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Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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So, when and why did this thread turn into a BETTE DAVIS appreciation thread?  :huh:

Not knocking Bette mind you, but there's other business to be done in this thread.  ;)

Sepiatone

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I adore every minute of this film, even if the kid playing Reynard cannot ACT TO SAVE HIS LIFE.

It is SO OLD-FASHIONED, yet unlike JEZEBEL, the HISTORICAL CONTEXT in which it is set is not a strike against it.

I even love BETTE'S PEE WEE HERMAN BOWTIE.

AND THE FACT THAT DOC MEAD IS THE CHATEAU CARETAKER.

And EVERY SECOND of BARBARA O'NEILL's performance.

Great mini review. A new form. Surgical strikes of enthusiasm. I'm like Bethluvfilms, I don't think I've heard of this one. But I want to see it. Bette looks so sweet. Great clips you posted. "Do you want to hear my life story?" "No." lol .

1 hour ago, scsu1975 said:

Besides the correct mathematics (which is a rarity in films), more importantly, the drawings on the board (which you can't see in that still) are also consistent with the way trigonometry was taught in the 18th and 19th centuries; thus, the lesson is consistent with the time period in the film. Kudos to whoever wrote the mathematics on the blackboard.

Great catch! As our resident mathematician, you are probably the only one here that would notice that. It's gratifying to realize that they can get something so esoteric as that correctly. To represent it as it was taught back then, wow! I checked trivia on IMDB and it is not mentioned. Rich, why don't you go on there and learn everyone about that. BTW, I noticed that the earthquake sequence took a long to film and cost $200,000. Can you imagine that? That much money back then? Wow!

14 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

So, when and why did this thread turn into a BETTE DAVIS appreciation thread?  :huh:

Not knocking Bette mind you, but there's other business to be done in this thread.  ;)

Sepiatone 

Sorry, Sep. Bette is one our most beloved prima donnas. She's used to first billing and must be indulged. BTW, in The Sisters, they tried to give Errol first billing but Bette would not have it. 

..

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

it's one of her (and ERROL FLYNN's) lesser-mentioned films, but it deserves to be better known...

Errol is great in The Sisters as well.  It's one of the few films of his where he isn't a hero, he's actually taken down a peg.  He actually fails at something and is able to be vulnerable. I thought that Errol turned in one of his best performances in this film.

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57 minutes ago, laffite said:

Bette is one our most beloved prima donnas. She's used to first billing and must be indulged. BTW, in The Sisters, they tried to give Errol first billing but Bette would not have it.

I think Bette, when fighting for top billing, used the angle that "Errol Flynn in The Sisters" didn't sound quite right. Lol.

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6 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I think Bette, when fighting for top billing, used the angle that "Errol Flynn in The Sisters" didn't sound quite right. Lol.

:lol:

Yeah, and that reminds of Marilyn. In Gentlemen Prefer Blondes she was carping either about top billing or maybe about not being paid enough and her argument was, "Well, I'm the blonde."

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1 hour ago, laffite said:

Sorry, Sep. Bette is one our most beloved prima donnas. She's used to first billing and must be indulged. BTW, in The Sisters, they tried to give Errol first billing but Bette would not have it. 

..

Davis didn't get her way this time, not only in the screen credits but all advertising for the film, as well. In the following year's Elizabeth and Essex, though, vengeance would be her's and she would receive top billing. She'd also slap Errol across the face for real but that's another story (which Flynn would discuss at length years later in his autobiography).

MV5BNjljMmFlYTctYzBlNy00NzYyLWIyODQtNDk2

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2 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

So, when and why did this thread turn into a BETTE DAVIS appreciation thread?  :huh:

Not knocking Bette mind you, but there's other business to be done in this thread.  ;)

Sepiatone

Uh,  Bette is star of the month and her films are being shown on Tuesday,  which is today,  and this thread is about films TCMs showed or will show Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.     (so if Davis is mentioned a lot tomorrow that would be logical at this thread as well since her films would have been shown yesterday).

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15 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Davis didn't get her way this time, not only in the screen credits but all advertising for the film, as well. In the following year's Elizabeth and Essex, though, vengeance would be her's and she would receive top billing. She'd also slap Errol across the face for real but that's another story (which Flynn would discuss at length years later in his autobiography).

MV5BNjljMmFlYTctYzBlNy00NzYyLWIyODQtNDk2

Thank, I stand corrected. I may have misconstrued what I saw on IMDB, which was:

"Originally the film credits were to read "Errol Flynn in The Sisters", but Bette Davis demanded equal billing alongside Errol Flynn. She also pointed out that the original credits had an unwelcome sexual connotation."

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49 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

THE SISTERS looks like a good one, do you know if it's available on DVD or Blu-Ray?

I know it's on DVD because I have it.  I bought mine on WB Shop under their Warner Archives. It's a MOD (Manufactured on Demand) film. 

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31 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Davis didn't get her way this time, not only in the screen credits but all advertising for the film, as well. In the following year's Elizabeth and Essex, though, vengeance would be her's and she would receive top billing. She'd also slap Errol across the face for real but that's another story (which Flynn would discuss at length years later in his autobiography).

MV5BNjljMmFlYTctYzBlNy00NzYyLWIyODQtNDk2

I like how the WB art department didn't even try to use images of their stars from the film.  On this poster, and the poster that was used as the DVD cover on WB Archives, Flynn has his mustache.  He doesn't have a mustache in the film, however. 

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12 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Uh,  Bette is star of the month and her films are being shown on Tuesday,  which is today,  and this thread is about films TCMs showed or will show Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow.     (so if Davis is mentioned a lot tomorrow that would be logical at this thread as well since her films would have been shown yesterday).

So in November, we can talk about Bette Davis on Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday.

(I've yet to see a thread that stayed on track all the time)

My favorite Bette Davis movie is The Whales of August. Shows on the final Tuesday of the month, actually Wednesday AM.

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3 hours ago, scsu1975 said:

Besides the correct mathematics (which is a rarity in films), more importantly, the drawings on the board (which you can't see in that still) are also consistent with the way trigonometry was taught in the 18th and 19th centuries; thus, the lesson is consistent with the time period in the film. Kudos to whoever wrote the mathematics on the blackboard.

Thanks for the interesting info.  I was afraid at first that someone would say "That is not Trigonometry!" but you can see it on the far right hand side.

However, this did lead me to wonder...but in a historical context, would girls of this period have been taught advanced mathematics?  

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21 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

Thanks for the interesting info.  I was afraid at first that someone would say "That is not Trigonometry!" but you can see it on the far right hand side.

However, this did lead me to wonder...but in a historical context, would girls of this period have been taught advanced mathematics?  

Hey,  baking requires the use of advanced mathematics.     (only in a historical context of course!).

 

 

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35 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

Thanks for the interesting info.  I was afraid at first that someone would say "That is not Trigonometry!" but you can see it on the far right hand side.

However, this did lead me to wonder...but in a historical context, would girls of this period have been taught advanced mathematics?  

That is a fair question, but there are actually two points to ponder:

1. What kind of mathematics were taught to girls at a private school?

2. Is trigonometry "advanced mathematics?"

Point 2 is easier to answer: No. Trigonometry, back then, and even today, should not be considered advanced mathematics. During the relevant time period of this film, geometry would have been taught, and most standard geometry texts of the time were based on Euclid's Elements, with a little trig thrown in at the end. (I actually have a few in my collection, the oldest being from 1795.) So trig could have been covered in a geometry course. On the other hand, there was undoubtedly sexism that existed, which may have precluded some subjects from being taught to females. Still, a private school may have been progressive. So there is no easy answer to that point. But thanks for asking, and now that I've bored everyone to death, go on talking about Bette.

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

I like how the WB art department didn't even try to use images of their stars from the film.  On this poster, and the poster that was used as the DVD cover on WB Archives, Flynn has his mustache.  He doesn't have a mustache in the film, however. 

Well I'm surprised the WB art department didn't work in the S.F. earthquake into either poster.

 

TheSistersPoster.jpg

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7 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Well I'm surprised the WB art department didn't work in the S.F. earthquake into either poster.

 

TheSistersPoster.jpg

I know! Or a picture of the other sisters! 

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2 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Well I'm surprised the WB art department didn't work in the S.F. earthquake into either poster.

 

TheSistersPoster.jpg

One of the reasons that I liked THE SISTERS So much when I first saw it was because I had no idea the earthquake scene was coming. It’s incredibly effective and surprising, And it’s especially great because it comes at the end of a Long line of scenes of hardships that BETTE’s character endures that day.

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38 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

One of the reasons that I liked THE SISTERS So much when I first saw it was because I had no idea the earthquake scene was coming. It’s incredibly effective and surprising, And it’s especially great because it comes at the end of a Long line of scenes of hardships that BETTE’s character endures that day.

I love Lee Patrick as Bette's nosy neighbor in this film.  She's always so good at playing the brassy women.  I also loved the boxing scene with Errol enjoying the fight wholeheartedly and Bette looking repulsed by the action. 

And Errol in this film... ::Sigh:: If I could only look so good in a "disheveled" state.

Image result for errol flynn the sisters

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Errol Flynn was, unfortunately,  a lot closer to the character he played in The Sisters than he was to any of his swashbuckling roles.

In the film his character is a self destructive charmer who suffers from wanderlust, is an unreliable husband, wants to be a good writer and drinks, all of which could be a description of the actor himself.

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

One of the reasons that I liked THE SISTERS So much when I first saw it was because I had no idea the earthquake scene was coming. It’s incredibly effective and surprising, And it’s especially great because it comes at the end of a Long line of scenes of hardships that BETTE’s character endures that day.

I had a similar experience the first time I viewed The Sisters.    A drama,  mostly talk (but fine acting so I was enjoying the film),  Bette has some hardships,,, and then,,,,  boom,,,,  her House falls down all around her!

That is why I'm surprised about the poster since that was the most dynamic\action scene in the film.

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Thursday, November 14

Murder-My-Sweet_001-crop.jpeg?itok=uk2WX

6:15 p.m.  Murder, My Sweet (1944).  Dick Powell’s re-invents himself as hard-nosed Philip Marlowe and does a pretty good job of it too.  But are those lifts by any chance?

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16 hours ago, laffite said:

Thank, I stand corrected. I may have misconstrued what I saw on IMDB, which was:

"Originally the film credits were to read "Errol Flynn in The Sisters", but Bette Davis demanded equal billing alongside Errol Flynn. She also pointed out that the original credits had an unwelcome sexual connotation

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