.:

 

2:30 a.m. "The Awakening" (1980)--Charlton Heston is an archeologist who opens ancient tombs with a sledgehammer, whose daughter is somehow possessed by the spirit of a long dead Egyptian queen.  I remember this being a howler, but there are respectful reviews of this on imdb.  I'll be watching to see if my memory is correct.  A TCM Premiere, according to MovieCollectorOH's information.

 

4:30 a.m. "Blood From The Mummy's Tomb" (1971)--Good mummy movie.  Five(?) archeologists take an object from an opened tomb, with predictably disastrous consequences.

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Saturday Sept 16 12:30 am

 

Now and Forever (1934)

 

It's been a while since I've seen this one but I recall thinking that Gary Cooper is quite good in an atypical role as a crook won over by urchin Shirley Temple, while girlfriend Carole Lombard stands around in a colourless role as his girlfriend who wants him to reform.

 

This film was made when Temple was on the verge of becoming a box office champion.

 

now6.jpg

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