Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM


Recommended Posts

Sunday, September 17/18

 

2:30 a.m.  Socrates (1971).  Possibly a premiere of this hard to catch Roberto Rossellini film?

 

not premiere @ MC's data :unsure:

 

"...an underlying theme in all of his (Rossellini's) films, and his personal belief in the power of knowledge. With Socrates in particular, he felt a special affinity, and he had hoped to make a film about him for years. Although he joked that, like the Greek philosopher, he never made any money, his persecution over the marriage to Ingrid Bergman and the increasing difficulties he experienced finding financing in later years helped him identify with the persecution of a man eventually forced to commit suicide by a state that had little understanding of his lessons about the power of rationalism and the human conscience...

 

Rossellini also layers his viewpoint of Socrates, adding a symbolic element to the near-documentary depiction of the past........

 

...the leftist critics in Italy complained that the director had robbed the philosopher of his radical message. More recently, however, critics have begun a serious reappraisal of his work in this area, both as an extension of the Neorealism he had helped pioneer in his earlier films and as a new kind of minimalist cinema."

 

 

see: http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/486560/Socrates/articles.html

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a bit late to mention this, but early tomorrow morning's Diane has fabulous costumes. Walter Plunkett really outdid himself. Lana Turner, as Diane de Poitiers, wears one amazing gown after another. If you want to see the young and hunky Roger Moore, he's also on display, and Marisa Pavan gives a splendid performance as Catherine de Medici.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Monday, Sept. 18th--Greta Garbo day--the two films that got her nominated for a 1930 Best Actress Academy Award.  All times E.S.T.:

 

11:45 a.m. "Romance" (1930)--Garbo is supposed to be exquisite, her costars less so.  Based on a 1913 play.

 

2:45 p.m. "Anna Christie" (1931)--According to the TCM online weekly schedule, this is the German language version of the film--I've only seen the English language version.  No information is available about this film on its' webpage--is it a TCM Premiere?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Monday, Sept. 18th--Greta Garbo day--the two films that got her nominated for a 1930 Best Actress Academy Award.  All times E.S.T.:

 

 

2:45 p.m. "Anna Christie" (1931)--According to the TCM online weekly schedule, this is the German language version of the film--I've only seen the English language version.  No information is available about this film on its' webpage--is it a TCM Premiere?

I am pretty sure TCM showed both versions on the same night several years ago. The American version bored me out of my skull.  All I recall is Garbo mumbling "what's the use," and Charles Bickford giving possibly the worst performance of his career. Maybe the German version is better.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am pretty sure TCM showed both versions on the same night several years ago. The American version bored me out of my skull.  All I recall is Garbo mumbling "what's the use," and Charles Bickford giving possibly the worst performance of his career. Maybe the German version is better.

 

Yes, I had read for many years what a terrific star and actress Garbo was, and that one of her signature roles was Anna Christie. So that was the first film that I ever saw her in, and I was left...less than amazed, to put it kindly. Since then, I've slowly seen more of her work and appreciate her more, but based on Anna Christie, I wasn't seeing the allure. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I had read for many years what a terrific star and actress Garbo was, and that one of her signature roles was Anna Christie. So that was the first film that I ever saw her in, and I was left...less than amazed, to put it kindly. Since then, I've slowly seen more of her work and appreciate her more, but based on Anna Christie, I wasn't seeing the allure. 

I think her silents were better. Her voice, at least in Anna Christie, sounded too manly and was a disappointment, and she didn't look very attractive either. On the other hand, her performance in Queen Christina was very good, and she looks radiant in that one.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am pretty sure TCM showed both versions on the same night several years ago. The American version bored me out of my skull.  All I recall is Garbo mumbling "what's the use," and Charles Bickford giving possibly the worst performance of his career. Maybe the German version is better.

 

You're right about TCM showing both versions.  I haven't seen the German version but from what I've read it's considered better.  ANNA CHRISTIE presents the world-weary Garbo like in GRAND HOTEL when she's not with Barrymore.  I get that ANNA is boring to some viewers but then I remember it's a very early talkie taken from a play when MGM was looking for just the right vehicle for "Garbo Talks" so it does have historical interest.

 

Off topic:  Want to really be bored out of your skull?  Try watching May Pickford in COQUETTE which I think is her first talkie.  I couldn't get through all of it. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Off topic:  Want to really be bored out of your skull?  Try watching May Pickford in COQUETTE which I think is her first talkie.  I couldn't get through all of it. 

 

As the winner of the second Best Actress Oscar, I've watched Coquette a couple of times, and it is rather awful. For years I considered Johnny Mack Brown's performance in that as the worst I had ever seen in a studio film.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Garbo is an acquired taste, I find.

 

The only reason I might rewatch sections of ANNA CHRISTIE (English version) is to watch Marie Dressler's engaging take on a waterfront barfly. I can't recall if Dressler is in the German version.

 

Garbo's theatrical performance in GRAND HOTEL remains one of her least effective, in my opinion. I have frequently watched this film, though, to watch Crawford and the Barrymore brothers, all at their best here.

 

QUEEN CHRISTINA remains Garbo's strongest star vehicle, in my opinion, with one of her best performances.

 

Dated as the film may be, CAMILLE has an exquisite performance from the Swede, for my money the best of her career. Any scene in which she is bantering with the villainous Henry Daniell is worth the price of admission.

 

NINOTCHKA, I suspect, may be Garbo's most popular film with many today, and it is clearly one of her better films and performances. Melvyn Douglas is one of her best leading men here, though it would have been lovely to see how well she might have worked with William Powell, the original casting choice, I believe.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Off topic:  Want to really be bored out of your skull?  Try watching May Pickford in COQUETTE which I think is her first talkie.  I couldn't get through all of it. 

 

While Johnny Mack Brown's performance makes trees appear less wooden by comparison in this film, Mary Pickford is quite wretched in this, as well, Oscar win or not. Not the Pickford who could be quite the feisty charmer during the silents.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Garbo is an acquired taste, I find.

 

The only reason I might rewatch sections of ANNA CHRISTIE (English version) is to watch Marie Dressler's engaging take on a waterfront barfly. I can't recall if Dressler is in the German version.

 

Garbo's theatrical performance in GRAND HOTEL remains one of her least effective, in my opinion. I have frequently watched this film, though, to watch Crawford and the Barrymore brothers, all at their best here.

 

QUEEN CHRISTINA remains Garbo's strongest star vehicle, in my opinion, with one of her best performances.

 

Dated as the film may be, CAMILLE has an exquisite performance from the Swede, for my money the best of her career. Any scene in which she is bantering with the villainous Henry Daniell is worth the price of admission.

 

NINOTCHKA, I suspect, may be Garbo's most popular film with many today, and it is clearly one of her better films and performances. Melvyn Douglas is one of her best leading men here, though it would have been lovely to see how well she might have worked with William Powell, the original casting choice, I believe.

 

 

No, Garbo's friend (I forget her name at the moment, she wrote some of her films) was in the German version.

 

Salka Viertel (it came to me later).

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am pretty sure TCM showed both versions on the same night several years ago. The American version bored me out of my skull.  All I recall is Garbo mumbling "what's the use," and Charles Bickford giving possibly the worst performance of his career. Maybe the German version is better.

 

The German version IS better.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Tuesday, September 19

 

1 p.m.  House of Numbers (1957).  The one twin film today that I haven’t seen.  With Jack Palance.

 

4 a.m.  Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963).  Vittorio De Sica film with Sophia Loren and Marcello Mastroianni.  And the thread title if anyone is paying attention.

 
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Tuesday, September 19

 

1 p.m.  House of Numbers (1957).  The one twin film today that I haven’t seen.  With Jack Palance.

 

4 a.m.  Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963).  Vittorio De Sica film with Sophia Loren and Marcello Mastroianni.  And the thread title if anyone is paying attention.

 

I'll be recording The Scapegoat (1959) 4:30 PM ET. I want to see it for Alec Guinness, Bette Davis, and because I like movies about goats.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Tuesday, September 19

 

 

4 a.m.  Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963).  Vittorio De Sica film with Sophia Loren and Marcello Mastroianni.  And the thread title if anyone is paying attention.

 

There's also another reason to pay attention to this sexy Italian comedy romp.

 

_1221034_5_454f1b79f1c01681fa1a214a9adbf

 

Sophia at a real peak moment in her career, she and Marcello would affectionately parody this famous strip scene decades later in Ready to Wear (Sophia again looked amazingly alluring as she doffed her clothes while an older Marcello falls asleep).

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...