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HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM


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3 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Sunday, November 24

lat-audrey-roman-holiday-wre0004489629-2

8 p.m.  Roman Holiday (1953).  Always enjoyable and usually much more so than you remember.  The charisma of its two stars is captivating.

Gregory Peck, a class act, insisted that the little known Audrey Hepburn receive billing above the title with him. They would remain lifelong friends.

William Wyler had a good feeling about Hepburn after seeing her screen test and, even though she was a film novice, insisted upon holding off production on the film until after the actress had finished a stage run of Gigi.

In her excitement at winning the Academy Award Hepburn left her Oscar in the ladies room. (They would soon be reunited).

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Kansas City Confidential, Midnight, Sat., 11/23 and 10 AM on Sunday is a very good Film Noir with a great cast and story.  John Payne, Lee Van Cleef,  Coleen Gray, Jack Elam, Preston Foster, Neville Brand, etc.

Then there will be Eddie Muller's intro and outro.

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15 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

I was referring to Jess Franco's 1992 version of Welles' Don Quixote.  For one, it seems he may not have had access to all of Welles' footage.

Yes, I know. That the one I'm talking about too.

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22 minutes ago, laffite said:

Yes, I know. That the one I'm talking about too.

There is quite a lot on the subject on its wikipedia page.  They had this about the 1992 Jess Franco version...

The Irigoyen and Franco work premiered at the 1992 Cannes Film Festival as Don Quixote de Orson Welles, with English- and Spanish-language versions produced. Initial reaction was predominantly negative, and this version was never theatrically released in the U.S. In September 2008, a U.S. DVD edition was released as Orson Welles' Don Quixote by Image Entertainment.[5] The footage of Don Quixote in the cinema that is in Bonanni's possession has turned up on YouTube.[15]

Spanish film critic Juan Cobos saw a rough cut of Welles's unfinished footage (which he praised very highly), and stated that the 1992 edit by Franco bore little resemblance to it. Similarly, Jonathan Rosenbaumdescribes the 45 minutes of footage assembled in 1986 as being vastly superior to the Franco edit.

On Don Quixote and the subject of the artist's rights over their work—particularly the right not to finish—film scholars Jean-Paul Berthomé and François Thomas wrote that "the so-called completed version, hastily cobbled together in 1992 by Jesús Franco … merely created a sense of regret that posterity does not always respect this right not to finish."[17]

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11 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

There is quite a lot on the subject on its wikipedia page.  They had this about the 1992 Jess Franco version...

The Irigoyen and Franco work premiered at the 1992 Cannes Film Festival as Don Quixote de Orson Welles, with English- and Spanish-language versions produced. Initial reaction was predominantly negative, and this version was never theatrically released in the U.S. In September 2008, a U.S. DVD edition was released as Orson Welles' Don Quixote by Image Entertainment.[5] The footage of Don Quixote in the cinema that is in Bonanni's possession has turned up on YouTube.[15]

Spanish film critic Juan Cobos saw a rough cut of Welles's unfinished footage (which he praised very highly), and stated that the 1992 edit by Franco bore little resemblance to it. Similarly, Jonathan Rosenbaumdescribes the 45 minutes of footage assembled in 1986 as being vastly superior to the Franco edit.

On Don Quixote and the subject of the artist's rights over their work—particularly the right not to finish—film scholars Jean-Paul Berthomé and François Thomas wrote that "the so-called completed version, hastily cobbled together in 1992 by Jesús Franco … merely created a sense of regret that posterity does not always respect this right not to finish."[17]

Yes, I read all that on Wiki and even elsewhere. Interesting to be sure. I'm less concerned with history at the moment. I'm concerned on how good I thought the Netflix copy I got was and was surprised to read that you apparently thought it was a "mess" or at least Franco's edit of it. I'm sure that's the one I saw. I guess I thought you would like it better.

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31 minutes ago, laffite said:

Yes, I read all that on Wiki and even elsewhere. Interesting to be sure. I'm less concerned with history at the moment. I'm concerned on how good I thought the Netflix copy I got was and was surprised to read that you apparently thought it was a "mess" or at least Franco's edit of it. I'm sure that's the one I saw. I guess I thought you would like it better.

You might like this article from welles net.com

https://www.wellesnet.com/orson-welles-don-quixote-the-enigma/

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This is a bit ahead in the schedule, but does anyone know what's being shown on November 29th in the late-night TCM Underground slot? Looking at the TCM Underground thread, I had posted that The Pyramid (1976) was scheduled, as well as a "???" which would have meant the schedule was blank in that spot when first posted.

However, I just perused the schedule, and The Pyramid is no longer listed. They have Marty coming on at 12:15AM ET, and then the schedule jumps to 4:00AM ET, with a short (Changing from 1971) followed by something called Drug Stories from 2019. Marty is only 94 minutes, so even if they pad with commentary and interstitials, it still wouldn't run more than an hour and 45 minutes, meaning something will be on 2:00 AM.

EDIT: It appears that The Pyramid still shows up on the weekly schedule, just not the daily one. And I can't find anything about Drug Stories on IMDb.

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5 hours ago, TomJH said:

Gregory Peck, a class act, insisted that the little known Audrey Hepburn receive billing above the title with him. They would remain lifelong friends.

William Wyler had a good feeling about Hepburn after seeing her screen test and, even though she was a film novice, insisted upon holding off production on the film until after the actress had finished a stage run of Gigi.

In her excitement at winning the Academy Award Hepburn left her Oscar in the ladies room. (They would soon be reunited).

Always enjoy ROMAN HOLIDAY,  Audrey at her loveliest and Gregory Peck at his most charming.

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2 minutes ago, laffite said:

Thanks for all the links. Appreciate them all. I was looking for what you might think of it in your own words. This last link does look good though and I'll certainly have a look at it. Thanks, again.

The truth is I cannot recall much of that version and I've seen outtakes and such on youtube so it kind of became one big jumble for me.  Perhaps it is not that bad but everyone who saw Welles' 45 minute incomplete rough cut thought that was much better than what Franco managed to do. The article I just sent tries to compare the versions.

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8 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

The truth is I cannot recall much of that version and I've seen outtakes and such on youtube so it kind of became one big jumble for me.  Perhaps it is not that bad but everyone who saw Welles' 45 minute incomplete rough cut thought that was much better than what Franco managed to do. The article I just sent tries to compare the versions.

I see, thanks. And I am assuming that what i have seen is the '92 version Franco edit, but Netflix is not absolutely clear about that. If you haven't seen that one, then I am not surprised that it might be a jumble per youtube. Or if, perhaps, you haven't seen it from beginning to end, per the Netflix version.

Netflix users don't seem sympathetic. But comparing this with the novel and arguments like that is totally besides the point. My appreciation for what I saw begins with the notion that we are lucky beyond belief to see what can be seen. This may have never seen the light of day. And as I said before there is enough in the film of the Welles touch to give it considerable value. For me, anyway. We don't, of course, have the completed, definitive Welles stamp with this movie, but short of that, we have at least something and I like what i see.

Thanks, Bogie. Great links.

///

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12 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Monday, November 25

Green_for_Danger_1946_8.jpg

11:30 a.m.  Green For Danger (1946).  Everyone shines in this good British murder mystery.

Bogie, I was just going to recommend this movie! Great minds think alike. The film closely follows the novel by Christianna Brand. If you like Agatha Christie, you might try Christianna Brand as well.

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Tuesday, November 26

Bette Davis day.

62c6e8d3eed7227046e3576b695c90f7.jpg

6 a.m.  Winter Meeting (1948).  This is one that I have yet to see.  Replaced in Canada by The Unfaithful (1947) with Ann Sheridan.  The Unfaithful is a remake of The Letter.

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1 hour ago, Bogie56 said:

Tuesday, November 26

Bette Davis day.

62c6e8d3eed7227046e3576b695c90f7.jpg

6 a.m.  Winter Meeting (1948).  This is one that I have yet to see.  Replaced in Canada by The Unfaithful (1947) with Ann Sheridan.  The Unfaithful is a remake of The Letter.

I like "The Unfaithful".  The cast is fine, and the dialog is pretty good (especially the scene toward the end between Eve Arden, who does most of the talking and Zachary Scott).  Is it a mystery as to why "Winter Meeting" isn't being shown in Canada?  A young-ish looking Jim Davis plays opposite Bette Davis in this one.  Until I saw this movie several years ago, the only thing I remember about him first and foremost was that he played "Dallas" patriarch, Jock Ewing when that TV series premiered in the late 70's.  

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On 11/22/2019 at 4:22 AM, laffite said:

I recall a Russian 1957 version of DonQ and our hero attacks and get caught in the spokes/lattice of the arms goes round and round.

Just for correction. Not the 1957 Russian version, rather the 1933 version, per the below link. A Classic Arts Showcase clip came on last night with that windmill sequence, which sets me aright. Welles was no doubt cognizant of this. The two versions certainly have a similar look despite being some 25-30 years apart.  

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0023956/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

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3 hours ago, midwestan said:

I like "The Unfaithful".  The cast is fine, and the dialog is pretty good (especially the scene toward the end between Eve Arden, who does most of the talking and Zachary Scott).  Is it a mystery as to why "Winter Meeting" isn't being shown in Canada?  A young-ish looking Jim Davis plays opposite Bette Davis in this one.  Until I saw this movie several years ago, the only thing I remember about him first and foremost was that he played "Dallas" patriarch, Jock Ewing when that TV series premiered in the late 70's.  

I really liked The Unfaithful as well.  I appreciated that while it used the same source material and general plot of The Letter, it wasn't a shot by shot remake.  There are enough differences in The Unfaithful that it can stand alone as its own film without countless comparisons between the other two versions of the story. 

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On 11/23/2019 at 9:05 AM, TomJH said:

Gregory Peck, a class act, insisted that the little known Audrey Hepburn receive billing above the title with him. They would remain lifelong friends.

William Wyler had a good feeling about Hepburn after seeing her screen test and, even though she was a film novice, insisted upon holding off production on the film until after the actress had finished a stage run of Gigi.

In her excitement at winning the Academy Award Hepburn left her Oscar in the ladies room. (They would soon be reunited).

I forgot this was on. Even though I've seen it dozens of times, I was ticked. :(

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5 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Tuesday, November 26

Bette Davis day.

62c6e8d3eed7227046e3576b695c90f7.jpg

6 a.m.  Winter Meeting (1948).  This is one that I have yet to see.  Replaced in Canada by The Unfaithful (1947) with Ann Sheridan.  The Unfaithful is a remake of The Letter.

You aren't missing anything!

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8 hours ago, midwestan said:

A young-ish looking Jim Davis plays opposite Bette Davis in this one.  Until I saw this movie several years ago, the only thing I remember about him first and foremost was that he played "Dallas" patriarch, Jock Ewing when that TV series premiered in the late 70's.  

You mean you never saw him starring in Monster From Green Hell?

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