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Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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30 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I think the GALLONS OF BOOZE probably played a role in that.

LOL. Yes.

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6 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Did you watch Orson Welles' The Other Side of the Wind (2018)?  O'Brien is quite good in that one too.

I haven't seen this one.  When was the film originally made? 

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

She is surprisingly good- not that Blyth was a bad actress, mind you,  Quite the opposite in fact- But it would be a daunting task to step into a role that Bette had played to the hilt so completely just a few years earlier. She does a really good job, and actually physically resembles Davis right down to the mannerisms which are not exaggerated.

The only problem I had with ANOTHER PART OF THE FORESTWas that it was too genuinely an ensemble film, there really is no lead role in it, and as such It kind of lacks focus.

I mean, who are you supposed to root for when all the characters are terrible and no one seems to be the hero?

Lol. I was kind of rooting for Ann Blyth and Edmond O'Brien, but I know we weren't supposed to.

I suppose the only person to really root for was the mom.  She seemed to be the only character who wasn't really terrible.  She was just this poor woman whom her family treated like a doormat.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I think the GALLONS OF BOOZE probably played a role in that.

I read an article about Oliver Reed's alcohol consumption over the course of an evening. I felt like I was going to be sick just reading about it.

Apparently one night, Reed and Steve McQueen went out drinking together and the night culminated with Reed vomiting all over McQueen.  Reed and McQueen were no longer drinking buddies after that.

Also, apparently Oliver Reed used to be friends with Richard Burton, another legendary drinker.  A few years before he died, Burton had surgery and the doctors found crystallized alcohol wrapped around his spine. Yikes! Anyway, Reed and Burton used to really tear up the town, until Burton started dating Elizabeth Taylor.  Elizabeth Taylor actually thought that Reed was a bad influence on Burton and encouraged her beau to distance himself from Reed. 

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20 hours ago, TomJH said:

Speaking of Slightly Scarlet, both Rhonda and Arlene Dahl are still alive, in their '90s. TCM should be trying to secure interviews with the ladies, if possible.

I just found Slightly Scarlet at the library! I put a hold on it.  I'm excited! 

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2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I haven't seen this one.  When was the film originally made? 

Welles shot it in the early 70's but it was never finished until this year.  There is a documentary about the Herculian effort to finish it called They'll Love Me When I'm Dead.  Both it and the Welles feature were financed by Netflix.

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2 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Welles shot it in the early 70's but it was never finished until this year.  There is a documentary about the Herculian effort to finish it called They'll Love Me When I'm Dead.  Both it and the Welles feature were financed by Netflix.

This must be one of the last films Edmond O'Brien made.  I know he had to stop making films at some point in the 70s because Alzheimer's was starting to affect his ability to remember his lines.  By the time of his death in the mid-80s, his Alzheimer's was very severe. 

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48 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

This must be one of the last films Edmond O'Brien made.  I know he had to stop making films at some point in the 70s because Alzheimer's was starting to affect his ability to remember his lines.  By the time of his death in the mid-80s, his Alzheimer's was very severe. 

Check out its imdb page.  There are quite a few stars in it who never lived to see the release including John Huston who plays the lead.

Some think it is a mess but I loved it.  The style is intentional.   At one point they are running the film within a film at a drive-in and somebody complains to the projectionist that he is playing the reels out of order.  He responds, "does it matter?"  :lol:

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2 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Welles shot it in the early 70's but it was never finished until this year.  There is a documentary about the Herculian effort to finish it called They'll Love Me When I'm Dead.  Both it and the Welles feature were financed by Netflix.

I have this movie about Don Quixote coming from Netflix. I had thought that this was a project that he never got around to finishing. So what's this then? Comments?

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Thursday, November 21

MV5BNzc3YTY4NjktYTkwMi00YWI4LTk4ZjAtNzQx

1:15 a.m.  John Ford, the Man Who Invented America (2018).  New documentary from France featuring Ford biographer, Joseph McBride.  McBride's Searching For John Ford is one of the best biographies on film directors that I have read.  McBride also happens to have worked on and appeared in Welles' The Other Side of the Wind.

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14 hours ago, laffite said:

I have this movie about Don Quixote coming from Netflix. I had thought that this was a project that he never got around to finishing. So what's this then? Comments?

Check out the imdb page for The Other Side of the Wind (2018) and this thread in General Discussions ...

http://forums.tcm.com/topic/167147-orson-welles-the-other-side-of-the-wind/

 

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Friday, November 22/23

hqdefault.jpg

5:30 a.m.  Summer of ’63 (1963).  For nostalgia lovers.  “Teens on the make spread syphilis among their friends.

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3 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Friday, November 22/23

hqdefault.jpg

5:30 a.m.  Summer of ’63 (1963).  For nostalgia lovers.  “Teens on the make spread syphilis among their friends.

OMG. I thought you were kidding, but that's what the TCM synopsis says! What a summer!

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23 minutes ago, Hibi said:

OMG. I thought you were kidding, but that's what the TCM synopsis says! What a summer!

The Summer that keeps on giving. 

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17 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

The Summer that keeps on giving. 

LOL!

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6 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Friday, November 22/23

hqdefault.jpg

5:30 a.m.  Summer of ’63 (1963).  For nostalgia lovers.  “Teens on the make spread syphilis among their friends.

Oh syphilis. Those were the days.

Will this be the companion piece to my second favorite short "Match Your Mood" ?  Better set it up on the DVR!

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On 11/20/2019 at 4:28 AM, Bogie56 said:

Check out the imdb page for The Other Side of the Wind (2018) and this thread in General Discussions ...

http://forums.tcm.com/topic/167147-orson-welles-the-other-side-of-the-wind/

 

 

******

 

sr3N1ba.jpg

You wrote: Jess Franco's mess of Welles' Don Quixote is the flip side.  Franco perhaps made what he could of the footage available to him at the time.  And of course he had no access to any of the actors.  But I hear even Don Quixote may get another try as more footage from a separate collection has apparently become available  

I'm surprised at your opinion. I loved it. Maybe I'm making allowances because of its tortured history. It was connected (pasted together, whatever) more completely that I expected. What should Franco have done differently? Anyway, Franco aside, the wonderful Wellesian touches seem to be there. The camera is great (reminds me of  Ophuls). Welles own voice overs are damn good. The Wiki page asserts that the windmill scene was done in one of the later "modern" scene settings. Not the one I saw. It was shot out in the plains, great sound (creaking), there's Don seen riding up as seen through the winding arms of the mill (in a sequence other than the above). I recall a Russian 1957 version of DonQ and our hero attacks and get caught in the spokes/lattice of the arms goes round and round. It was very good. Welles may have seen this and prudently decided not to copy it. But the Welles way is good too. I like to retain the 4:3 with old movies but this one looked fabulous at 16:9. I see the Welles version of DonQ  as a treasure.

///

 

 

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52 minutes ago, laffite said:

 

******

 

sr3N1ba.jpg

You wrote: Jess Franco's mess of Welles' Don Quixote is the flip side.  Franco perhaps made what he could of the footage available to him at the time.  And of course he had no access to any of the actors.  But I hear even Don Quixote may get another try as more footage from a separate collection has apparently become available  

I'm surprised at your opinion. I loved it. Maybe I'm making allowances because of its tortured history. It was connected (pasted together, whatever) more completely that I expected. What should Franco have done differently? Anyway, Franco aside, the wonderful Wellesian touches seem to be there. The camera is great (reminds me of  Ophuls). Welles own voice overs are damn good. The Wiki page asserts that the windmill scene was done in one of the later "modern" scene settings. Not the one I saw. It was shot out in the plains, great sound (creaking), there's Don seen riding up as seen through the winding arms of the mill (in a sequence other than the above). I recall a Russian 1957 version of DonQ and our hero attacks and get caught in the spokes/lattice of the arms goes round and round. It was very good. Welles may have seen this and prudently decided not to copy it. But the Welles way is good too. I like to retain the 4:3 with old movies but this one looked fabulous at 16:9. I see the Welles version of DonQ  as a treasure.

///

 

 

The film is really a lot more Franco than it is Welles. Welles may have never seen that Russian version or may have chosen to go a different route eventually.

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3 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

The film is really a lot more Franco than it is Welles. Welles may have never seen that Russian version or may have chosen to go a different route eventually.

That doesn't seem quite fair. Franco edited the finish. Welles was behind the camera. That's where the movie excels.

My comment about the Russian version involved the windmill scene and was a conjecture on my part. Welles was his own man throughout the film, no doubt.

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3 hours ago, laffite said:

That doesn't seem quite fair. Franco edited the finish. Welles was behind the camera. That's where the movie excels.

My comment about the Russian version involved the windmill scene and was a conjecture on my part. Welles was his own man throughout the film, no doubt.

It's a Frankenstein creation of something Welles laid the ground for. Like a torn up painting taped back together.

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2 hours ago, Gershwin fan said:

It's a Frankenstein creation of something Welles laid the ground for. Like a torn up painting taped back together.

Maybe I'm giving it too much credit but it played better than that for me. Hardly Frankenstein IMO. The type of story, the picaresque, usually has a loose narrative flow anyway, one adventure after another ... and that helped. It all broke up at the end but I secretly suspect that might have happened anyway, what with Welles himself becoming a character. The Don was imprisoned by the moderns because he was by representing the old virtues out of date, but with the help of Sancho, escapes because, as Welles tells us with his own explanation of this story, the virtues are eternal. So there was in fact a sort of ending. (Note: if Welles lived another25 years, I wonder if he be able to say that about the old virtues with a straight face).

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13 hours ago, laffite said:

 

******

 

sr3N1ba.jpg

You wrote: Jess Franco's mess of Welles' Don Quixote is the flip side.  Franco perhaps made what he could of the footage available to him at the time.  And of course he had no access to any of the actors.  But I hear even Don Quixote may get another try as more footage from a separate collection has apparently become available  

I'm surprised at your opinion. I loved it. Maybe I'm making allowances because of its tortured history. It was connected (pasted together, whatever) more completely that I expected. What should Franco have done differently? Anyway, Franco aside, the wonderful Wellesian touches seem to be there. The camera is great (reminds me of  Ophuls). Welles own voice overs are damn good. The Wiki page asserts that the windmill scene was done in one of the later "modern" scene settings. Not the one I saw. It was shot out in the plains, great sound (creaking), there's Don seen riding up as seen through the winding arms of the mill (in a sequence other than the above). I recall a Russian 1957 version of DonQ and our hero attacks and get caught in the spokes/lattice of the arms goes round and round. It was very good. Welles may have seen this and prudently decided not to copy it. But the Welles way is good too. I like to retain the 4:3 with old movies but this one looked fabulous at 16:9. I see the Welles version of DonQ  as a treasure.

///

 

 

I was referring to Jess Franco's 1992 version of Welles' Don Quixote.  For one, it seems he may not have had access to all of Welles' footage.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0104121/reference

Here is a page on Welles' version of the unfinished film at ..

https://www.wellesnet.com/don-quixote/

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Sunday, November 24

lat-audrey-roman-holiday-wre0004489629-2

8 p.m.  Roman Holiday (1953).  Always enjoyable and usually much more so than you remember.  The charisma of its two stars is captivating.

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