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HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM


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The Maltin review of the 1957 version of THE BARRETTS . . . is interesting:

 

Tame interpretation of the lilting romance between poets Browning and Barrett, with actors bogged down in prettified fluff. Director Franklin fared better with this material in 1934.

 

So what was so prettified and/or fluffy about the later version?

 

If Maltin didnt like it, I'll probably like it then. I have seen a small portion of it, but not the whole movie...

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That's right!

wasn't it his final film?

 

Not sure.

 

Yes, you're right! (checked imdb) A long gap between his last and the one before. Wonder what drew him back?

 

I noticed after reading he kept to producing in his later years. Guess that explains the gap. Guess he couldnt resist directing the remake.......

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The Maltin review of the 1957 version of THE BARRETTS . . . is interesting:

 

Tame interpretation of the lilting romance between poets Browning and Barrett, with actors bogged down in prettified fluff. Director Franklin fared better with this material in 1934.

 

So what was so prettified and/or fluffy about the later version?

 

My guess is that it's Maltin's reference to it being filmed in vivid Metrocolor and Cinemascope, Holden.

 

And which of course, and like many a remake made in the '50s, would be the prime reason for making remakes of earlier films during that time.

 

(...and another one besides those already mentioned, being a shot-for-shot remake of The Prisoner of Zenda in 1952 in vivid Technicolor)

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The Man Who Watched Trains Go By, filmed in Europe, is a minor film but worth a look for admirers of Claude Rains (one of only six films he made during the '50s).

 

 

After last night's broadcast of The Man Who Watched Trains Go By Ben said that Paul Jerrico, co-writer of the film's screenplay, did not had his name listed on the film, a victim of the blacklist. Jerrico spent much of his life afterward trying to get blacklisted sccreenwriters' names put back on their films again. His own name was put back on TMWWTGB in 2000. Unfortunately, Jerrico didn't live to see it, killed in an automobile accident three years before. Last night's quite nice print of the film shown on TCM did not have Jerrico's name.

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Tomorrow I'm recording Tender is the Night (1962) 12:45 AM ET - I want to see it for Jason Robards. I've heard of it, but nothing about it.

 

 

I've seen it a few times. Jennifer is good, but like Farewell to Arms too old for the part. I think TCM showed it for the first time a few years ago......

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Wednesday, Sept. 27th--all times E.S.T.:

 

7:45 a.m. "Larceny, Inc." (1942)--Funny comedy of ex-con Edward G. Robinson and co. taking over a luggage shop to get into the bank next door.  With Jane Wyman and Jack Carson.

 

4:30 p.m. "Lone Star" (1952)--Watchable western with Clark Gable and Ava Gardner.  Gardner gets to sing 1-2 songs with her own voice, if I remember correctly.

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Looking at tomorrow, Wednesday September 27, I noticed this one:

 

Night Unto Night (1949) 11:30 AM ET - A terminally ill scientist finds comfort in the arms of a mentally disturbed woman. Starring Ronald Reagan and Viveca Lindfors! Directed by Don Siegel! With Brod Crawford and Peter Gunn! This sounds too good to be true...is it?

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Wednesday, Sept. 27th--all times E.S.T.:

 

 

4:30 p.m. "Lone Star" (1952)--Watchable western with Clark Gable and Ava Gardner.  Gardner gets to sing 1-2 songs with her own voice, if I remember correctly.

You do remember correctly, and this film is very entertaining.

 

According to Hedda Hopper, her good friend William Farnum (who helped her get her start in films and plays a senator in this one) served as a technical adviser for the climactic fight scene between Gable and Broderick Crawford.

 

Although this sounds silly (Farnum was in his mid 70s by then, and this would be his second-to-last film appearance), Hopper may have been telling the truth. In almost every one of his silent films, Farnum had a fight scene, with his most famous taking place in The Spoilers (1914). When that film was remade in 1930 with Gary Cooper, Farnum did serve as a technical adviser for the big fight between Cooper and William "Stage" Boyd. He also appeared as a spectator in the crowd.

 

In Lone Star, Farnum gives an energetic and spirited performance, and seems to be enjoying himself ... not a bad way to wrap up a long career.

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Tomorrow I'm recording Tender is the Night (1962) 12:45 AM ET - I want to see it for Jason Robards. I've heard of it, but nothing about it.

 

How long is it been since Michael McKean and Annette O'Toole were guest hosts?

 

They were so terrific, and their introductions were so inspiring, I watched quite a few films I would not normally have because of them: one of which was LONG DAYS JOURNEY...from '62.

 

it totally turned my opinion of Jason Robards on its head. I grew up in the 80s watching him in films like SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES and (shudder)DREAM A LITTLE DREAM and sort of assumed that he ALWAYS played cranky old bastards who hated life.

 

Maybe later on in his career he did, but early on at least he was a sensational actor, or at least he is sensational in JOURNEY...

 

I have not seen TENDER EST DER NACHT, but I have read the book and I was really, reaaaaally unimpressed.

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Lorna, if you've never seen Robards in Peckinpah's surprisingly non-violent(for the most part) little western The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970), one viewing of it might further contribute to your change of heart about the actor and the image of him you said you used to have.

 

(...this film about the end of the wild west era was also one of Peckinpah's favorites) 

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Lorna, if you've never seen Robards in Peckinpah's surprisingly non-violent(for the most part) little western The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970), one viewing of it might further contribute to your change of heart about the actor and the image of him you said you used to have.

 

(...this film about the end of the wild west era was also one of Peckinpah's favorites) 

 

It's been some time since I saw 'The Ballad of Cable Hogue', but I remember liking it.  Robards was a good actor.  He and Bacall might have stayed together longer than they did if he'd been able to get a handle on his drinking problem.

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How long is it been since Michael McKean and Annette O'Toole were guest hosts?

 

They were so terrific, and their introductions were so inspiring, I watched quite a few films I would not normally have because of them: one of which was LONG DAYS JOURNEY...from '62.

 

it totally turned my opinion of Jason Robards on its head. I grew up in the 80s watching him in films like SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES and (shudder)DREAM A LITTLE DREAM and sort of assumed that he ALWAYS played cranky old bastards who hated life.

 

Maybe later on in his career he did, but early on at least he was a sensational actor, or at least he is sensational in JOURNEY...

 

I have not seen TENDER EST DER NACHT, but I have read the book and I was really, reaaaaally unimpressed.

 

 

Well, the film isnt all that great either. Too long.

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Thursday, September 28/29

 

2 a.m.  The Big Cube (1969).  Lana Turner on acid?  Come on, man.  I can just see the execs brainstorming this one.  Let’s cash in on this LSD craze.  Who can we get?  Lana Turner!

 

3:45 a.m.  More (1969)  by Barbet Schroeder.  Might be interesting.

 
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Thursday, September 28/29

 

3:45 a.m.  More (1969)  by Barbet Schroeder.  Might be interesting.

 

More is mainly remembered for the score composed by Pink Floyd. I've never seen it all, so I'll record it. I'll also record:

 

The Love-Ins (1967) 8:00 PM ET

Riot On Sunset Strip (1967) 10:00 PM ET

 

I haven't seen these two yet.

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Lorna, if you've never seen Robards in Peckinpah's surprisingly non-violent(for the most part) little western The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970), one viewing of it might further contribute to your change of heart about the actor and the image of him you said you used to have.

 

(...this film about the end of the wild west era was also one of Peckinpah's favorites)

 

Thank you! In his book ALTERNATE OSCARS, author Danny Peary gives both CABLE HOGUE and ROBARDS "alternate" nominations for best pic and actor, so it's been on my to see list...

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Thursday, Sept. 28th/29th--all times E.S.T.:

 

6:00 a.m. "Ladies of the Jury" (1932)--Edna May Oliver is the lone holdout jury member in a murder trial: Oliver is the show.

 

9:40 p.m. "LSD: Insight or Insanity?" (1967)--Sal Mineo narrated short film.

 

2:00 a.m. "The Big Cube" (1969)--I second Bogie56's recommendation--Lana and LSD.

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Friday, Sept. 29th--all times E.S.T.:

 

8:00 a.m. "Cry Wolf" (1947)--Barbara Stanwyck/Errol Flynn thriller Maltin dislikes--so I'll watch it.

 

3:45 a.m. "What Price Hollywood?" (1932)--Cukor directed comedy/drama that was the inspiration for the "A Star Is Born" movies (1937, 54, & 76).

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Friday, Sept. 29th--all times E.S.T.:

 

8:00 a.m. "Cry Wolf" (1947)--Barbara Stanwyck/Errol Flynn thriller Maltin dislikes--so I'll watch it.

 

3:45 a.m. "What Price Hollywood?" (1932)--Cukor directed comedy/drama that was the inspiration for the "A Star Is Born" movies (1937, 54, & 76).

 

Yes, if Maltin doesn't like it it's probably worth seeing.

 

What Price Hollywood? - the original is still the greatest.  I am also very fond of the Janet Gaynor - Fred March A Star is Born.  It's a cool idea for TCM to run them all together.

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three really good ones in a row starting around 8:00 am tomorrow morning...

 

THE YOUNG AT HEART (1938) I think this was Janet Gaynor's last film and it's a real charmer that before it was featured as one of Bob's Picks, I'd never heard of. Very well-acted all around and The Flying Wombat must be seen to be believed...

 

then

 

THE MYSTERY OF THE WAX MUSEUM- the 1933 Lionel Atwill version...worth catching for the photography, an early(?) form of minimalist technicolor that actually works well for horror films (this and DOCTOR X were shot in it)

 

and then if you got a looooot of time

 

MARIE ANTIONETTE (1938)- Norma Shearer's finest hour...well, finest three hours. With about 10 minutes of Tyrone Power, too little Gladys George and just enough Joseph Schildkraut as The Wicked Witch d'Orleans.

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