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HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM


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Seen it before and watched it last night.  Takes me back.  I was just a month away from my 16th birthday when that event took place.  The most enjoyment I get out of the film is seeing all those "counterculture" music "giants" before they got as big as they would soon become.  What I dislike about it is Pennebaker's pizz-poor choices in camera angles( especially during Otis Redding's segment)  and concentrating more on the crowd than the performers.

 

Pennebaker did a much better job on the Dylan documentary.

 

 

Sepiatone

I liked all but the last 15 minutes of Monterey Pop. It was great for all of the reasons you say. I liked the shots of the crowd. I think I saw a woman carrying  a baby around in a homemade tie-dyed backpack of  a thing with a peace symbol on it. I wonder whatever happened to that kid, who would be 50 today?  Although they only showed shots of the audience smoking cigarettes, I'm sure from the dilated pupils some were on stronger stuff than that.  What I absolutely did not like and would take 2 to 3 stars out of ten off of any review would be Ravi Shankar's prolonged performance. It went on for at least 15 minutes. At about 10 minutes into his performance it seemed like he was winding down and the audience clapped. I would have been clapping because maybe he was going to STOP! So maybe I'm just not culturally well rounded, but I just think his music makes "Horse with No Name" sound like Mozart. And it's just not the old me - I was 9 when this film came out. When George Harrison did his benefit for Bangladesh back in 1972, when I was 14, it was being broadcast on the radio. It started with a proloooooonged version of Ravi Shankar's music. After what seemed an eternity I turned off the broadcast and did something else. And that was in the day when the only way to hear the Beatles was either a radio or a big round piece of vinyl.

 

Now I shall wait for one particular commenter who always likes to come around and call me stupid when I make these kinds of comments and wait for her to do just that. But don't you criticize her! She'll have your posts taken down, I mean, how DARE you criticize her.  I live in the DC area. I'm used to people who behave like that. Sorry for getting OT in the last paragraph.

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I liked all but the last 15 minutes of Monterey Pop. It was great for all of the reasons you say. I liked the shots of the crowd. I think I saw a woman carrying  a baby around in a homemade tie-dyed backpack of  a thing with a peace symbol on it. I wonder whatever happened to that kid, who would be 50 today?  Although they only showed shots of the audience smoking cigarettes, I'm sure from the dilated pupils some were on stronger stuff than that.  What I absolutely did not like and would take 2 to 3 stars out of ten off of any review would be Ravi Shankar's prolonged performance. It went on for at least 15 minutes. At about 10 minutes into his performance it seemed like he was winding down and the audience clapped. I would have been clapping because maybe he was going to STOP! So maybe I'm just not culturally well rounded, but I just think his music makes "Horse with No Name" sound like Mozart. And it's just not the old me - I was 9 when this film came out. When George Harrison did his benefit for Bangladesh back in 1972, when I was 14, it was being broadcast on the radio. It started with a proloooooonged version of Ravi Shankar's music. After what seemed an eternity I turned off the broadcast and did something else. And that was in the day when the only way to hear the Beatles was either a radio or a big round piece of vinyl.

 

Now I shall wait for one particular commenter who always likes to come around and call me stupid when I make these kinds of comments and wait for her to do just that. But don't you criticize her! She'll have your posts taken down, I mean, how DARE you criticize her.  I live in the DC area. I'm used to people who behave like that. Sorry for getting OT in the last paragraph.

 

Offering a critique expressing our likes and dislikes is a hallmark of freedom in our country (for the time being, anyway!).  I get what you're saying about Ravi Shankar.  For a Western Civilization audience, the sound of a sitar may be an acquired taste, while some will take to it like a fish to water, as the saying goes.  Some people might like it as much as they like broccoli or marshmallows.  I liked the footage of Shankar's performance in that it showed what that instrument looks like.  To me, the sound of a sitar is almost like a melancholy banjo.  It lends a very distinctive sound though, like on the Beatles song, 'Norwegian Wood'.

 

As for comparing "Horse With No Name" to Mozart, I'll take America's first hit tune eight times out of ten!  However, if radio were prevalent in the 17 and 1800's, who's to say Mozart's music wouldn't have topped the charts as frequently as Maroon 5, Toby Keith, or Beyoncé do today?   ;)

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ON TONIGHT AT 8:00

 

It's nice to see the detente between TCM and Fox continuing with CALL NORTHSIDE 777 (1948) coming on tonight.

 

A really well acted film- more docu-crime than noir in my book, but a noir in the books of others and I got no quibbles with that call....I can't remember who it is that plays the mother of the convicted man in this, but she is excellent.

 

afterwards, i says skip BOOMERANG! (1947), even if it is a Kazan joint, it's nothing special.

 

I'm hoping that maybe this is some sort of sign that TCM has obtained the rights to the Fox noir catalog.  I'd love for them to repeat Nightmare Alley again.  I also want to see Daisy Kenyon and Vicki

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I have one to record tomorrow, Monday September 25:

 

The Man Who Watched Trains Go By (1952) 11:30 PM ET - I haven't seen this Claude Rains film from England, also featuring Felix Aylmer, Ferdy Mayne, Marius Goring, Anouk Aimee, and primetime spotlight star Herbert Lom (kudos to TCM for singling him out for a tribute).

 

The day looks like a Choo-Choo theme, with everything from The Great Train Robbery (1903) to Murder She Said (1961).

 

I recommend The Narrow Margin (1952) 10:00 AM ET, and La Bete Humaine (1938) 2:45 PM ET.

 

At night, during the Herbie Lom tribute, I recommend the Hammer Phantom of the Opera (1962) 9:45 PM ET, as well as perennial favorite The Ladykillers (1956) 1:15 AM ET, and my favorite Clouseau film, A Shot in the Dark (1964) 4:45 AM ET.

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I'm hoping that maybe this is some sort of sign that TCM has obtained the rights to the Fox noir catalog.  I'd love for them to repeat Nightmare Alley again.  I also want to see Daisy Kenyon and Vicki

 

Eddie Muller has said on Twitter that he's trying to get NIGHTMARE ALLEY on Noir Alley sometime in 2018.

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I have one to record tomorrow, Monday September 25:

 

The Man Who Watched Trains Go By (1952) 11:30 PM ET - I haven't seen this Claude Rains film from England, also featuring Felix Aylmer, Ferdy Mayne, Marius Goring, Anouk Aimee, and primetime spotlight star Herbert Lom (kudos to TCM for singling him out for a tribute).

 

 

The Man Who Watched Trains Go By, filmed in Europe, is a minor film but worth a look for admirers of Claude Rains (one of only six films he made during the '50s).

 

I wrote a review of this film some time ago and will post just this part of it here:

 

But it's Rains who is the primary interest in this drama, and it's his performance that brings many of the small pleasures to be found in this film which, at times, is noteworthy for its lovely Technicolor. Rains plays a man who, by circumstances, stumbles into crime after a life of total boring respectability, and there are unsettling scenes in which an inner demon suddenly springs upon the face of an otherwise docile little man.

 

the-paris-express-movie-poster-1952-1020

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Eddie Muller has said on Twitter that he's trying to get NIGHTMARE ALLEY on Noir Alley sometime in 2018.

 

That's good to hear (read?) ! I haven't been able to find a copy of this movie anywhere (I suppose I can buy a new copy on Amazon).  I'd love to be able to record it again so that it can live on my DVR.

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I cant remember if I mentioned it or not, but a while back I read the William Lindsay Gresham (?) novel NIGHTMARE ALLEY was based on and it made me appreciate the film all the more (it's not a bad book- but it would've benefited from a more forceful editing job, it goes on too long and is too dark and does not have the pacing of the film.)

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I agree with Lorna that Boomerang is not one of Kazan's better films.

 

The train theme for Monday morning has a bunch of entertaining films. If you haven't seen The Tall Target, The Narrow Margin, The General, La Bete Humaine, Strangers on a Train, or Murder She Said, now is a good time to catch up.

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ON TONIGHT AT 8:00

 

It's nice to see the detente between TCM and Fox continuing with CALL NORTHSIDE 777 (1948) coming on tonight.

 

A really well acted film- more docu-crime than noir in my book, but a noir in the books of others and I got no quibbles with that call....I can't remember who it is that plays the mother of the convicted man in this, but she is excellent.

 

 

That Mother was played by Polish born actress KASIA ORZAZEWSKI.  Can't find much else on her filmography.  And not that my too being Polish makes me biased, but she does do excellently in that role  ;)

 

 

And CALVIN-----No worries here.  I don't know who else you were referring to, but I wouldn't call you stupid for thinking Shankar's playing was longer than you had patience for.  Indian Ragas aren't for everybody.  And most I've heard don't go on for that long, but then others can be longer.  But, IMHO. I believe Shankar's raga in MONTEREY POP was made to seem  too long due to the horrible camera work.  As a guitarist, I find the sitar a fascinating instrument.  And once having tried to PLAY one, I admire what Shankar is capable of with it all the more.  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

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I agree with Lorna that Boomerang is not one of Kazan's better films.

 

 

 

I wouldn't dismiss Boomerang. It's worth a look. Dana Andrews is quite good in it, as he usually was during his '40s period. But the scene in which a lawyer, for dramatic courtroom effect, has a loaded gun placed to his head and the trigger pulled, rather than doing it to the head of a plastic dummy, had me shouting out loud, "Give.Me.A.Break."

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I wouldn't dismiss Boomerang. It's worth a look. Dana Andrews is quite good in it, as he usually was during his '40s period. But the scene in which a lawyer, for dramatic courtroom effect, has a loaded gun placed to his head and the trigger pulled, rather than doing it to the head of a plastic dummy, had me shouting out loud, "Give.Me.A.Break."

Yes, that one scene is pretty bogus (and never happened during the actual trial).

a. Who takes a loaded gun into a courtroom, and

b. allows someone to fire at him to make a point?

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Yes, that one scene is pretty bogus (and never happened during the actual trial).

a. Who takes a loaded gun into a courtroom, and

b. allows someone to fire at him to make a point?

 

Actually the DA asks the presiding judge to load the bullets into the gun, then hand it back to him. Which brings up another question, how many judges would do that? Really silly moment in the film.

 

Still, Boomerang was produced by Fox when semi-documentary type films of this type were in style, and it's reasonably interesting, if unexceptional. It looks like Kazan must have gotten a lot of the residents of whatever town he shot the film in to appear in the film as local residents, some of them with dialogue, which adds to the film's realism.

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Actually the DA asks the presiding judge to load the bullets into the gun, then hand it back to him. Which brings up another question, how many judges would do that? Really silly moment in the film.

 

Still, Boomerang was produced by Fox when semi-documentary type films of this type were in style, and it's reasonably interesting, if unexceptional. It looks like Kazan must have gotten a lot of the residents of whatever town he shot the film in to appear in the film as local residents, some of them with dialogue, which adds to the film's realism.

The film was shot in Stamford CT, but the actual crime occurred in Bridgeport, CT (on a street corner which no longer exists).

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Tuesday, Sept. 26th--Sci-fi/horror day, Jennifer Jones at night.  All times E.S.T.:

 

4:30 p.m. "Queen of Outer Space" (1958)--Zsa Zsa Gabor film is the camp pick of the day.

 

8:00 p.m. "The Barretts of Wimpole Street" (1957)--Jennifer Jones and John Gielgud sound like a potentially fine acting matchup.  Trailer on TCM is worth checking out.

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Tuesday, Sept. 26th--Sci-fi/horror day, Jennifer Jones at night.  All times E.S.T.:

 

4:30 p.m. "Queen of Outer Space" (1958)--Zsa Zsa Gabor film is the camp pick of the day.

 

8:00 p.m. "The Barretts of Wimpole Street" (1957)--Jennifer Jones and John Gielgud sound like a potentially fine acting matchup.  Trailer on TCM is worth checking out.

 

unless i am mistaken (and hey, what are the odds?) this is a SHOT FOR SHOT, LINE FOR LINE, near-exact remake of the 1934 film.

 

it's freakin' weird....

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unless i am mistaken (and hey, what are the odds?) this is a SHOT FOR SHOT, LINE FOR LINE, near-exact remake of the 1934 film.

 

it's freakin' weird....

 

The Maltin review of the 1957 version of THE BARRETTS . . . is interesting:

 

Tame interpretation of the lilting romance between poets Browning and Barrett, with actors bogged down in prettified fluff. Director Franklin fared better with this material in 1934.

 

So what was so prettified and/or fluffy about the later version?

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The Maltin review of the 1957 version of THE BARRETTS . . . is interesting:

 

So what was so prettified and/or fluffy about the later version?

I can't say as I recall. It's one of those films that I think I've seen, but remember next to nothing about BESIDES THE FACT THAT IT WAS A NEAR EXACT FACSIMILE OF THE ORIGINAL...like, meticulously so...

 

(back then I guess they figured nobody was ever going to re-watch old movies or have anyway to do so. And since the original with such gangbusters, why not just copy it exactly?)

 

Leo McCarey did just about the same thing the same year with AN AFFAIR TO REMEMBER which is almost shot for shoT his earlier LOVE AFFAIR.

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