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Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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I think it's a great film with fine performances, but DiCaprio didn't quite have the gravitas then. Seemed too young, unlike a few years later, when he came off so much better as J. Edgar.

 

I agree that Leonardo DiCaprio looks young in THE AVIATOR, but I think his performance as Howard Hughes is amazing.

I can't think of another movie actor of his generation who has as much range.

And he takes such chances in his performances, never turning in a "personality" performance as most American movie actors do.

 

PS. I can totally relate to the scene in THE AVIATOR where DiCaprio as Hughes doesn't want to touch the washroom door.

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Friday, July 10

 

I’ve seen most of the good ones.  If I had to pick a repeat it might be ...

 

12:15 Armored Car Robbery (1950).  I like Charles McGraw.

 

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Just caught the ending of Earth vs. the Flying Saucers.  The Saucers were making mince meat of Washington and its famous landmarks.  Then in one scene a saucer lands on the White House front lawn and two aliens come out.  As in DTESS, the Americans send two soldiers with rifles to safeguard the President against the saucer.  This doesn't work.  The aliens vaporize the two soldiers but then inexplicably get back into their saucer and fly away.

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Did anyone think any of the actors in The Aviator came close to the classic actors portrayed in the movie? I must say the only resemblance I saw or heard was by the dialect of Blanchett as Katharine Hepburn. Other than that it was a total miss.

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Did anyone think any of the actors in The Aviator came close to the classic actors portrayed in the movie? I must say the only resemblance I saw or heard was by the dialect of Blanchett as Katharine Hepburn. Other than that it was a total miss.

I thought DiCaprio was pretty good as Hughes, my only complaint is that he was a bit too young for the part.  If this movie were just being released today (instead of in 2004), I'd say that DiCaprio was perfect. 

 

Kate Beckinsale, while pretty, lacks the exotic glamour that Ava Gardner had.  Even though Gardner was born and raised in N. Carolina, she had a very unique look about her.  Beckinsale's beauty, in my opinion, is more generic.  There's nothing extraordinary about it.

 

Gwen Stefani, to me did not look like Jean Harlow at all.  It looked like Gwen Stefani was attending a movie premiere in the 1930s. 

 

I really liked Cate Blanchett as Katharine Hepburn.  I like Blanchett's work in general, but I thought she seemed like she was the only actor who really look the time to study the person they were portraying and did all she could to best emulate Hepburn's voice, speech pattern and mannerisms.  Hepburn's voice is very unique.  Blanchett is also Australian, which to me makes her portrayal of Hepburn even more impressive--not only does she have to speak in an American accent, but she has to try and emulate Hepburn's Mid-Atlantic accent.  While Blanchett might not exactly look like Hepburn, I thought she nailed it. The other actors, in my opinion, seemed to be portraying a more stereotypical image of the actors they were portraying.

 

Then there's Jude Law playing my Errol.  ::Sigh:: Law doesn't do justice to Flynn's looks at all.  He lacks the charisma and personality of Flynn as well.  To me, Law is very bland. 

 

aviator1-6.jpg

Jude Law as Flynn

 

 

Annex%20-%20Flynn,%20Errol_02.jpg

The real Flynn.

 

Seriously Hollywood? There's no contest.

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Then there's Jude Law playing my Errol.  ::Sigh:: Law doesn't do justice to Flynn's looks at all.  He lacks the charisma and personality of Flynn as well.  To me, Law is very bland. 

 

The real Flynn.

 

Seriously Hollywood? There's no contest.

I've seen Jude Law on stage three times at least, in Shakespeare, Euripides, and Cocteau -- he's amazing. Flynn is fun to see on screen, and I like his movies, but he can't compare to Law as an actor.

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Has anyone seen Kevin Kline as Errol Flynn in The Last of Robin Hood (2013)?  It's supposed to be about Flynn's final days.

Kline can be pretty god at times.

Sorry, not trying to change the Aviator topic entirely.

 

Oh - just checking the film on the imdb and noticed that Errol's grandson, Sean Flynn has a bit part in it.  Check him out on the imdb.

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I've seen almost everything--2 late goodies--one I've seen & one new one (to me ):

 

9:45 EST--"Kiss Me Deadly"(1955)--Classic film noir.

 

11:45 EST--"On Dangerous Ground" (1952)--Ida Lupino & Bernard Herrmann's favorite score (according to Maltin)--for me, a must-see.

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I've seen almost everything--2 late goodies--one I've seen & one new one (to me ):

 

9:45 EST--"Kiss Me Deadly"(1955)--Classic film noir.

 

11:45 EST--"On Dangerous Ground" (1952)--Ida Lupino & Bernard Herrmann's favorite score (according to Maltin)--for me, a must-see.

On Dangerous Ground is a great noir, don't miss seeing this one. Location shots of the city and the country are so perfect, capturing the lonliness, darkness and the moodiness of both. Ryan as the bad guy/good guy is one of his best performances imo. Ida is so touching in this one. You're gonna love this one.

I've also read that Herrman's favorite score that he composed was for The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, so not sure if Maltin is right on that one, but the score for On  Dangerous Ground is great. 

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Don't forget about Gwen Stefani as Jean Harlow-- who looks nothing like Harlow whatsoever.

 

Stefani apparently had some dialogue and more scenes than just the one in which she appeared (silently), but was so awful that they were left on the cutting room floor (see also: Faith Hill in THE STEPFORD WIVES.)

 

I have to also say that- while I have not seen the entire movie because I thought it was really, really boring- I'm 50/50 on DiCaprio's performance (see also DJANGO UNCHAINED) and thought Cate Blanchet- while a good actress in numerous other films- was dreadful as Hepburn.

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I have to also say that- while I have not seen the entire movie because I thought it was really, really boring- I'm 50/50 on DiCaprio's performance (see also DJANGO UNCHAINED) and thought Cate Blanchet- while a good actress in numerous other films- was dreadful as Hepburn.

 

 

I liked Leonardo DiCaprio a lot in THE AVIATOR but (while I like Cate Blanchett as an actor very much ---- I wish a recording of her stage performance as Blanche DuBois in A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE would be released or broadcast) I did not care much for her as Katharine Hepburn. The Academy obviously thought otherwise since she was given an Oscar for it.

 

I think she did a good job with Hepburn's speech pattern and I liked the scene with her outside the door when Hughes was having his meltdown, but for the most part I did not care for her in that movie.

Then again I'm not much of a fan of Katherine Hepburn either.

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I did not care much for her as Katharine Hepburn. The Academy obviously thought otherwise since she was given an Oscar for it..

I think Blanchett's Oscar win was one of those times where their selection just reeked of politics. She had been nominated for Best Lead something like 3 times before, & I think there was still residual guilt over not awarding her for her Queen Elizabeth in 1998 and giving it instead to Princess Gwynnikins (an investment that has paid off so little that it looks absolutely and utterly foolish in retrospect)

 

it was one of those "its her time AND she's in the supporting category, let's go ahead, an Oscar is an Oscar etc etc" decisions. she won pretty much so that they can finally bill her as "Academy Award winner Cate Blanchett" and not because of anything spectacular she did in the role.

 

ironically, while I have not seen all of her films, her work in " the Aviator" is about the only time where I can recalled distincly not liking her in a film. I even liked her in "notes on a scandal" where I thought she was the true lead and far, far better than the one note performance given by co-star Judi Dench that for some reason went over gangbusters with the Academy.

 

(of course, you could say that about every Judi Dench performance.)

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Just wanted to mention, while I've avoided THE AVIATOR for some time (due to an anti-DiCaprio bias) I thought the film was excellent. Scorsese directed a dramatic, evocative, beautifully photographed portrait of an eccentric genius, slowly succumbing to his mental demons.

Gotta say, though, was not pleased with any of the other celebrity portrayals. Although trying to depict any well-known persona has GOT to be one of the most challenging and thankless roles an actor can attempt. Most folks will never be satisfied. But, especially toward the end of the movie, I really did finally see 'Hughes' in DiCaprio.

Must say, of the Scorsese/DiCaprio collaborations I've seen (because of the director & in spite of the actor) this was outstanding.

Also want to thank R.O. for his comments on the 2-strip/3-strip technicolor look to the movie, which I would probably never have noticed on first viewing.

 

thanks, Holden, for heads-up on this one :)

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Has anyone seen Kevin Kline as Errol Flynn in The Last of Robin Hood (2013)?  It's supposed to be about Flynn's final days.

Kline can be pretty god at times.

Sorry, not trying to change the Aviator topic entirely.

 

Oh - just checking the film on the imdb and noticed that Errol's grandson, Sean Flynn has a bit part in it.  Check him out on the imdb.

 

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I even liked her in "notes on a scandal" where I thought she was the true lead and far, far better than the one note performance given by co-star Judi Dench that for some reason went over gangbusters with the Academy.

 

(of course, you could say that about every Judi Dench performance.)

I saw Notes on a Scandal a few months ago -- a friend showed it to me on DVD. I didn't recall having heard of it. Very disturbing film. I love Judi Dench on stage, but I agree that her performance in Notes was one note (it was a sort of horror movie performance), unlike Blanchett, who gave an excellent performance.

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Saturday, July 11

 

7:30 a.m.  Beauty and the Boss (1932) with Warren William and Marian Marsh.  Another pre code that I have never seen.   These just weren’t on tv when I was a kid.

 

10 a.m.  Batman and Robin: Tunnel of Terror (1949)

 

5 p.m.  America, America (1963) by Elia Kazan.  If I didn’t already have a dvd copy of it this would be my pick of the day.  Really solid supporting performances by Paul Mann, John Marley, Salem Ludwig, Lou Antonio,  Katharine Balfour and Linda Marsh.

 

12:15 a.m.  The Baroness and the Butler (1938).  A William Powell film that I have yet to see.

 

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I was quite impressed by THE AVIATOR, a portrait of the legendary millionaire eccentric during his Hollywood glamour years, though not shirking the beginning of the darker psychological disintegration that would forever engulf him. As far as his obsessive compulsiveness is concerned, though, I must plead guilt to identifying with him in one scene in the film - that in which he refuses to touch a public washroom door knob. Been in that position myself any of a number of times.

 

I thought that Leonardo Di Caprio and Cate Blanchett were both quite splendid in their roles, even thinking that Leo started looking a bit like the real Hughes as the film progressed. Blanchett may not have looked like Kate Hepburn but she certainly captured the actress's manner and vocal mannerisms to an impressive degree, without ever seeming like a caricature.

 

Since the film told its story in a, more or less, chronological order of events, I was surprised by at least one glaring boo boo. We see Hughes and Hepburn in a nightclub with Errol Flynn at their table, the millionaire talking about shooting a western, The Outlaw, a film that would begin production in 1941. Yet the next scene had Hughes in what was dated across the screen as 1935, clearly long before any thoughts of The Outlaw or any hell raising with Flynn, the latter not becoming a star until the very tale end of that year.

 

Highlight of the film for me was the spectacular plane crash during a test flight by Hughes, with the plane wheels scratching along a roof top and one of its wings slicing through the wall of a home. This was viewed from the inside of the home. Great special effects, direction, photography and editing of this knockout sequence.

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Just wanted to mention, while I've avoided THE AVIATOR for some time (due to an anti-DiCaprio bias) I thought the film was excellent. Scorsese directed a dramatic, evocative, beautifully photographed portrait of an eccentric genius, slowly succumbing to his mental demons.

Gotta say, though, was not pleased with any of the other celebrity portrayals. Although trying to depict any well-known persona has GOT to be one of the most challenging and thankless roles an actor can attempt. Most folks will never be satisfied. But, especially toward the end of the movie, I really did finally see 'Hughes' in DiCaprio.

Must say, of the Scorsese/DiCaprio collaborations I've seen (because of the director & in spite of the actor) this was outstanding.

Also want to thank R.O. for his comments on the 2-strip/3-strip technicolor look to the movie, which I would probably never have noticed on first viewing.

 

thanks, Holden, for heads-up on this one :)

 

I've had this one on my list for some time, for the very reasons you give.  Haven't seen it yet, but recorded it.  Maybe it will go down a bit easier if l pretend it is Howard Hughes portraying Decaprio (I don't really know what either of them look like anyhow).

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Highlight of the film for me was the spectacular crash of the Blue Goose, with the plane wheels scratching along a roof top and one of its wings slicing through the wall of a home. This was viewed from the inside of the home. Great special effects, direction, photography and editing of this knockout sequence.

Hughes' wooden plane, is the largest flying boat ever produced, is also known as "The Spruce Goose" and is currently being exhibited at the Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum in McMinnville, OR.  I was fortunate to see the plane a few years ago.  It is enormous and pretty spectacular to see in person.

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I was quite impressed by THE AVIATOR, a portrait of the legendary millionaire eccentric during his Hollywood glamour years, though not shirking the beginning of the darker psychological disintegration that would forever engulf him. As far as his obsessive compulsiveness is concerned, though, I must plead guilt to identifying with him in one scene in the film - that in which he refuses to touch a public washroom door knob. Been in that position myself any of a number of times.

 

 

 

As I mentioned in another post. I could totally relate to DiCaprio as Hughes not wanting to touch the washroom door in that scene from THE AVIATOR.

It is frustratingg to wash one's hands in a public washroom and then have to touch the door handle!

Paper towels and hand sanitizer have come to my rescue on many occasions so luckily I've never been trapped in the washroom like in the movie.

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Saturday, July 11

 

7:30 a.m.  Beauty and the Boss (1932) with Warren William and Marian Marsh.  Another pre code that I have never seen.   These just weren’t on tv when I was a kid.

 

10 a.m.  Batman and Robin: Tunnel of Terror (1949)

 

5 p.m.  America, America (1963) by Elia Kazan.  If I didn’t already have a dvd copy of it this would be my pick of the day.  Really solid supporting performances by Paul Mann, John Marley, Salem Ludwig, Lou Antonio,  Katharine Balfour and Linda Marsh.

 

12:15 a.m.  The Baroness and the Butler (1938).  A William Powell film that I have yet to see.

THE BARONESS AND THE BUTLER, another of the relatively many 20th Century Fox titles on TCM recently, is a decent comedy, set in Budapest, I think. William Powell does another turn as a wise butler, but here he gets involved in politics, naturally on the opposite side as that of his employers. Future Mrs. Tyrone Power Annabella plays the baroness, of course falling in love with her butler. The atudio had meant the leads for Warner Baxter and Loretta Young.

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Just wanted to mention, while I've avoided THE AVIATOR for some time (due to an anti-DiCaprio bias) I thought the film was excellent. Scorsese directed a dramatic, evocative, beautifully photographed portrait of an eccentric genius, slowly succumbing to his mental demons.

Gotta say, though, was not pleased with any of the other celebrity portrayals. Although trying to depict any well-known persona has GOT to be one of the most challenging and thankless roles an actor can attempt. Most folks will never be satisfied. But, especially toward the end of the movie, I really did finally see 'Hughes' in DiCaprio.

Must say, of the Scorsese/DiCaprio collaborations I've seen (because of the director & in spite of the actor) this was outstanding.

Also want to thank R.O. for his comments on the 2-strip/3-strip technicolor look to the movie, which I would probably never have noticed on first viewing.

 

thanks, Holden, for heads-up on this one :)

 

You're welcome, mr6666. I'm glad you gave the movie a chance and that you enjoyed it.

 

I'm a big fan of Leonardo DiCaprio as an actor so I'm surprised when some people say that they avoid his movies.

I think perhaps they associate him with TITANIC, the big movie that made him a "star."

While I do enjoy TITANIC, DiCaprio's role in that movie is not a typical one for him.

He is one the few American movie actors who consistently takes chances with his movie work, rather than just turning in the "personality" performances that we get from most American movie actors.

And his film work has always been at this level, even back when he was still quite young. 

Have you seen him in THIS BOY'S LIFE, which also stars Robert DeNiro as his stepfather? 

I highly recommend this movie as an example of the fantastic early work of Leonardo DiCaprio.

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I was quite impressed by THE AVIATOR, a portrait of the legendary millionaire eccentric during his Hollywood glamour years, though not shirking the beginning of the darker psychological disintegration that would forever engulf him. As far as his obsessive compulsiveness is concerned, though, I must plead guilt to identifying with him in one scene in the film - that in which he refuses to touch a public washroom door knob. Been in that position myself any of a number of times.

 

I thought that Leonardo Di Caprio and Cate Blanchett were both quite splendid in their roles, even thinking that Leo started looking a bit like the real Hughes as the film progressed. Blanchett may not have looked like Kate Hepburn but she certainly captured the actress's manner and vocal mannerisms to an impressive degree, without ever seeming like a caricature.

 

Since the film told its story in a, more or less, chronological order of events, I was surprised by at least one glaring boo boo. We see Hughes and Hepburn in a nightclub with Errol Flynn at their table, the millionaire talking about shooting a western, The Outlaw, a film that would begin production in 1941. Yet the next scene had Hughes in what was dated across the screen as 1935, clearly long before any thoughts of The Outlaw or any hell raising with Flynn, the latter not becoming a star until the very tale end of that year.

 

Highlight of the film for me was the spectacular plane crash during a test flight by Hughes, with the plane wheels scratching along a roof top and one of its wings slicing through the wall of a home. This was viewed from the inside of the home. Great special effects, direction, photography and editing of this knockout sequence.

When I first saw THE AVIATOR at the movies, I too was struck by the anachronisms, which jump out at me jarringly. I didn't pay close attention the other night, but I believe someone here mentioned the premiere of THE WOMEN, with Hughes accompanied by Ava Gardner, whcih would have been two years before she arrived in Hollywood. I think this is also the scene when Linda Darnell is first mentioned; she would have been newly arrived in Hollywood and all of 15 years old. Hughes would not become involved with her until after WW2.

 

Besides Di Caprio, who is otherwise magnificent, seeming too young, as well as the portrayals of the other film personalities not up to par, the occasional anachronisms would be my only real criticism of this great film.

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Have you seen him in THIS BOY'S LIFE, which also stars Robert DeNiro as his stepfather? 

I highly recommend this movie as an example of the fantastic early work of Leonardo DiCaprio.

I agree. This Boy's Life is a very strong domestic drama, with first rate work by both Di Caprio and Robert De Niro as his brutish step father.

 

From what I've seen of Di Caprio he is a very impressive actor, who tends to play complex, not particularly likeable characters. Perhaps the latter reason is one of the reasons why I've never taken a shine to him or, at least, his characters. I take nothing away from his obvious talent, however.

 

I keep waiting for the inevitable (?) union of Scorcese, De Niro  and Di Caprio on the big screen one day.

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