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HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM


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No, Garbo's friend (I forget her name at the moment, she wrote some of her films) was in the German version.

 

Salka Viertel (it came to me later).

In 1993, a Florida millionaire bought, at auction, over 60 letters that Garbo had written to Viertel, between 1932 and 1973. I'm not sure if those letters were ever published, but in one of them, Garbo wrote "I have disappeared in the wilderness. I am practically a prisoner because I don't want anyone to know I am here." Other published excerpts reveal her loneliness and sadness. Very sad.

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In 1993, a Florida millionaire bought, at auction, over 60 letters that Garbo had written to Viertel, between 1932 and 1973. I'm not sure if those letters were ever published, but in one of them, Garbo wrote "I have disappeared in the wilderness. I am practically a prisoner because I don't want anyone to know I am here." Other published excerpts reveal her loneliness and sadness. Very sad.

 

THEY DID PUBLISH THIS EXCERPT FROM A LETTER GARBO WROTE TO GEORGE CUKOR ca. 1936 regarding her acceptance of him as director for their soon-to-start-filming CAMILLE:

 

"Dear Georgie-Worgie,

 

What can I say when one offers moonlight? When one offers romance? When one offers the stars?

 

Yes, YES! I will be Marguerite for you...for you and no one else...maybe one...LUBITSCH...but I think Ernst does not know our lady of the Camellias so well as you and I seem to...The tragedy, the ennui, the mercurial nature of the very woman.

 

Yes, I will be your Marguerite...but I must have gowns! I must have diamonds! I must have romance! I must have moonlight and stars!

 

There's also no ******** way I'm working with that *** **** monkey again.

 

Love,

g

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Wednesday, September 20

 

midnight.  The Stone Killer (1973).  I’m not really a fan of Michael Winner films.  He was an odd choice to team up with Charles Bronson.

 

I'm recording that one, as well as -

 

The Sisters (1938) 7:45 AM - I've never watched this Bette Davis flick.

 

Castle On the Hudson (1940) 12:00 PM - John Garfield and Ann Sheridan.

 

Out of the Fog (1941) 4:45 PM - John Garfield again, this time with Ida Lupino.

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Wednesday, Sept. 20th--Anatole Litvak day; all times E.S.T.:

 

6:00 a.m. "The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse" (1938)--Edward G. Robinson, Humphrey Bogart, and Claire Trevor in a neat little comedy drama.

 

3:15 p.m. "Blues in the Night" (1941)--Litvak film I haven't seen.

 

Neither have I, fl.

 

But I remember "my mama done tol' me" she saw it once and thought it was pretty good anyway. ;)

 

(...sorry...yeah, yet another "couldn't resist" line of mine here, huh) 

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BLUES IN THE NIGHT is WILD!

 

it's a movie that's very much ahead of its time, dabbles a little bit with meta-storytelling and has a character named Character...

 

Yeah Lorna, and I noticed(after checking it out in IMDb) that it also features Elia Kazan in one of his last roles before he would go behind the camera.

 

(...and then later direct a movie about dockworkers which would go on to this very day to be debated about as to its viability and appropriateness to be shown on TCM during Labor Day!)

 

LOL 

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Wednesday, Sept. 20th--Anatole Litvak day; all times E.S.T.:

 

6:00 a.m. "The Amazing Dr. Clitterhouse" (1938)--Edward G. Robinson, Humphrey Bogart, and Claire Trevor in a neat little comedy drama.

 

3:15 p.m. "Blues in the Night" (1941)--Litvak film I haven't seen.

 

 

Bogart referred to the film disparagingly as The Amazing Dr. Clitor-s!!!

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Blues in the Night is definitely worth seeing. An oddball musical, or "All This and Elia Kazan Too." The Sisters is enjoyable, especially for Bette Davis and Errol Flynn fans.

 

However, the Litvak movie I want to recommend strongly is The Long Night. A wonderful writer who no longer posts here recommended this movie to me several years ago, and I'm just paying it forward. This remake of the French classic LE JOUR SE LEVE is first-rate in all respects, even though it isn't quite so dark as the original and can't be quite so frank about sex. The story is moved to America and updated to post-WWII, and both aspects actually work.

 

Henry Fonda is Joe, an orphan, now an ex-soldier, who meets Barbara Bel Geddes as Jo, another orphan, who is drawn to the intellectual and musical worlds introduced to her by Vincent Price, a magician who yearns to despoil her innocence. Ann Dvorak is the worldly-wise ex-girlfriend of Fonda who longs to rekindle their romance. Elisha Cook, Jr. has a nice supporting role as another ex-GI who's a friend of Fonda. Fans of any of the five will not be disappointed. A first-rate film noir, well directed by Litvak and beautifully photographed in noir style by Sol Polito.

 

I consider The Long Night one of Litvak's three best films, along with Decision Before Dawn and The Journey, with The Snake Pit a close fourth and City for Conquest not far behind.

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Blues in the Night is definitely worth seeing. An oddball musical, or "All This and Elia Kazan Too." The Sisters is enjoyable, especially for Bette Davis and Errol Flynn fans.

 

However, the Litvak movie I want to recommend strongly is The Long Night. A wonderful writer who no longer posts here recommended this movie to me several years ago, and I'm just paying it forward. This remake of the French classic LE JOUR SE LEVE is first-rate in all respects, even though it isn't quite so dark as the original and can't be quite so frank about sex. The story is moved to America and updated to post-WWII, and both aspects actually work.

 

Henry Fonda is Joe, an orphan, now an ex-soldier, who meets Barbara Bel Geddes as Jo, another orphan, who is drawn to the intellectual and musical worlds introduced to her by Vincent Price, a magician who yearns to despoil her innocence. Ann Dvorak is the worldly-wise ex-girlfriend of Fonda who longs to rekindle their romance. Elisha Cook, Jr. has a nice supporting role as another ex-GI who's a friend of Fonda. Fans of any of the five will not be disappointed. A first-rate film noir, well directed by Litvak and beautifully photographed in noir style by Sol Polito.

 

I consider The Long Night one of Litvak's three best films, along with Decision Before Dawn and The Journey, with The Snake Pit a close fourth and City for Conquest not far behind.

 

 

Between your sumptuous review and the fact that MALTIN gives THE LONG NIGHT two stars and calls it "Plodding and sullen; a long night indeed" I am going to TRY VERY HARD to catch this this afternoon!

 

(a bad review from Maltin is akin to a rave from Pauline Kael.)

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Thursday, September 21/22

 

1:30 a.m.  Woodstock (1970).  In Canada this is replaced by that rock ’n’ roll sensation, Ryan’s Daughter.   Spoiler: Sarah Miles does Sinead O'Connor.

 

5:30 a.m.  Jim Hendrix (1973).  Somehow I missed this one over the years.

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