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Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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14 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

 Love Bobby's "Blue on Blue" written by Hal David and Burt Bacharach. But in General stuff like "roses are red" are teenage fluff, which sold millions of copies. LOL

But Bobby is no Frank Sinatra, Andy Williams, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis jr., Steve Lawrence, Eddie Fisher, Jack Jones, Vic Damone, Tony Bennett and my personal favorite Nat King Cole, plus I don't want to leave out Mel Torme, and the Heavenly Johnny Mathis-- just to name a few of the best.

However, the Polish Prince has his fans, apparently. 

I've had IT'S NOT FOR ME TO SAY stuck in my head all morning.

Hopefully some of you do too now.

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why do I get the feeling that- had this snap made it to the cover of VOGUE- it would've been the best selling issue of ALL TIME?

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15 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

 

So while it sounds odd to say that more exposure and ease of access would lead to less appreciation and knowledge, I believe that was the case.

 

I couldn't agree more.  But I would too have to insist there are exceptions.  But not enough to tilt the balance noticeably.  Funny too, it came a bit to light last night.....

I was watching JEOPARDY and in the category "Classical Music"  the clue was, "Tchaikosvsky  composed this piece in celebration of Russia's defeat of Napoleon at Moscow"  and while the girl was moving her lips trying to come up with the answer, I was shouting at my TV, "1812!  1812!" but the young lady never gave a response.  Hell, even my KIDS knew that, and learned it while watching MR. ROGERS' NEIGHBORHOOD!  B)

Sepiatone

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Back to O&H;

I can't find too much fault in any TV show( and I don't know if Ozzie had anything to do with it or not) that would have JAMES BURTON playing guitar up front in the band backing Ricky's singing spot at the end of the show.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

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why do I get the feeling that- had this snap made it to the cover of VOGUE- it would've been the best selling issue of ALL TIME?

ROFL.

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1 hour ago, Sepiatone said:

I couldn't agree more.  But I would too have to insist there are exceptions.  But not enough to tilt the balance noticeably.  Funny too, it came a bit to light last night.....

I was watching JEOPARDY and in the category "Classical Music"  the clue was, "Tchaikosvsky  composed this piece in celebration of Russia's defeat of Napoleon at Moscow"  and while the girl was moving her lips trying to come up with the answer, I was shouting at my TV, "1812!  1812!" but the young lady never gave a response.  Hell, even my KIDS knew that, and learned it while watching MR. ROGERS' NEIGHBORHOOD!  B)

Sepiatone

Very very smart people can be very very very ignorant of classical music. Do you remember the GE College Bowl? Members from the student body of high profile colleges competed in a straight question and answer format. Very smart people. I believe there were five a side. Three short excerpts from classical music and not a one of the ten could even hazard a guess. Surprising, because they were real war horses. One was from Tchaikovsky 6th, the 3m march ; another was from Beethoven's "Eroica" ; and I don't remember the third sequence. Of course I dashed them off within a mini-second each. The contestants on that show were often quite brilliant, I don't think they had time to listen to symphonies. Mediocrity may have their little areas of expertise but those guys knew the world.

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The GE College Bowl! I'd forgotten all about that show. When did it go off the air?

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Alan Ludden was the host of the GE College Bowl until 1962 then Robert Earle took over. Alan Ludden left to do Password. It ran on NBC until 1963 then moved to CBS and was on until 1970. A few years back, I posted a question about the GE College Bowl in games and trivia. We always watched that show.

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56 minutes ago, laffite said:

Very very smart people can be very very very ignorant of classical music.

Watching A Song to Remember I was reminded how people were exposed to music prior to recorded music.   The main vehicle for everyone,  was Sheet Music.     I.e. a composers would write a song and sheet music would be printed and sold.   Now the key here is how was the song marketed:    Obvious people had to HEAR the song,  determine they liked it,  and decide to go purchased the sheet music.     But to HEAR the song took specific individual effort from a human being; someone to PLAY the song each and every time other humans wanted to hear it.         

Classical music was the pop music of it's day with written music at the heart of the music.   With today's pop music written music often doesn't exist at all (since the music is so simple),  and when it does it exist mostly only in the studio.      

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42 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Alan Ludden was the host of the GE College Bowl until 1962 then Robert Earle took over. Alan Ludden left to do Password. It ran on NBC until 1963 then moved to CBS and was on until 1970. A few years back, I posted a question about the GE College Bowl in games and trivia. We always watched that show.

I'd forgotten all about that show. I used to watch it too.

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8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I've had IT'S NOT FOR ME TO SAY stuck in my head all morning.

Hopefully some of you do too now.

That is just my favorite one for Johnny Mathis-- I think I love it more than "Misty". The things that he can do with his voice oh, I don't think can be taught. It's just something you're born with.

Last year I watched " A Certain Smile " just because I have loved that song so much for years. And much to my surprise, Johnny appears in that movie singing that song!

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4 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Watching A Song to Remember I was reminded how people were exposed to music prior to recorded music.   The main vehicle for everyone,  was Sheet Music.     I.e. a composers would write a song and sheet music would be printed and sold.   Now the key here is how was the song marketed:    Obvious people had to HEAR the song,  determine they liked it,  and decide to go purchased the sheet music.     But to HEAR the song took specific individual effort from a human being; someone to PLAY the song each and every time other humans wanted to hear it.         

Classical music was the pop music of it's day with written music at the heart of the music.   With today's pop music written music often doesn't exist at all (since the music is so simple),  and when it does it exist mostly only in the studio.      

 Starting in the fifties throughout the 70s, I played the piano and bought sheet music all the time for popular songs. It was very common and it wasn't hard to find in the music store. Many sold them along with the records.

All through the sixties I had sheet music of Mancini, Hal David and Burt Bacharach,The Beatles, Beach Boys and folios as well.

And ironically I found that the rock music was more difficult for me personally to play than the Academy Award winning songs. LOL

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13 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

 Starting in the fifties throughout the 70s, I played the piano and bought sheet music all the time for popular songs. It was very common and it wasn't hard to find in the music store. Many sold them along with the records.

All through the sixties I had sheet music of Mancini, Hal David and Burt Bacharach,The Beatles, Beach Boys and folios as well.

And ironically I found that the rock music was more difficult for me personally to play than the Academy Award winning songs. LOL

I should have been clearer in that last paragraph; as you note sheet music was still produced and available for pop music once there was recordings of music,   but I assume a lot smaller percentage of the general public sought out sheet music once there was recorded music.   I.e. there was NO need to for 99% of the public.   They didn't have to have a human PLAY the music to hear a it,,, all they had to do was play a recording.

PS:  the Garland \ Johnson film In the Good Old Summertime is a good example of how the public was exposed to music before it was recorded.     

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1 minute ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I should have been clearer in that last paragraph; as you note sheet music was still produced and available for pop music once there was recordings of music,   but I assume a lot smaller percentage of the general public sought out sheet music once there was recorded music.   I.e. there was NO need to for 99% of the public.   They didn't have to have a human PLAY the music to hear a it,,, all they had to do was play a recording.

PS:  the Garland \ Johnson film In the Good Old Summertime is a good example of how the public was exposed to music before it was recorded.     

When my mother was a child they had a player piano. This may have been before a lot of people had gramophones.

That's how a lot of people heard music. And George Gershwin famously started his career as a song plugger and playing piano rolls for money.

His piano rolls are still used as concert settings for people to get an opportunity to see and here how he played the piano.

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1 hour ago, Princess of Tap said:

When my mother was a child they had a player piano. This may have been before a lot of people had gramophones.

That's how a lot of people heard music. And George Gershwin famously started his career as a song plugger and playing piano rolls for money.

His piano rolls are still used as concert settings for people to get an opportunity to see and here how he played the piano.

Yes,  the player piano was a way for people to hear music, without a human playing it, before there was recorded music,  but only for around 40 years before recorded music was available.     So yea,  those 40 or so years was a transitional period as it relates to how folks heard music from non-hands-on-human sources.      

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We had a player piano in my house for awhile when I was a kid. We even had a roll of Rhapsody in Blue. That was one huge roll!

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Friday, October 25

a-face-in-the-crowd-1957-new-on-blu-ray-

5:45 p.m.  A Face In the Crowd (1957).  Good film but who on earth would fall for a loud mouth con man like this?

 

James+Iglehart,+Marcia+McBroom,+John+LaZ

“The last time I saw you, you won the heavyweight championship of the world!”

2:15 a.m.  Beyond the Valley of the Dolls (1970).  An acid trip without having to take any acid.

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this is weird, but honest to God- I really think this has become my favorite JOHNNY MATHIS- his voice is still 100% and, well, it's just special-

 

 

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(apologies to BOGIE, will try to re-route the train)

tonight on tcm 10/24-

TCM PRIMETIME - WHAT'S ON TONIGHT: THE UNDEAD
 
8:00 PMhorror
 
9:30 PMhorror
Gorgon, The (1964)
 
11:15 PMhorror
 
I'm really disappointed in the October schedule, but I'll probably watch HORROR OF DRACULA for the 37th time, I don't think I've seen THE GORGON, and I do recommend PLAGUE OF THE ZOMBIES for any who have not seen it, as I recall it's one of the best "stand alone" Hammer Horrors.
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20 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Watching A Song to Remember I was reminded how people were exposed to music prior to recorded music.   The main vehicle for everyone,  was Sheet Music.     I.e. a composers would write a song and sheet music would be printed and sold.   Now the key here is how was the song marketed:    Obvious people had to HEAR the song,  determine they liked it,  and decide to go purchased the sheet music.     But to HEAR the song took specific individual effort from a human being; someone to PLAY the song each and every time other humans wanted to hear it.         

Classical music was the pop music of it's day with written music at the heart of the music.   With today's pop music written music often doesn't exist at all (since the music is so simple),  and when it does it exist mostly only in the studio.      

I think near the end of it's marketing, sheet music was becoming a bit too inaccurate.  I saw BILLY JOEL on Bravo's INSIDE THE ACTORS STUDIO (why him on that show, I don't know) complain about discovering much of the sheet music available for some of his songs containing note and chord mistakes.  Like a C noted when the actual chord was Cmaj7 or Cdim or whatever.  And his was probably not the only music given that treatment. 

Sepiatone

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7 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I think near the end of it's marketing, sheet music was becoming a bit too inaccurate.  I saw BILLY JOEL on Bravo's INSIDE THE ACTORS STUDIO (why him on that show, I don't know) complain about discovering much of the sheet music available for some of his songs containing note and chord mistakes.  Like a C noted when the actual chord was Cmaj7 or Cdim or whatever.  And his was probably not the only music given that treatment. 

Sepiatone

What Joel was complaining about are private copies of "sheet music" that are legal only if they are the interpretation of the creator;  i.e.  they can NOT by law match that of the original,  copy written,  sheet music.

This is what one finds for free on the Internet;  someone takes the original sheet music (or for simple pop songs just gets the chord changes from a recording),  changes ONE chord,  and puts  the disclaimer on it (also required by law),  that it is their own 'work' (and thus can be provided to the **** as an expression of their 1st amendment rights).

     

  

 

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I don't recall Joel mentioning the music was found on the internet.  But even long before that, I've found books of music that contained several song's lyrics mondegreens instead of what was originally composed and recorded.  And too then......

I have the huge hard-cover edition of BOB DYLAN LYRICS which does have some( a few here and there) lyrics that did wind up changed by the time the songs were recorded.  But it was maybe just a word or two here and there.  Nothing serious. 

And I do recall Joel saying he's found sheet music of his songs in music stores and that did contain such misinformation. 

Sepiatone

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My Mother was a professional singer and piano player and she used to have "Fake Books", spiral-bound books of sheet music containing popular songs.

Did you notice that the first few notes of Johnny Mathis' standards; "Chances Are" and "It's Not For Me To Say" are very similar?  Saw him in NYC at the Uris Theater in 1973.

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I saw a working player piano in an antique store once.  It was fascinating to watch.

Another time, in an old home/museum, they had a really old phonograph that played these metal records that had holes instead of grooves.  We listened to this John Phillip Sousa march record.  That was also very interesting--the best thing in that museum. 

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8 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Friday, October 25

a-face-in-the-crowd-1957-new-on-blu-ray-

5:45 p.m.  A Face In the Crowd (1957).  Good film but who on earth would fall for a loud mouth con man like this?

 

James+Iglehart,+Marcia+McBroom,+John+LaZ

“The last time I saw you, you won the heavyweight championship of the world!”

2:15 a.m.  Beyond the Valley of the Dolls (1970).  An acid trip without having to take any acid.

I love A Face in the Crowd.  Andy Griffith is kind of charming, until he really starts going off the rails. But I agree his loudmouth would be a turn off.  This film is very prescient of the nature of today's media--especially the level of narcissism present in social media.  This film would make a great pairing with Network

I love Valley of the Dolls.  I know the second film is not a sequel to the first, but based solely on the picture, it looks like something I would watch. 

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