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HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM


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6 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I get the feeling that, as with JOHN HUSTON, the LESS I KNOW ABOUT JOHN FORD, the better. He made some terrific, timeless and very honest movies, but in real life...I think he was very likely a horrible, horrible person.

Maybe so but he was well liked and admired by most who worked with him.  I didn't come away with a bad impression of him after reading McBride's great book but he defiantly hardened as he got older.

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4 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Maybe so but he was well liked and admired by most who worked with him.  I didn't come away with a bad impression of him after reading McBride's great book but he defiantly hardened as he got older.

interesting. i've read blurbs here and there that he was prone to berating actors who worked with him, that was a closeted homosexual and even that (seriously) his films were a front for financing WHITE SUPREMACY ORGANIZATIONS- so I never know what to believe.

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

OSCAR MONTH INSISTS ON CONTINUING.

If anyone wants to check out one of the LEAST IMPRESSIVE PERFORMANCES to ever garner a lead nomination for acting, MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION (1954) is on this morning.

Boy, ROCK sure looks comfortable in this publicity shot, huh?

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Rock is actually thinking: "What was the name of that guy last night . . . Ben? Bill? Biff?"

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

interesting. i've read blurbs here and there that he was prone to berating actors who worked with him, that was a closeted homosexual and even that (seriously) his films were a front for financing WHITE SUPREMACY ORGANIZATIONS- so I never know what to believe.

In Maureen O'Hara memoirs she mentions walking into his office and seeing Ford in an embrace with a well known actor. She didn't name the actor. Can't picture anyone going for Ford, unless it was to curry favor.....

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8 hours ago, Hibi said:

In Maureen O'Hara memoirs she mentions walking into his office and seeing Ford in an embrace with a well known actor. She didn't name the actor. Can't picture anyone going for Ford, unless it was to curry favor.....

In context it seems pretty clear that the actor was Tyrone Power.

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Wednesday, February 12

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8 p.m.  To Be or Not to Be (1942).   When Paul Gross of Due South fame played Hamlet at Stratford Ontario I was sorely tempted to take a middle seat and like Robert Stack get up at the start of his soliloquy and slowly and painfully exit the theatre.  In in the end I was perhaps too cheap to fork out for a ticket.  I love the prompter gag too.

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Friday, February 14

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2 p.m.  Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams (1973).  I thought Martin Balsam was great in this one.  And Sylvia Sydney proved she still had it.

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7 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Friday, February 14

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2 p.m.  Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams (1973).  I thought Martin Balsam was great in this one.  And Sylvia Sydney proved she still had it.

Agreed, they were both brilliant in it.

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Saturday, February 15

Hey, the Oscars are old news now.

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4 p.m.  The Third Man (1949).  Fantastic film by Carol Reed.  In Canada this is replaced by Jack of Diamonds (1967).  Not so fantastic.

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Sunday, February 16

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6 p.m.  The Philadelphia Story (1940).  Enjoyable George Cukor film.  James Stewart won the Best Actor Oscar.  My vote would have gone to Charlie Chaplin for The Great Dictator.

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2 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Sunday, February 16

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6 p.m.  The Philadelphia Story (1940).  Enjoyable George Cukor film.  James Stewart won the Best Actor Oscar.  My vote would have gone to Charlie Chaplin for The Great Dictator.

I would give Chaplin the Oscar. I thought Stewart deserved it for “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.” I actually would have given Chaplin the Oscar for “City Lights.” I just saw it in the theater (35mm) a month ago.  It’s so cute! I’d seen it before on TCM. 

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6 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I would give Chaplin the Oscar. I thought Stewart deserved it for “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington.” I actually would have given Chaplin the Oscar for “City Lights.” I just saw it in the theater (35mm) a month ago.  It’s so cute! I’d seen it before on TCM. 

I agree about Mr. Washington.  That's great that you saw City Lights with an audience.  It really makes a difference.

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9 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Sunday, February 16

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6 p.m.  The Philadelphia Story (1940).  Enjoyable George Cukor film.  James Stewart won the Best Actor Oscar.  My vote would have gone to Charlie Chaplin for The Great Dictator.

I love THE PHILADELPHIA STORY, but I agree with the majority that Stewart's Oscar for this film was a make up award for losing out for MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON the previous year.

However, my vote would have gone to Henry Fonda in THE GRAPES OF WRATH. Not that Chaplin wasn't good in THE GREAT DICTATOR, but Fonda just impressed me a wee bit more.

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Monday, February 17

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10:15 p.m.  One Hour With You (1932).  Ernst Lubitsch film with Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette MacDonald.  I'm not that much of a fan of either star but with the right project and director it's a different story.

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10 minutes ago, Fedya said:

You're not a fan of creepy Maurice singing "Thank Heaven for Little Girls" in Gigi?

That post was meant for Bogie but just wanted to say that Gigi is the only performance of Maurice's that I like. I always found him "creepy" and I pass on watching a film when I see he's in it but since Bogie recommends One Hour with You, I'll give it a try but only because it's a Lubitsch film.

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I like Maurice, as long as he's NOT singing! I thought he was very good as Audrey Hepburn's father in LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON (Gary Cooper was kind of the creeper in that one, Yes?)

I also thought his marriage to Leslie Caron in FANNY was surprisingly sweet.

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1 hour ago, lavenderblue19 said:

That post was meant for Bogie but just wanted to say that Gigi is the only performance of Maurice's that I like. I always found him "creepy" and I pass on watching a film when I see he's in it but since Bogie recommends One Hour with You, I'll give it a try but only because it's a Lubitsch film.

Lavenderblue, please do NOT let your aversion to Chevalier stop you from seeing director Rouben Mamoulian's delightful LOVE ME TONIGHT (1932), also co-starring Jeanette MacDonald. It's a musical comedy of inventiveness and great infectious charm that first brought, among other songs, Rodgers and Hart's "Isn't It Romantic?" to the world. In another scene, we see Sir C. Aubrey Smith (in a night gown) singing some of the lyrics to "Mimi" and looking like he's having a great time!

And the film is also clever funny. Myrna Loy, in a supporting role, plays a man hungry woman. At one point Charlie Ruggles asks her, "Could you go for a doctor?" to which Myrna replies, "Sure, bring him in!"

This film is clearly Lubitsch-inspired but many think that Mamoulian out-Lubitsched Lubitsch here.

TCM has shown this gem in the past but, since it's a Paramount film, you may also want to check out your library as KINO released it on DVD a few years ago, as well as a release from the Universal Vault Series.

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I still like that opening in which Maurice, standing in the doorway of his tailor shop, watches marathon runners trot by and suddenly  one separates from the group and runs into his store.  Turns out it's an acquaintance of his in need of a suit of clothes in a hurry, having had to leave his behind when the husband of his paramour came home earlier than expected, and he dodged out a window with a number hurriedly scrawled on the back of his undershirt in order to be undetected in the crowd of marathon runners.  :D  

All the arcane and overwrought singing aside, it's a fun watch.

Sepiatone

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I find Jeanette McDonald’s singing to be very grating on the ears. But I like Ernst Lubitsch, so I may record this film and give it a try. 

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