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HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM


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I'll cast a vote to encourage people to watch "The Actress" at 8 p.m. Eastern.  Jean Simmons is annoying,

 

I chalked it up to Simmons' just imitating Ruth Gordon. I thought she did an excellent job imitating mannerisms and especially with her speaking cadence, just like Gordon.

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Saturday, October 7/8

 

2 a.m.  Night of the Strangler (1975).  It wouldn’t be Mickey Dolenz, would it?

 

5:15 a.m.  Narcotics Pit of Despair (Part 1) (1967).  Whatever happened to part two?

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Saturday, October 7/8

 

2 a.m.  Night of the Strangler (1975).  It wouldn’t be Mickey Dolenz, would it?

 

5:15 a.m.  Narcotics Pit of Despair (Part 1) (1967).  Whatever happened to part two?

 

Night of the Strangler has been pulled from the schedule.

 

In the U.S. we have After Hours (highly recommended) followed by Who's That Girl (not so much), while in Canadia, you guys and gals get After Hours and that modern classic Heavenly Bodies.

 

Both schedules have changed the following short to Summer of '63 (1963), about randy teenagers swapping spit and syphilis. Bummer, man.

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Saturday, Oct. 7th/8th.  All times E.S.T.:

 

6:15 a.m. "The Woman From Monte Carlo" (1932)--Lil Dagover's ( star of 1920's "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari) only American film.  Michael Curtiz directed, Walter Huston and Warren William costarred.  Despite Maltin's rating, sounds like it's worth a look, at the least.

 

midnight. "Wind Across the Everglades" (1958)--Oddball cast includes Burl Ives, Gypsy Rose Lee, and Christopher Plummer.  Directed by Nicholas Ray.  

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Saturday, Oct. 7th/8th.  All times E.S.T.:

 

6:15 a.m. "The Woman From Monte Carlo" (1932)--Lil Dagover's ( star of 1920's "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari) only American film.  Michael Curtiz directed, Walter Huston and Warren William costarred.  Despite Maltin's rating, sounds like it's worth a look, at the least.

 

midnight. "Wind Across the Everglades" (1958)--Oddball cast includes Burl Ives, Gypsy Rose Lee, and Christopher Plummer.  Directed by Nicholas Ray. 

 

I'll be recording those two as well, the former to see Dagover in English, as well as for Huston, and the latter for director Ray.

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Sunday, October 8

 

2:15 p.m.  My Blood Runs Cold (1965).  With Troy Donahue and Joey Heatherton.  Isn’t she the sister of Lola ‘I want to have your baby’ Heatherton?

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Tomorrow, October 8, has a few titles of note:

 

A trio of Dracula films starting at 8:00 PM ET -

 

The Return of Dracula (1958) with Francis Lederer as the count. This is a passable B movie, but Lederer looks bored. Whenever I see his name, this is the first movie I think of.

 

House of Dracula (1945) was the last of the original cycle Universal horrors with the exception of the Abbott & Costello movie. Jane Adams as Nina the Hunchback and Skelton Knaggs as Steinmuhl are highlights.

 

Billy the Kid vs Dracula (1966) is routinely listed as one of the worst movies of all time. Watch it and decide for yourself!

 

On TCM Imports there's an interesting double-bill:

 

Jigoku (1960) - A graphic depiction of Hell, Japanese-style. My recommendation for the day.

 

Tokaido Yotsuya Kaidan (1959) aka The Ghost of Yotsuya - I haven't seen this vengeful ghost film. 

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Tonight's Burl Ives tribute: Day of the Outlaw is an outstanding film, a western set in the snow, expertly directed by Andre de Toth. Burl Ives has one of the best entrances in any film, and he would be my choice for Best Supporting Actor for this year. Robert Ryan, as usual, is outstanding in the lead role. Ryan and Ives both play complex characters.

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In re: BILLY THE KID VS DRACULA

 

Actually, I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say that it's not one of the worst films I have ever seen, and I have seen some terrrrrrrrrrrible films. There is one moment that comes at the very end that is absolutely hilarious- when I saw the movie online, I kept rewinding and watching it over and over again. I have a very strong suspicion that there was no rehearsal of the final confrontation scene between the title characters, because the actor who plays Billy the Kid lobs a prop (?) gun at John Carradine which as I remember it, hits him in the head.

 

Oh John, THE GRAPES OF WRATH Was a long time ago, wasn't it?

 

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=x2UfSB6MiIk

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Monday, October 9

 

8 p.m.  The Big Sleep (1946)  You can’t go wrong with Bogie and Bacall.

 

Moody and sexy, with sporadic moments of violence, Hawks' take on Chandler is one of my favourites, confusing screenplay aside. I get more of a kick out of this private eye thriller than I do talk fest Maltese Falcon, even though that film does have a once in a lifetime cast.

 

Bogie's Philip Marlowe is the closest he came to playing a James Bond-type magnet for the chicks. Man can't even wander into a book store without a beauty doffing her glasses and letting down her long hair for him. And where, oh where, do you find cab drivers like the one Marlowe has in this film? All that and Bacall, too.

 

6934f6468aa99af51dd29d4878003b04--smoke-

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Moody and sexy, with sporadic moments of violence, Hawks' take on Chandler is one of my favourites, confusing screenplay aside. I get more of a kick out of this private eye thriller than I do talk fest Maltese Falcon, even though that film does have a once in a lifetime cast.

 

Bogie's Philip Marlowe is the closest he came to playing a James Bond-type magnet for the chicks. Man can't even wander into a book store without a beauty doffing her glasses and letting down her long hair for him. And where, oh where, do you find cab drivers like the one Marlowe has in this film? All that and Bacall, too.

 

 

I have heard about the confusing screenplay before, but never understood it.  Every time I watch the movie, it makes sense to me.  At least as much as any other Noir or mystery from the period.

Maybe it's just that I want it to make sense and therefore mentally fill in the blanks.

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I have heard about the confusing screenplay before, but never understood it.  Every time I watch the movie, it makes sense to me.  At least as much as any other Noir or mystery from the period.

Maybe it's just that I want it to make sense and therefore mentally fill in the blanks.

 

To me the story line is merely the frame work upon which to hang some exciting scenes and dialogue banter and performances. This film works! The fact that I don't understand the plot completely really doesn't bother me at all. And the fact you get the story more than I do, Cid, I say bravo to you.

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Monday, Oct. 9th--Musicals.  All times E.S.T.

 

Noon. "Les Girls" (1957)--TCM recently showed this, but buried it at 3-4:00 in the a.m.  Now it's showing at a reasonable time.

 

7:30 p.m. "Paree, Paree" (1934)--A 20 minute version of Cole Porters' "50 Million Frenchmen", short is almost all sung;  contains the songs "Paree, What Did You Do To Me?", "You Don't Know Paree" (instrumental), "You Do Something To Me", "You've Got That Thing", "Find Me A Primitive Man", plus an Apache Dance.  List of songs is from imdb.  Starring Bob Hope and Dorothy Stone.

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Tuesday, Oct. 10th/11th--Val Lewton night; all times E.S.T.:

 

11:00 p.m. "Martin Scorsese Presents, Val Lewton: The Man in the Shadows" (2007)--TCM documentary I haven't seen, but sounds like a must-see.

 

12:30 a.m. "I Walked With A Zombie" (1943)--Jacques Tourneur directed beautiful nightmare of a film.

 

5:00 a.m. "The Leopard Man" (1943)--A killer is on the loose in a New Mexico town.

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Tuesday, Oct. 10th/11th--Val Lewton night; all times E.S.T.:

12:30 a.m. "I Walked With A Zombie" (1943)--Jacques Tourneur directed beautiful nightmare of a film.

 

 

 

I find the Val Lewton films uneven, never seeing a single one of them that I find completely satisfactory. But, boy, do they have their moments that make the viewing worthwhile.

 

i-walked-with-a-zombie-sugar-cane-field-

 

The sequence depicting the walk through the sugar cane field in I Walked With A Zombie is a beautiful illustration of an appeal to a viewer's primal fears. The hypnotic camerawork combined with the sounds of the wind and the rustling of the sugar cane stalks as the heroine leads a woman under a spell to a voodoo ceremony ranks, for me, as an eerie masterpiece. We're in a strange foreign midnight world here where you feel that anything might happen.

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Tuesday, Oct. 10th/11th--Val Lewton night; all times E.S.T.:

 

11:00 p.m. "Martin Scorsese Presents, Val Lewton: The Man in the Shadows" (2007)--TCM documentary I haven't seen, but sounds like a must-see.

 

12:30 a.m. "I Walked With A Zombie" (1943)--Jacques Tourneur directed beautiful nightmare of a film.

 

5:00 a.m. "The Leopard Man" (1943)--A killer is on the loose in a New Mexico town.

 

Be sure to check out the Val Lewton TCM doc.  I've seen it a couple of times.  Martin Scorsese does an excellent job.  If your a Val Lewton fan or fan of classic horror beyond Universal, it's a must-see.

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For domestic drama, I can recommend The Light in the Piazza. Olivia De Havilland faces a double dilemma when her mentally challenged daughter (Yvette Mimieux) attracts the attention of a handsome young Italian (George Hamilton). The young man's father (Rossano Brazzi) seems to be falling for Olivia, as well.

 

For over-the-top camp, there's Two Weeks in Another Town. Many talented people are involved, but something went dreadfully wrong. The script would be Culprit #1.

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Be sure to check out the Val Lewton TCM doc.  I've seen it a couple of times.  Martin Scorsese does an excellent job.  If your a Val Lewton fan or fan of classic horror beyond Universal, it's a must-see.

 

It's from the Warner DVD boxset (which disk?), and it's a good overview.  

Martin Scorsese has found such a niche as TCM's highbrow prestige movie-historian, it makes you want to punch all those wags making the same danged "Where's the gangsters, Marty?" joke about his extended Georges Melies tribute in "Hugo" (2011)

 

I find the Val Lewton films uneven, never seeing a single one of them that I find completely satisfactory. But, boy, do they have their moments that make the viewing worthwhile.

The sequence depicting the walk through the sugar cane field in I Walked With A Zombie is a beautiful illustration of an appeal to a viewer's primal fears. The hypnotic camerawork combined with the sounds of the wind and the rustling of the sugar cane stalks as the heroine leads a woman under a spell to a voodoo ceremony ranks, for me, as an eerie masterpiece. We're in a strange foreign midnight world here where you feel that anything might happen.

 

The Leopard Man is not without its iconically button-pushing Lewton nightmare moments, either:

leopardman2.jpg

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The Leopard Man is not without its iconically button-pushing Lewton nightmare moments, either:

leopardman2.jpg

 

Absolutely! The scene with the little girl pursued through the streets by (a killer big cat?), banging in desperation on her mother's door is one of the classic moments from Lewton films.

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I find the Val Lewton films uneven, never seeing a single one of them that I find completely satisfactory. But, boy, do they have their moments that make the viewing worthwhile.

 

i-walked-with-a-zombie-sugar-cane-field-

 

The sequence depicting the walk through the sugar cane field in I Walked With A Zombie is a beautiful illustration of an appeal to a viewer's primal fears. The hypnotic camerawork combined with the sounds of the wind and the rustling of the sugar cane stalks as the heroine leads a woman under a spell to a voodoo ceremony ranks, for me, as an eerie masterpiece. We're in a strange foreign midnight world here where you feel that anything might happen.

My wife and I both enjoy fairly often re-watching I Walked With a Zombie.  Have it on DVD.

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