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HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM


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Tuesday, August 25

 

10 a.m.  The First Hundred Years (1938).  Good cast in this one.  Virginia Bruce with Robert Montgomery and Warren William.

 

6:30 p.m.  Kongo (1932).  I haven’t seen this one.  I love Walter Huston and I really loved Lon Chaney in West of Zanzibar so I am really curious to see this remake.

 
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Tuesday, August 25

 

10 a.m.  The First Hundred Years (1938).  Good cast in this one.  Virginia Bruce with Robert Montgomery and Warren William.

 

6:30 p.m.  Kongo (1932).  I haven’t seen this one.  I love Walter Huston and I really loved Lon Chaney in West of Zanzibar so I am really curious to see this remake.

Kongo is a crazy film! A remake, as you've noted, of West of Zanzibar. Enjoy it -- but beware Pre-Code kinkiness!

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Tuesday, August 25

 

10 a.m.  The First Hundred Years (1938).  Good cast in this one.  Virginia Bruce with Robert Montgomery and Warren William.

 

6:30 p.m.  Kongo (1932).  I haven’t seen this one.  I love Walter Huston and I really loved Lon Chaney in West of Zanzibar so I am really curious to see this remake.

Every time I see Kongo I am knocked out by by the sheer perversity of it.  It's a stunner and a tour de force for Walter Huston.

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I'm so looking forward to [so nobody call me then!] tonights' showing of the John Gilbert film called "Downstairs" with Paul Lukas and Virginia Bruce.

 

Now even though Bette Davis I think called Paul Lukas an "old Nazi" I still like to see his films but it is really Gilbert I'm into.

 

And after that John Barrymore chews his way through all the scenery in "The Invisible Woman" with Virginia Bruce which is fun. And Wednesday has all those wonderful Garbo flicks though I will say "The Painted Veil" does not really follow well the Somerset Maugham classic tale.

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I'm so looking forward to [so nobody call me then!] tonights' showing of the John Gilbert film called "Downstairs" with Paul Lukas and Virginia Bruce.

 

Now even though Bette Davis I think called Paul Lukas an "old Nazi" I still like to see his films but it is really Gilbert I'm into.

 

And after that John Barrymore chews his way through all the scenery in "The Invisible Woman" with Virginia Bruce which is fun. And Wednesday has all those wonderful Garbo flicks though I will say "The Painted Veil" does not really follow well the Somerset Maugham classic tale.

 

What do you think of the later version of TPV with Ed Norton and Naomi Watts? Faithful to Maugham or not? I haven't read the book so I wouldn't know but I enjoyed this later version.

 

I'm recording four of the Garbo silents including The Painted Veil (haven't seen). Also A Woman of Affairs and The Temptress (this latter I've seen and really love it) I prefer the silent Garbo over the talkie Garbo.

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Lafitte, I did actually see the Naomi Watts version and it actually does conform more to the Maugham version, so in that sense I liked it.

 

Now don't get me wrong, even with it being a bit off, I love the Garbo version just because it is Garbo.

 

Most times the small changes of a book don't bother me, but in Maugham's case they do since he was such a consummate story teller and had obviously worked hard to construct stories of some substance and deeper meaning which are often subverted by filmmakers I feel.

 

Imagine my deep chagrin when after having seen a movie I love "The Letter" with Bette Davis, I finally read the book and realized that some major plot lines had been changed. Why I almost cried, as while reading it I kept looking forward to seeing the lines that came out of Bette's mouth repeated at penultimate points of the drama.

 

But I digress, anything by Maugham is better than most teleplays by lesser talents, even when changed a bit. Enjoy your day with the divine Garbo!

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I'm so looking forward to [so nobody call me then!] tonights' showing of the John Gilbert film called "Downstairs" with Paul Lukas and Virginia Bruce.

 

Now even though Bette Davis I think called Paul Lukas an "old Nazi" I still like to see his films but it is really Gilbert I'm into.

 

And after that John Barrymore chews his way through all the scenery in "The Invisible Woman" with Virginia Bruce which is fun. And Wednesday has all those wonderful Garbo flicks though I will say "The Painted Veil" does not really follow well the Somerset Maugham classic tale.

Paul Lukas was Jewish an not an "old nazi". He became ill with memory lapses and it's been said that he lashed out during these episodes. So I wouldn't worry about "seeing his films"

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What do you think of the later version of TPV with Ed Norton and Naomi Watts? Faithful to Maugham or not? I haven't read the book so I wouldn't know but I enjoyed this later version.

 

I'm recording four of the Garbo silents including The Painted Veil (haven't seen). Also A Woman of Affairs and The Temptress (this latter I've seen and really love it) I prefer the silent Garbo over the talkie Garbo.

A Woman Of Affairs is a wonderful film. One of my favorite silents and a favorite of the Garbo films. Wish I had TCM right now, I'd really enjoy seeing the Painted Veil and the Temptress (another one I love) Lucky duck,watch them and enjoy them for me  :)

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A Woman Of Affairs is a wonderful film. One of my favorite silents and a favorite of the Garbo films. Wish I had TCM right now, I'd really enjoy seeing the Painted Veil and the Temptress (another one I love) Lucky duck,watch them and enjoy them for me  :)

 

I shall, I shall, dear Lavender ... and I will send good vibes your way. Quack, quack.

:)

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I'm recording four of the Garbo silents including The Painted Veil (haven't seen). Also A Woman of Affairs and The Temptress (this latter I've seen and really love it) I prefer the silent Garbo over the talkie Garbo.

 

Then maybe you're in for a disappointment, because THE PAINTED VEIL is a talkie, made in 1934. Don't know if it's just barely pre- or just barely post- Hayes Code.

 

(I'm also looking forward to it.)

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Wednesday, August 26

 

I’m a Garbo fan so I’m glad to grab copies of some of these …

 

11:30 a.m.  Susan Lennox (1931)

2:30 p.m.  The Painted Veil (1934)

4:45 a.m.  the Kiss (1929)

 

I’m not sure why the Garbo documentary at 3:45 a.m. is not available in Canada.  

 
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Wednesday, August 26th--All times E.S.T.:

 

8:00 a.m.--"Flesh and the Devil"--(1927)--Garbo & Gilbert's 1st film together.

 

4:00 p.m.--"Conquest"--(1937)--Garbo & Boyer in Napoleonic times.

 

4:45 a.m.--"The Kiss"--(1929)--Garbo's last silent, Lew Ayres 1st starring film.

 

 

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Thursday, August 27

 

Monty Woolley and no The Pied Piper (1942) ?

 

All is not lost.  Watch Gracie Fields in ….

 

8 p.m.  Holy Matrimony (1943) and

9:45 p.m.  Molly and Me (1945)

 
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Thursday, August 27

 

Monty Woolley and no The Pied Piper (1942) ?

 

All is not lost.  Watch Gracie Fields in ….

 

8 p.m.  Holy Matrimony (1943) and

9:45 p.m.  Molly and Me (1945)

Still waiting for Our Gracie in Sing as We Go, Sally in Our Alley, Shipyard Sally, etc. (Although I do love Molly and Me).

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A musical, a classic, & a film I remember from 10+ years ago: all times E.S.T.:

 

6:00 p.m.--"Kismet"--(1955)--Well sung musical--Monty Wooley gets 4th billing as a comic relief sheik.

 

11:45 p.m.--"The Man Who Came to Dinner"--(1941)--classic comedy, if anyone hasn't seen/taped it.

 

 

                           An enigma;

 

You know how some films are so very well done in one department, & how the rest of the film is tripe? Here's one, IMHO.

 

3:45 a.m.--"Girl of the Golden West"--(1938)--A well sung Sigmund Romberg score & 2 dances by a young Buddy Ebsen are evened out by dreadful accents from Jeanette MacDonald & Nelson Eddy--MacDonalds performance is not good, & Eddy's is worse--but the film has received rapturous reviews on its' TCM webpage--I remember score & Ebsens' dancing as the only redeeming features.  You decide.

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A musical, a classic, & a film I remember from 10+ years ago: all times E.S.T.:

 

6:00 p.m.--"Kismet"--(1955)--Well sung musical--Monty Wooley gets 4th billing as a comic relief sheik.

 

11:45 p.m.--"The Man Who Came to Dinner"--(1941)--classic comedy, if anyone hasn't seen/taped it.

 

 

                           An enigma;

 

You know how some films are so very well done in one department, & how the rest of the film is tripe? Here's one, IMHO.

 

3:45 a.m.--"Girl of the Golden West"--(1938)--A well sung Sigmund Romberg score & 2 dances by a young Buddy Ebsen are evened out by dreadful accents from Jeanette MacDonald & Nelson Eddy--MacDonalds performance is not good, & Eddy's is worse--but the film has received rapturous reviews on its' TCM webpage--I remember score & Ebsens' dancing as the only redeeming features.  You decide.

After seeing "San Francisco" a few months ago, I cannot watch anything else with Jeanette MacDonald. She might possibly be the most irritating actress I have ever seen. Her singing was worse. Ick. I was hoping a building would fall on her during the Great Earthquake or maybe when she started singing again, Clark Gable would just put himself (and us) out our misery, and he'd shoot her. No such luck on both accounts.

 

If she's even worse in the film Bogie mentioned, then ick. Count me out.

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11:45 p.m.--"The Man Who Came to Dinner"--(1941)--classic comedy, if anyone hasn't seen/taped it.

An enigma;You know how some films are so very well done in one department, & how the rest of the film is tripe? Here's one, IMHO.

 

You want to expand on this?

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A musical, a classic, & a film I remember from 10+ years ago: all times E.S.T.:

 

6:00 p.m.--"Kismet"--(1955)--Well sung musical--Monty Wooley gets 4th billing as a comic relief sheik.

 

11:45 p.m.--"The Man Who Came to Dinner"--(1941)--classic comedy, if anyone hasn't seen/taped it.

 

 

                           An enigma;

 

You know how some films are so very well done in one department, & how the rest of the film is tripe? Here's one, IMHO.

 

3:45 a.m.--"Girl of the Golden West"--(1938)--A well sung Sigmund Romberg score & 2 dances by a young Buddy Ebsen are evened out by dreadful accents from Jeanette MacDonald & Nelson Eddy--MacDonalds performance is not good, & Eddy's is worse--but the film has received rapturous reviews on its' TCM webpage--I remember score & Ebsens' dancing as the only redeeming features.  You decide.

Nelson and Jeanette can't act. Some thought they could sing - hence the TCM reviews, no doubt - but I thought they stunk.

 

BTW, you can't trust TCM reviews, they are usually rapturous about everything.

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Friday, August 28

 

"Here's looking at you kid"

 

Ingrid Bergman.  Born August 29, 1915 in Stockholm, Sweden.

 

1 p.m.  Fear (1954)

 

2:30  Elena and Her Men (1956)  … I haven’t seen either of these

 

8 p.m.  Casablanca.  I caught Casablanca on the big screen last weekend as part of an Ingrid Bergman tribute here in Toronto.  Lots of weeping in this one.  I even noticed that old Bogie had a wet cheekbone when his train was pulling out of Paris and he has tossed Ilsa's 'dear john' letter into the gutter.

 

midnight.  Europa ’51 (1951).  A non-dubbed English language version of this is hard to come by so I’m setting the recorder.  Alexander Knox is good.  From Strathroy, Ontario.

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All times E.S.T.:

 

8:00 a.m.--"Under Capricorn"--(1949)--Underrated Hitchcock film that I will be seeing a clean copy of for the 1st time--when I first  saw film on VHS, background roar drowned out Michael Wilding's voice--Hitchcock continued his experimentation with 10 minute takes that started with "Rope" (1948).  Ingrid Bergman's 10 minute monologue is excellent.

 

3:30 a.m.--"Saratoga Trunk"--(1945)--Gets a 1 & 1/2 star rating from Maltin--have not seen before, so I'm going to watch--may be good, may be bad--Ingrid Bergman, Gary Cooper, & Flora Robson can't be That bad--anyway, watch/record at own risk.  Don't say you weren't warned. :)

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3:30 a.m.--"Saratoga Trunk"--(1945)--Gets a 1 & 1/2 star rating from Maltin--have not seen before, so I'm going to watch--may be good, may be bad--Ingrid Bergman, Gary Cooper, & Flora Robson can't be That bad--anyway, watch/record at own risk.  Don't say you weren't warned. :)

Gary Cooper had been one of the actors under consideration for the role of Rhett Butler. Saratoga Trunk is the closest that he would come to playing that role as he plays Col. Clint Maroon here. Coop's pretty good in the part, too, in my opinion, just as the film also has stunning art direction and costumes (this film New Orleans looks spectacular). The film also has one of the best musical scores of Max Steiner's career.

 

On the other hand, Saratoga Trunk goes on too long, has a largely dull screenplay and Ingrid Bergman's character gets excruciatingly on my nerves. Just as I couldn't understand why Rhett put up with so much bull from Scarlett, I couldn't understand why Cooper's character remains enthralled with Bergman's scheming manipulator.

 

The casting of esteemed English character actress Flora Robson (she had been a magnificent Queen Elizabeth in two film productions) as Bergman's black servant here is pretty embarrassing by current politically correct standards (or just good taste, in general).

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It's odd that Ingrid Bergman who was born AND died on August 29 is being celebrated by TCM on August 28.  The 29th would have been her 100th birthday.

Agreed.  I thought it was strange that Bergman was scheduled on the 28th instead of 29th.  There's no reason she and George C. Scott couldn't have been switched.

 

TCM on Facebook's little daily blurb showing the artwork featuring the SUTS honoree and a little factoid talk says: "Celebrate Bergman's 100th birthday year today during Summer Under the Stars."

 

I don't have to work tomorrow (yay!) and it's supposed to be rainy and windy all day tomorrow (double yay!) so I think I'll have myself an Ingrid Bergman birthday tribute.

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