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HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM


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I'm excited for Moonrise on this evening.  I've been trying to see this film forever.  I've literally had it on hold at the library since last summer and they still haven't fulfilled my request--I'm guessing that the branch of the library that has it is closed for COVID. Anyway, I have this set to record and am excited to watch it.

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5 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I'm excited for Moonrise on this evening.  I've been trying to see this film forever.  I've literally had it on hold at the library since last summer and they still haven't fulfilled my request--I'm guessing that the branch of the library that has it is closed for COVID. Anyway, I have this set to record and am excited to watch it.

"Among the movies he made in the second half of his career, Moonrise (1948) is acknowledged by some cinema scholars as Frank Borzage's late period masterpiece, a film that is both a summation of the director's thematic concerns and a visually stunning marriage of pictorial lyricism with noir sensibilities. It stands out from any other American film made in the forties and is closer in tone and mood to the poetic realism movement in French cinema during the thirties (Julien Duvivier's Pepe le Moko [1937], Marcel Carne's Port of Shadows [1938]). ......

To save money, Borzage ruled out location shooting and filmed Moonrise on only two sound stages for 30 different scenes. While this accounts for the film's artificial and highly stylized art direction, it also produces a claustrophobic, fever-dream intensity that works as an extension of Danny's world view, one which begins in brooding darkness and eventually sees the dawning light. The only other film that comes close to possessing the same dream/nightmare logic as Moonrise is Charles Laughton's The Night of the Hunter ..............

see:   https://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/83958/moonrise#articles-reviews?articleId=276624

:)

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I didn't care much for Moonrise at all. Disappointing. Very similar to Clark's Deep Valley the year before in story and setting. (Valley, I thought, was far superior and Gail Russell is no Ida Lupino). Well acted and photographed, but that's about it. At least it was short.

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17 hours ago, mr6666 said:

"Among the movies he made in the second half of his career, Moonrise (1948) is acknowledged by some cinema scholars as Frank Borzage's late period masterpiece, a film that is both a summation of the director's thematic concerns and a visually stunning marriage of pictorial lyricism with noir sensibilities. It stands out from any other American film made in the forties and is closer in tone and mood to the poetic realism movement in French cinema during the thirties (Julien Duvivier's Pepe le Moko [1937], Marcel Carne's Port of Shadows [1938]). ......

To save money, Borzage ruled out location shooting and filmed Moonrise on only two sound stages for 30 different scenes. While this accounts for the film's artificial and highly stylized art direction, it also produces a claustrophobic, fever-dream intensity that works as an extension of Danny's world view, one which begins in brooding darkness and eventually sees the dawning light. The only other film that comes close to possessing the same dream/nightmare logic as Moonrise is Charles Laughton's The Night of the Hunter ..............

see:   https://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/83958/moonrise#articles-reviews?articleId=276624

:)

Sorry, but I don't agree with your assessment.

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Vertigo is on at 4 AM Friday morning.  True star of the movie is Jimmy Stewart's 1956 De Soto Firedome Sportsman.  Hitchcock gave it a fair amount of attention.  

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1:45 PM on Friday, Bachelor in Paradise.  Lots of late 50's Chrysler products - in color.

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Saturday, February 13

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12:15 p.m.  Gigi (1958).  Multi-Oscar winning musical remake of the 1949 French film.  For me, Louis Jourdan missed the mark that Frank Villard (below) nailed in the original.  In that version, Gaston is comically unaware that he is no match for Gigi.

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14 hours ago, mr6666 said:

not mine......this was from TCM article by Jeff Stafford

(I pretty well agree with you)

:)

Oh, ok. Never mind! LOL.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

wait a minute.

has OSCAR MONTH STARTED???????

Watched (again) last night,  a fine film I'm sure you are aware of on MOVIES-TV.     And don't worry I didn't cry.

But I did notice the hard as nails dialog,  especially by Joan.

 

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:o

Casablanca.....  AGAIN??

Jeez....  Hitch must be spinning in his grave that this movie's frequency numbers are quickly catching up to the NORTH BY NORTHWEST bar!  ;) 

Sepiatone

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4 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

:o

Casablanca.....  AGAIN??

Jeez....  Hitch must be spinning in his grave that this movie's frequency numbers are quickly catching up to the NORTH BY NORTHWEST bar!  ;) 

Sepiatone

It seems to be on every other week lately.

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6 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Sunday, February 14

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8 p.m.  The Age of Innocence (1993).  I know that for some this is the best Scorsese picture.

If Harvey Keitel isn't in it then it's not his best. 😊

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

UH-oh...............

A movie from the '90's

SOMEbody's gonna be upset!  ;) 

Sepiatone

I know! And it's not quite 30 years old yet!

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Monday, February 15

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8 p.m.  In Cold Blood (1967).  I had the remarkable good fortune of having Conrad Hall do a lecture for our University class and go through a reel of this film.

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Another on my short list of "Movies as good as the book."  Which I read long before ever seeing the movie.  And I can't complain about the casting at all.  

Sepiatone

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5 hours ago, Bogie56 said:

Monday, February 15

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8 p.m.  In Cold Blood (1967).  I had the remarkable good fortune of having Conrad Hall do a lecture for our University class and go through a reel of this film.

IN COLD BLOOD is another of those movies I almost fear to rewatch. It was terrific, even as it's hard to watch. It's one of those "a visit to the dentist" films.

To me, a great movie about a true story is one where even as you know what is going to happen and how it's going to end you can't stop watching. APOLLO 13  also comes to mind. The scene in IN COLD BLOOD where Robert Blake's character finally breaks and goes on his killing rampage is horrifying. However, Scott Wilson's reaction to  it is extraordinary. His going from the smug, slick hipster "leader of the pack" to a stunned, horrified witness to  his accomplice's barbarity makes the scene, if not the movie.

Scott Wilson was an underappreciated talent IMHO.

It's a shame what became of Robert Blake and his career.  My favorite Blake turn, for what it's worth, was ELECTRA GLIDE IN BLUE. I think that is underappreciated as well.

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5 hours ago, MrMagoo said:

Scott Wilson was an underappreciated talent IMHO.

 

Absolutely agree. Scott Wilson looks very much like a guy I went to junior high with. He's someone who looks like a Southerner. He deserved a much bigger career.

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43 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Absolutely agree. Scott Wilson looks very much like a guy I went to junior high with. He's someone who looks like a Southerner. He deserved a much bigger career.

He was born in Georgia.  Not sure what "looks like a Southerner" is supposed to mean.

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