Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

Recommended Posts

2 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I agree completely with this. I would love to see another interview with Mitzi Gaynor and more of her 60s/70s TV specials.

I really want to see Rhonda Fleming's Slightly Scarlet

Speaking of Slightly Scarlet, both Rhonda and Arlene Dahl are still alive, in their '90s. TCM should be trying to secure interviews with the ladies, if possible.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Speaking of Slightly Scarlet, both Rhonda and Arlene Dahl are still alive, in their '90s. TCM should be trying to secure interviews with the ladies, if possible.

Arlene Dahl is someone who I've heard of, but she always seems to be in very small parts.  Her character doesn't really seem to impact the action.  Is there a film where Dahl has a larger role than just a 5 line side character?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Arlene Dahl is someone who I've heard of, but she always seems to be in very small parts.  Her character doesn't really seem to impact the action.  Is there a film where Dahl has a larger role than just a 5 line side character?

She has equal screen time with Rhonda Fleming in Slightly Scarlet and pretty much steals the film. She was also a glamourous leading lady in a lot of '50s films, even if their titles may not ring out as classics today. Dahl was a solid second tier leading lady, very much like Rhonda Fleming.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, TomJH said:

She has equal time with Rhonda Fleming in Slightly Scarlet and pretty much steals the film. She was also a glamourous leading lady in a lot of '50s films, even if their titles may not ring out as classics today. Dahl was a solid second tier leading lady, very much like Rhonda Fleming.

I thought Rhonda Fleming was great in Cry Danger with Dick Powell. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I thought Rhonda Fleming was great in Cry Danger with Dick Powell. 

It was actually the other cast members that really impressed me in that film, particularly Richard Erdman who had some of the best dialogue in the film. Fleming sure looked good, though (Yeh, I know, that's a real surprise)..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, TomJH said:

There are so few stars of the Golden Age still with us. I think TCM should place an emphasis upon them when it comes to SOTM considerations, possibly even with their input. Ann Blyth certainly had a noteworthy career. There is also, of course, Kirk Douglas, who will turn 103 next month.

Marsha Hunt, Olivia DeHavilland, and Norman Lloyd are still present and accounted for too (all past the century mark, age-wise).  The first film I remember seeing Ann Blyth in was "The Helen Morgan Story", which I liked.

Also, I watched "Station West" when it was on last Thursday (via YouTubeTV).  I thought I had noticed something quirky on previous viewings of this film, so I made it a point to pay closer attention to the beginning of the movie.  What I noticed was that Burl Ives, who sang throughout the picture and was the hotelier of Dick Powell's lodgings, got no screen credit for his role in "Station West".  Anyone else notice this?  IMDB says Ives was loaned out from 20th Century Fox to RKO to make this picture.  So, if anyone has some inside dope on why a relatively prominent character in this film didn't make the credits, I think it would make for an interesting story/discussion, perhaps?

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Arlene Dahl is someone who I've heard of, but she always seems to be in very small parts.  Her character doesn't really seem to impact the action.  Is there a film where Dahl has a larger role than just a 5 line side character?

She played Van Johnson's wife in 1949's "Scene of the Crime", a film noir that's been featured on TCM's Noir Alley.  She's got some good scenes with him and one memorable scene in the car when she and her husband detective are surprised by Norman Lloyd, who's been hiding in the back seat!

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Looking forward to it. Yes Errol was starting to go downhill, but he was still agile enough at this time to pull off another great swashbuckling performance.

if I remenber well, the lady in the carriage smiling at him in the very last scene was his then wife Nora Eddington.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, nakano said:

if I remenber well, the lady in the carriage smiling at him in the very last scene was his then wife Nora Eddington.

nora-eddington-flynn-1-300x230.jpg

The Flynns would divorce soon after this scene was shot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't even know THE LITTLE FOXES had a prequel. Would be interesting to see how Ann Blyth did in the role of Regina, though Bette Davis is a tough act to follow.

Not to say that Blyth wouldn't be up to the challenge, she was excellent as the despicable Vera Pierce in MILDRED PIERCE, so if anyone could fill Davis' very big shoes, she probably could.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Agreed! Another Part of the Forest was a great film.  I watched it as part of my Edmond O'Brien kick a few months ago.  I thought O'Brien was excellent in his rather villainous role.  Dan Duryea's character, while not great, was actually not the worst person in the movie.  O'Brien and Blyth were my favorite characters.  I hope that TCM airs this again soon. 

Did you watch Orson Welles' The Other Side of the Wind (2018)?  O'Brien is quite good in that one too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wednesday, November 20/21

ernest-borgnine-the-wild-bunch-1969-BNPW

3 a.m.  The Wild Bunch (1969).  Top Notch in every way.  I love the bit where Borgnine grabs the woman as a shield in the gunfight.  A very shocking moment given his usual cuddly persona.

the-wild-bunch-lg.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I didn't even know THE LITTLE FOXES had a prequel. Would be interesting to see how Ann Blyth did in the role of Regina, though Bette Davis is a tough act to follow.

Not to say that Blyth wouldn't be up to the challenge, she was excellent as the despicable Vera Pierce in MILDRED PIERCE, so if anyone could fill Davis' very big shoes, she probably could.

She is surprisingly good- not that Blyth was a bad actress, mind you,  Quite the opposite in fact- But it would be a daunting task to step into a role that Bette had played to the hilt so completely just a few years earlier. She does a really good job, and actually physically resembles Davis right down to the mannerisms which are not exaggerated.

The only problem I had with ANOTHER PART OF THE FORESTWas that it was too genuinely an ensemble film, there really is no lead role in it, and as such It kind of lacks focus.

I mean, who are you supposed to root for when all the characters are terrible and no one seems to be the hero?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I mean, who are you supposed to root for when all the characters are terrible and no one seems to be the hero?

Is it necessary to always have someone to root for? Can a story survive without that? I'm actually pondering that, I'm not really sure. It might be interesting to try and think of one.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, laffite said:

Is it necessary to always have someone to root for? Can a story survive without that? I'm actually pondering that, I'm not really sure. It might be interesting to try and think of one.

 

I think a film can have no one you really root for, but a decidedly central character Dash someone that the film is all about. What perplexed me about ANOTHER PAET OF THE FIREST Is that, not only are there no characters to really root for, there’s not even a central character to not route four and hope to see them go down in flames in the last act. I’m OK with films about Unlikable people, but I think there should just be at least a central figure of someone whose story is central.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I posted that using my phone, and it’s about impossible to correct the mistakes, but I think you guys will get the gyst of what I was getting at

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, laffite said:

Is it necessary to always have someone to root for? Can a story survive without that? I'm actually pondering that, I'm not really sure. It might be interesting to try and think of one.

 

A story can be about evil (or, at least, nasty) characters and be intriguing for precisely that reason. There doesn't have to be a contrasting "good person," though that would be the conventional thing to do. Besides in the film some of the characters evolve (not for the better, admittedly, which is a part of the interest), not appearing to be bad right from the beginning of Another Part of the Forest. There's a nasty feeling to it all, of course, but, as a study of moral corruption, dealing with, to put it mildly, a dysfunctional family, the film is well crafted and quite mesmerizing.

Now that I think about it, there is one good person in the film: the mother (played by Florence Eldridge). She's weak and you sympathize with her, rather than identify with her. But her character gains strength and . . . I'll stop there, I don't want to give any of the story away.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can think of two movies that have two of the most vile, evil characters to disgrace the silver screen, yet they still keep you watching in spite of their evil deeds. (SPOILERS alert):

Alex DeLarge (Malcolm McDowell) of A CLOCKWORK ORANGE....you can't say he really doesn't deserve all of his sufferings in the second half of the film after all the pain and suffering he causes as well as the havoc and destruction he wreaks during the first half, and yet, he still manages to make you feel some sympathy, no matter how undeserving of it, when he gets a taste of his own medicine. A testament to McDowell's strong performance.

Patrick Bateman (Christian Bale) of AMERICAN PSYCHO you can't really root for or have any kind of empathy at all, for he has absolutely no empathy or feeling for anyone, he's a serial killer or at least a serial killer-in-the-making (it's debatable whether he really does kill in the movie, or the murders are simply in his imagination, I personally believe he did do the killings for real, but I digress). Still it's a testament to Bale's acting ability he makes me want to watch him knowing what a soulless monster Bateman is.

So yes, I say it is possible to have a film, where the lead character inspires little to no sympathy at all from the viewer, but still make it a watchable film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, TomJH said:

Speaking of Slightly Scarlet, both Rhonda and Arlene Dahl are still alive, in their '90s. TCM should be trying to secure interviews with the ladies, if possible.

TCM doesn't seem interested in second rung stars. I don't remember even one being interviewed over the years....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/16/2019 at 12:36 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

In the annals of HOLLYWOOD "ALMOST WASES" the name MAYO METHOT is one of my ABSOLUTE FAVORITES.

Who could name their kid MAYO? Hold the MAYO! LOL. I wonder if that was her real name?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Hibi said:

TCM doesn't seem interested in second rung stars. I don't remember even one being interviewed over the years....

I think you're right about the interview thing, but I think both Fleming and Dahl have been used in promo clips either discussing a particular movie they were in or an actor or actress they may have worked with if said film or celebrity is on the upcoming TCM schedule.  Sort of like the clip they use sometimes of Audrey Totter discussing "The Lady In The Lake" and how she and Robert Montgomery hated re-shooting the ending of the film, even though test audiences preferred it that way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/17/2019 at 12:02 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I find OLIVER REED to be incredibly attractive, like absolute MOVIE STAR material- and it stuns me that HIS UNCLE, SIR CAROL, did not initially want to cast him in OLIVER! because- to Hell with Nepotism- once you see THAT MUG on the screen, you see a STAR being born.

He is also AMAZING in THE DEVILS (1971).

I didn't know he was related to Carol Reed! Too bad he went to pot quickly. Didn't age well.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Hibi said:

I didn't know he was related to Carol Reed! Too bad he went to pot quickly. Didn't age well.

I think the GALLONS OF BOOZE probably played a role in that.

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I would love a SOTM tribute to Ann Blyth.  She's my favorite character from Mildred Pierce.  She's also one of the actors whose name in the credits will attract me to the film.  I would love to hear her recollections about slapping Joan Crawford. While I know she left her career for her family, I wish she'd continued her career past the late 50s. I also loved Ann Blyth in Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid with William Powell. 

ANN BLYTH SOTM in 2020!

I wouldnt count on it. A lot of her films were made at Universal...

  • Sad 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, midwestan said:

I think you're right about the interview thing, but I think both Fleming and Dahl have been used in promo clips either discussing a particular movie they were in or an actor or actress they may have worked with if said film or celebrity is on the upcoming TCM schedule.  Sort of like the clip they use sometimes of Audrey Totter discussing "The Lady In The Lake" and how she and Robert Montgomery hated re-shooting the ending of the film, even though test audiences preferred it that way.

Yes, but those weren't done by TCM. They just show them. Blyth was interviewed (briefly) during one of the TCM Festivals a few years ago.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


© 2019 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
×
×
  • Create New...