Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM


Recommended Posts

For a couple years ca. 1991, I was TRIGGERED BY DUSTIN HOFFMAN, But that was entirely because of HOOK.

He is absolutely one of the best actors ever, But he is on the record admitting to something that is illegal and downright wrong in an interview with playboy. And I’ll just leave it at that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding Hoffman's films, I did check out 1992's Hero (airing early Sunday) earlier in the year, and it is worth catching despite the mixed reviews and poor box office. It might be more relevant today. Sure it gets soppy toward the end and its overly reminicent of Meet John Doe, but its a pretty audacious mainstream offering for the early 90s. For here you have a film where your "hero" is a disagreeable, short tempered thief, its traditional leading man has his entire stalwart reputation built on a lie, and the leading lady is willing to clamp down on the truth. Plus it skewers "inspirational" news pieces well.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, mr6666 said:

Yeah, that’s some of it. But the article you linked to, in so far as I read, doesn’t mention the interview he gave to “playboy” magazine ca. 1980 where he tells a story about losing his virginity that is a story of a de facto rape...(It’s gross, he used a false identity with one of his brothers girlfriends. She thought he was his brother. He was also, I think, under the age of 15 at the time.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Sunday, August 25

RSF86425_7e4fd249-9c44-42a0-b131-9bfca2e

6 a.m.  The Tiger Makes Out (1967).  With Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson.

 

MV5BMjEyOTc2NTEwNF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwODg2

2:45 p.m.  Papillon (1973).  There are a lot of good Dustin Hoffman performances to choose from today but for this one he really deserved a supporting actor Oscar.

 
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/20/2019 at 7:00 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

In looking up MISS MAGUIRE on IMDb, I see quite a few titles I’ve never seen- would love to see MISTER 880. 

In the films of hers that I have seen though, “...BROOKLYN”, “FRIENDLY PERSUASION “, “a summer place”,” gentlemen’s  agreement”, even “the enchanted cottage” in which yes she is good, and most especially “the spiral staircase”- I feel as if she is holding something back.

Like, there’s a possibility it was misdirection in some cases, but still I feel as if she’s too subdued. God help me for this, but if I had ever been one of her directors I probably would’ve grabbed her Bette Davis on Miriam Hopkins “old acquaintance” style and shaken her repeatedly.

This is neither here nor there, but she reminds me very much of the actress who plays BESSIE the devoted maid in “Laura.”

I think Dorothy Maguire would probably have been terrific if she had ever gotten kind of a “Bea Arthur, tough old broad who hates life” TV role in her later years.

If you get a chance to watch it, Dorothy McGuire played the mother to Peter Strauss and Nick Nolte in "Rich Man, Poor Man" which is considered the television show that kicked off the mini-series boom from the early 1970's to the mid- or late 80's.  McGuire's character was married to Ed Asner...how's that for a romantic coupling!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

He was also, I think, under the age of 15 at the time.

So technically she would have been committing statutory rape?

Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, Fedya said:

So technically she would have been committing statutory rape?

Unwittingly so, yes. 

It was a bad enough situation that it happened, but the fact that he bragged about it to a magazine in an interview and put it out there for the public to know so casually is...blegh

But this is BOGIE’s thread and I’m shutting up about it hence forth.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/16/2019 at 8:14 PM, TomJH said:

Saturday, August 17 Errol Flynn Day

10:15 pm (EST) GENTLEMAN JIM

images-annex20-20flynn20errol20gentleman

Errol Flynn's favourite film. He was never better, a milestone in the career of director Raoul Walsh, as well. The scene in which John L. Sullivan (memorably played by Ward Bond in what may have been the role of his career) congratulates a victorious Jim Corbett remains genuinely touching in its honest sentimentality.

Spot on about this scene, Tom.  It's one of the very few in a movie that almost gets me to choke up.  I hadn't seen "Gentleman Jim" for quite some time until it aired on Errol Flynn's SUTS day, and I couldn't remember if this scene had been done by both actors in a side room of the place where Corbett was celebrating his victory.  Instead, it was in fact shot in the grand reception area in front of a room full of people.  I wondered how many takes they had to do to get the finished product of this particular scene.  It's a wonder no one of the extras broke down and cried if it were done in one take...or bust up laughing if either Flynn or Ward Bond messed up and they had to shoot multiple takes.

The following scene between Flynn and Alexis Smith in the garden after Bond has exited the party was particularly poignant too, before it degenerated into the playful insults and name-calling both characters had displayed throughout other parts of the film.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, midwestan said:

Spot on about this scene, Tom.  It's one of the very few in a movie that almost gets me to choke up.  I hadn't seen "Gentleman Jim" for quite some time until it aired on Errol Flynn's SUTS day, and I couldn't remember if this scene had been done by both actors in a side room of the place where Corbett was celebrating his victory.  Instead, it was in fact shot in the grand reception area in front of a room full of people.  I wondered how many takes they had to do to get the finished product of this particular scene.  It's a wonder no one of the extras broke down and cried if it were done in one take...or bust up laughing if either Flynn or Ward Bond messed up and they had to shoot multiple takes.

The following scene between Flynn and Alexis Smith in the garden after Bond has exited the party was particularly poignant too, before it degenerated into the playful insults and name-calling both characters had displayed throughout other parts of the film.

Gentleman Jim has always been a special film to me, a rollicking, rambunctious, high spirited affair with a cast that seem to be having the time of their lives. But the congratulatory scene between Sullivan and Corbett is particularly touching. Raoul Walsh made a point of proudly discussing this scene in his autobiography.

By the way there was no such amiability between the real Corbett and Sullivan after the fight. They still detested one another. Sullivan by the time of their fight was largely washed up as a fighter (he had been an alcoholic for years). They would finally shake hands 18 years after their fight at the Jack Johnson-Jim Jeffries championship match, but they only did it when the cameras were rolling to capture the moment.

-picture-id530844590

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Notice:

There's an AMAZING resemblance to the real Sullivan and WARD BOND, while there's NO resemblance of ANY KIND of the real Corbett to ERROL FLYNN.

Sepiatone

Here's a shot of Corbett in his fighting prime. A bit more of a Flynn resemblance then.

James-j-corbett-333.jpg

9de9432b67254efa1a99bf8c4f5a48a5.jpg

The real Corbett, though, was a quiet "gentlemanly" type, not the brash ****-of-the-walk that Flynn played. Corbett, by the way, made most of his money as a stage actor, not a boxer.

The real Gentleman Jim came within a fraction of being the first man to win the heavyweight crown for a second time in 1900. He was miles ahead on points against champ Jim Jeffries (a former sparring partner of his) in a 25 rounder, but got knocked out in the 23rd round.

  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, TomJH said:

Here's a shot of Corbett in his fighting prime. A bit more of a Flynn resemblance then.

James-j-corbett-333.jpg

 

 

Actually, this shot of the real Corbett facially reminds me more of MICHAEL RENNIE. 

Sepiatone

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd recommend A Successful Calamity (12:30 PM, I believe), for George Arliss' performance.  Warner Bros. kept putting him in very lightweight stuff, but he always took it and ran with it, making the stuff much more watchable than it has any right to be.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Tuesday, August 27

the-westerner.jpg

8 p.m.  The Westerner (1940).  Walter Brennan’s Judge Roy Bean is one of the best supporting performances of all time.  Gary Cooper is no slouch either.

 
  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Tuesday, August 27

the-westerner.jpg

8 p.m.  The Westerner (1940).  Walter Brennan’s Judge Roy Bean is one of the best supporting performances of all time.  Gary Cooper is no slouch either.

 

Cooper and Brennan have memorable chemistry in one of director William Wyler's few westerns. Coop's "common man" persona, while also playing an heroic figure, is at a peak here, while Brennan is an ornery rattlesnake with unexpected moments of humour mixed in.

Leading lady Doris Davenport has very nice chemistry with Cooper, as well. The actress was a tragic figure, though. Shortly after the completion of this film her legs were crushed in an automobile accident and she needed the help of a cane to walk for the rest of her life. Her film career was crushed with that car accident, as well.

3507-3.jpg

I'll remember Doris, in particular, for the charming scene in which Cooper asks her for a lock of her hair.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm kinda miffed(as too, my old VHS copy is worse for wear) that TCM slotted THE GRADUATE, a Hoffman flick they've often showed, BEFORE "Marathon Man", a Hoffman film I like better than "Graduate"( though I do like 'em both)  And my having to get up early this morning for an appointment  made it not possible for me to stay and watch.  And no, I have no DVR, and also had  no decent blank tape cassettes handy.  :angry:

Sepiatone

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're a fan or at least had ANY interest in her I guess it's reason to cheer.  But I sit through THE MALTESE FALCON in spite of Astor,  whom I never thought was the "knock-out" Spade's secretary described her as in the beginning of the movie. :unsure: 

Sepiatone

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/25/2019 at 5:31 AM, Bogie56 said:

Monday, August 26/27

Mary Astor day

getImage?id=369645062749&idx=10&thumbTyp

2 a.m.  Return to Peyton Place (1961).  Directed by Jose Ferrer.  Haven’t seen this one.

 

She's the best thing in it!

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/20/2019 at 5:00 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

In looking up MISS MCGUIRE on IMDb, I see quite a few titles I’ve never seen- would love to see MISTER 880. 

In the films of hers that I have seen though, “...BROOKLYN”, “FRIENDLY PERSUASION “, “a summer place”,” gentlemen’s  agreement”, even “the enchanted cottage” in which yes she is good, and most especially “the spiral staircase”- I feel as if she is holding something back.

Like, there’s a possibility it was misdirection in some cases, but still I feel as if she’s too subdued. God help me for this, but if I had ever been one of her directors I probably would’ve grabbed her Bette Davis on Miriam Hopkins “old acquaintance” style and shaken her repeatedly.

This is neither here nor there, but she reminds me very much of the actress who plays BESSIE the devoted maid in “Laura.”

I think Dorothy Mcguire would probably have been terrific if she had ever gotten kind of a “Bea Arthur, tough old broad who hates life” TV role in her later years.

The way Lorna expressed his feelings the other day about Dorothy McGuire in the above quote, is pretty much how I've always felt about Mary Astor.

(...yep, I often get the feeling Mary could also benefit from a good shaking...God help me...too)

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Recommendation for Walter Brennan Day: Nobody Lives Forever, a solid film noir capably directed by Jean Negulesco. Brennan's performance as a world-weary con man is perhaps his best. John Garfield and Geraldine Fitzgerald have unexpectedly nice romantic chemistry. Faye Emerson as Garfield's double-dealing ex-girlfriend is another plus.

I must admit that if I had to watch three of Brennan's lovable old codger performances back to back, I probably couldn't ever watch him again. Not that he doesn't play those roles well. I wish that Hangmen Also Die had been included, where Brennan quite believably plays a Czech professor of philosophy.

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, kingrat said:

I must admit that if I had to watch three of Brennan's lovable old codger performances back to back, I probably couldn't ever watch him again. Not that he doesn't play those roles well.

I agree.  The lovable codger bit gets old fast.  I also like him in roles where he gets a chance to stretch at bit like "Nobody Lives Forever."

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...