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Bogie56

HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM

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Monday, January 6

Monday night's schedule has been completely rearranged since it was first announced.  My original pick at 10:15 p.m.  of Body and Soul (1947) has been scratched.  But I am pleased to see that this one from the original January 23 schedule appears on Monday ...

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8 p.m.  Scandal: The Trial of Mary Astor (2018).  Something I knew nothing about.  Set for a repeat at 1 a.m.

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On 1/4/2020 at 6:07 AM, Bogie56 said:

Sunday, January 5

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8 a.m.  Sally (1930).  Featuring Marilyn Miller who Maltin says was a Broadway sensation in the 20’s.  I had never heard of her.

Neither have I.  But watching it this morning I got a kick out of seeing JOE E. BROWN play something other in a movie besides a country yokel and/or some other kind of goofball.  

Sepiatone

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The lineup of Mary Astor films for Monday night is certainly strong. If you haven't seen Scandal, the documentary about her sensational divorce and custody case, I think fans of Mary Astor would enjoy it. It's also nice that TCM is showing two 1949 films back to back, with Mary Astor as Marmee in Little Women and then as a lower-class prostitute in Act of Violence.

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Tuesday, January 7

Patricia Neal SOTM

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8 p.m.  The Fountainhead (1949).  Controversial Ann Rand film with Gary Cooper and Neal.  I didn’t care for it much.  Replaced in Canada with The Night Digger (1971) which has a story a lot like Night Must Fall.

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I thought The Fountainhead was incredibly awful, with normally good performers turning in some of the worst performances of their careers, no doubt due to the laughable script.

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I don't really mind watching "The Fountainhead".  It's an unusual movie, not only for its time, but any time, really.  The one thing I did enjoy about the film was the interior of Gary Cooper's apartment; absolutely loved it!

Additionally, I loved Mary Astor's performance in "Act of Violence".  It was so different from what we're used to seeing of her in standard TCM fare.

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Wednesday, January 8

I don't see this one in the American or Canadian schedule any longer.  There is just a big blank in this time slot.  So maybe it is on and maybe it isn't? 

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10:15 p.m.  The St. Valentine’s Day Massacre (1967).  One of Roger Corman’s best.    Good cast and classic narration by Paul Frees.

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Paul Frees (1920-1986).

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20 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

I thought The Fountainhead was incredibly awful, with normally good performers turning in some of the worst performances of their careers, no doubt due to the laughable script.

It was THE SHOWGIRLS of its time. Only with no nudity or fish-flopping sex scenes.

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I know we're a little divided on GARY COOPER here (and for the record, some times I think he's fine and some times i think he's terrible), but THE FOUNTAINHEAD is actually EXHIBIT A in the CASE FOR GARY COOPER WAS A GOOD ACTOR, because the fact that he was able to commit to the complete batshIttery of the whole venture and recite some of the wooooorst dialogue ever  (often in interminable scenes with no cuts or edits) is compelling.

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On 1/5/2020 at 11:24 AM, Sepiatone said:

Neither have I.  But watching it this morning I got a kick out of seeing JOE E. BROWN play something other in a movie besides a country yokel and/or some other kind of goofball.  

Sepiatone

No one has heard of Marilyn Miller? She was a big Broadway star of the 20s-30s. She made some film musicals in the early 30s. Died young. Marilyn Monroe was named after her (the Marilyn part). A statue of her stood above Broadway in NY. Unsure if it's still there, but it probably is.

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On 1/5/2020 at 5:19 AM, Bogie56 said:

Monday, January 6

Monday night's schedule has been completely rearranged since it was first announced.  My original pick at 10:15 p.m.  of Body and Soul (1947) has been scratched.  But I am pleased to see that this one from the original January 23 schedule appears on Monday ...

8 p.m.  Scandal: The Trial of Mary Astor (2018).  Something I knew nothing about.  Set for a repeat at 1 a.m.

Thought I should mention here that TCM switched the original primetime programming lineup on the 6th and the 23rd, so Body and Soul (1947) and others are now scheduled to be shown on the evening of Thursday, January 23rd.  This evening is part of the "Overlooked African American Performances" theme, which is also the primetime theme for Monday, January 20 (MLK day).

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THE FOUNTAINHEAD has too many compelling virtues, including the direction of King Vidor and the towering, swirling musical score of Max Steiner (one of his best) to be dismissed. And who can forget the erotic symbolism of that pneumatic drill in the quarry pit scene as a fevered Patricia Neal watches? As stilted and unreal as the dialogue may be in that bizarre trial scene I appreciate the daring courage of Gary Cooper for putting his wholesome all American screen image on the line by a scene in which, in essence, he rapes Neal (or, at least, as close to rape as the Production Code would allow).

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I actually read the book before ever seeing the movie, which left me feeling Cooper was horribly miscast.  Going by  Rand's novel description, I pictured someone who looked like a young JAMES SPADER  in the role of Roarke.  But I can't think of any actor from back then who also fits that description.   Possibly  RICHARD WIDMARK, or in that arena.

Sepiatone

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Just now, Sepiatone said:

I actually read the book before ever seeing the movie, which left me feeling Cooper was horribly miscast.  Going by  Rand's novel description, I pictured someone who looked like a young JAMES SPADER  in the role of Roarke.  But I can't think of any actor from back then who also fits that description.   Possibly  RICHARD WIDMARK, or in that arena.

Sepiatone

Vidor wanted Bogart.

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OH?   Kinda old for that part, eh whot?  ;) 

Sepiatone

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Stanwyck really wanted the Neal part.

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On 1/2/2020 at 9:10 AM, Bogie56 said:

Friday, January 3

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4:45 p.m.  The Whip Hand (1951).  This one sounds bizarre.  A lake where fish mysteriously die and a group of former Nazis turned Commies are holed up nearby.  Nazis turned Commies?  I guess they aren’t too discerning as long as they can be bad.

This turned out to be good! Had never heard of the film, and missed the beginning, but  held my attention throughout!

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On 1/2/2020 at 12:53 PM, LawrenceA said:

That's the one that, after filming was done, Howard Hughes watched it and declared that Nazis were no longer relevant villains, and to change them to Communists. I saw it last year or so, and thought it was entertaining if  more than a bit silly.

LOL! Was a gripping thriller type film as long as you didn't dwell too much on the storyline.........

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2 hours ago, Hibi said:

No one has heard of Marilyn Miller? She was a big Broadway star of the 20s-30s. She made some film musicals in the early 30s. Died young. Marilyn Monroe was named after her (the Marilyn part). A statue of her stood above Broadway in NY. Unsure if it's still there, but it probably is.

Marilyn's statue is still there, restored, at 46th and Broadway in the I.Miller shoe building, now an Express clothing store.  The statues were there since 1929, fell into disarray with Times Square and were recently restored.

The other ladies depicted in statuary are Mary Pickford, Ethel Barrymore and Rosa Ponselle.  Marilyn is second from the left.

The I. Miller building is one of the oldest non-theatre structures facing Times Square, and the entire restoration now makes it one of the best preserved. The statues were originally executed by Alexander Calder, a noted artist of his day, whose works include the statue of Washington on the north side of the Washington Square Arch. (Today, he is best remembered as the father of mobile artist Alexander Calder.)

The four actresses were actually not Miller's own choices, but selected by the public, who were asked to choose one each from the fields of drama, comedy, opera and screen to honor. All four were remembered for performances that were then fresh in the public's memory: Barrymore played Ophelia in Hamlet in 1925 on Broadway, Marilyn Miller starred in Sunny in 1925, Pickford starred as Little Lord Fauntleroy in a 1921 film and Rosa Ponselle portrayed Norma at the Metropolitan Opera in 1927.

 

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Thanks for the picture and info!

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I had actually walked by this building every morning for years and never knew anything about it; it was a TGI Friday's restaurant for a long time and their signage covered up the statues!  The building is landmark protected and the statues couldn't be touched until it was realized the poor condition they were in when the entire facade was restored.

 

 

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That's funny. I'm glad they are still there. So much of Times Square is history now.

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Thursday, January 9

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10 p.m.  I am Somebody (1970).  Documentary short about black hospital workers in South Carolina who go on strike then the Governor calls out the National Guard.  Restored by the Library of Congress,

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