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HITS & MISSES: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow on TCM


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 The only good thing about Seventh Victim were a few genuinely eerie scenes, mostly those shot in the dark claustrophobic streets near the film's conclusion. A few others, perhaps.

 

However, these scenes just prove that shadowy evocative cinematography is not enough. The story of The Seventh Victim was labyrinthine and made no sense.It felt as though the screenwriter was making it up as he went along.

 

I agree with you. The "plot" of this film, if there is one, doesn't make much sense. Looks to me it is mostly a story about a mentally ill girl.

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I agree with you. The "plot" of this film, if there is one, doesn't make much sense. Looks to me it is mostly a story about a mentally ill girl.

 

Yes,  The Seventh Victim is a case where using the film technique of style over substance wasn't successful.     

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Sunday, November 1

 

8 a.m.  Tortilla Flat (1942)  Wonderful Victor Fleming comedy with great supporting performances by Frank Morgan, Akim Tamiroff, John Qualen, Sheldon Leonard and Allen Jenkins.

 

midnight.  The Crowd (1928).  Good King Vidor film!

 
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Sunday, November 1

 

8 a.m.  Tortilla Flat (1942)  Wonderful Victor Fleming comedy with great supporting performances by Frank Morgan, Akim Tamiroff, John Qualen, Sheldon Leonard and Allen Jenkins.

And one of the best examples of a hierophany on film: the dogs having a vision of St. Francis. Terry (who played Toto for director Fleming in another movie) is one of those dogs. Frank Morgan is brilliant -- he should have won the Supporting Actor Oscar, for which he was nominated.

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And one of the best examples of a hierophany on film: the dogs having a vision of St. Francis. Terry (who played Toto for director Fleming in another movie) is one of those dogs. Frank Morgan is brilliant -- he should have won the Supporting Actor Oscar, for which he was nominated.

I wonder if the friends of Speedy Gonzales were based on the characters that Qualen, Leonard and Jenkins played in Tortilla Flat?

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Saturday, October 31/1


2:45 a.m.  I don’t know if I can stomach these David Lynch shorts?


 


I'd really like to know who watched these and what they thought of them.


Lynch strikes me as the sort who goes out of his way to be distasteful for shock value. 

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Saturday, October 31/1

2:45 a.m.  I don’t know if I can stomach these David Lynch shorts?

 

I'd really like to know who watched these and what they thought of them.

Lynch strikes me as the sort who goes out of his way to be distasteful for shock value. 

 

I did & you're pretty much right.

Kind of 'got' "Grandmother". Visually clever with sort of a point to it.

Got the idea of 'Dumbland' though tiresome & unpleasant to sit through.

Only one I found amusing was the last "Ants", where 'Randy' finally gets a comeuppance.

Guess I was hoping for a more Terry Gilliam type approach.

But then it was Lynch after all & never was a big fan. Felt relieved when it was over.

:(

Used to enjoy the 'Underground' features, but haven't liked their showings for some months now. Different programmer, I guess.

Just not to my taste.

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Yeah, I'm coming to believe that my David Lynch tolerance is fairly low. It doesn't take a whole lot to repel me when one really tries- and boy how he tries. What I find interesting and amusing in his work is outweighed by that. That was my experience when watching Eraserhead, too, whereas my brother seemed to feel more the other way- he was more entertained than annoyed. Like it's a sliding scale. I liked Eraserhead more than what I saw of these shorts, but his use of repetitive noises gets on my nerves immediately.

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Monday, November 2

 

I see Christmas decorations are in some stores already!  Geesh.

 

11:30 p.m.  Duck Soup (1933).  I never tire of some of the gags in this film.  And Louis Calhern is a hoot too.

 

 

 
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Norma Shearer Silents night: All times E.S.T.:

 

9:15--"A Lady of Chance"--(1928)--Shearer as a con-woman, with Johnny Mack Brown as a potential victim.

 

12:45 a.m. "He Who Gets Slapped"--(1924)--Lon Chaney Sr., Shearer, & John Gilbert in circus  tale.

 

2:15 a. m.--"Laugh, Clown, Laugh"--(1928)--Lon Chaney Sr. & teen-aged Loretta Young in melodrama.

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Tuesday, November 3

 

Lots of Robert Mitchum films Tuesday.

 

12:30 p.m.  One Minute to Zero (1952)

 

4:40 p.m.  The Angry Hills (1959)  … I haven’t seen either of these two before

 
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Wednesday, November 4

 

8 a.m.  Escape Me Never (1947).  I’ve seen the Elisabeth Bergner 1935 version but not this Errol Flynn one.

 

5:45 p.m.  Five Miles to Midnight (1963).  I caught a few 1950’s Sophia Loren films this summer and really enjoyed them.  I haven’t seen this one.  It doesn’t look too promising, but what they heck.

 
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Wed., Nov.4th--All times E.S.T.:

 

11:15 a.m.--"Slaughter Trail"--(1951)--I decided this was a must-see when I saw Maltin described it as "indescribably awful".  In case Maltin's right, Don't Say You Weren't Warned.

 

9:45 p.m.--"Gone With the Wind"--(1939)

 

And one early Thursday, Nov 5th:

 

6:00 a.m.--"Sweet Kitty Bellairs"--(1930)--farce/operetta that runs just over 1 hour,  Was originally in 2 Tone Technicolor, but the color prints are Lost; all that survives is black and white.  A good musical released in the fall of 1930 when ALL musicals flopped at the box office.

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5:45 p.m.  Five Miles to Midnight (1963).  I caught a few 1950’s Sophia Loren films this summer and really enjoyed them.  I haven’t seen this one.  It doesn’t look too promising, but what they heck.

 

 

I like it very much. I believe that you will not be disappointed.

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Wed., Nov.4th--All times E.S.T.:

 

11:15 a.m.--"Slaughter Trail"--(1951)--I decided this was a must-see when I saw Maltin described it as "indescribably awful".  In case Maltin's right, Don't Say You Weren't Warned.

Plus, Andy Devine is right up there in the credits.

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Wednesday, November 4

 

8 a.m.  Escape Me Never (1947).  I’ve seen the Elisabeth Bergner 1935 version but not this Errol Flynn one.

 

5:45 p.m.  Five Miles to Midnight (1963).  I caught a few 1950’s Sophia Loren films this summer and really enjoyed them.  I haven’t seen this one.  It doesn’t look too promising, but what they heck.

 

I'm sure it won't surprise you that I enjoyed Escape Me Never.  While this film is definitely not among one of Flynn's best, it has its moments.  I'd probably rate it 2.5/4 stars.  I think Flynn and Ida Lupino's performances really make the film.  Eleanor Parker is fine, but she's had more interesting roles in other films.  Gig Young is about as interesting an unsalted, unflavored rice cake.  However, the film has interesting costumes and an intriguing setting and a beautiful Erich Wolfgang Korngold score.  

 

I think what is also interesting about this film is Errol's character.  While he's not a bad guy persay, he's lacking in some scruples.  However, his natural charm and charisma come through and you find yourself rooting for him (well I did anyway), even though, he doesn't deserve it.  It takes skill to make a cad likeable.

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Thursday, November 5

 

I think all of today's films have been on quite a few times.

 

1:15 p.m.  Rain (1932).  I’ve seen this one a few times and quite enjoyed the performances by Joan Crawford, Walter Huston and Beulah Bondi.

 

10:15 p.m.  The Three Musketeers (1973)  A great fun version of the classic by Richard Lester.

 
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I recorded Martin Ritt's THE SOUND AND THE FURY to watch later.

The movie apparently took a lot of liberties with the William Faulkner novel that it's based on. 

I love the book, especially the way the story is told from the perspectives of different characters with the final section being a third person narrative. 

In the movie it seems that Jason (played by Yul Brynner???) is the step-uncle of the female Quentin (Joanne Woodward) rather than a blood relative. From the TCM synopsis: "Jason's Cajun mother married Quentin's grandfather following the death of his first wife." Was the Cajun element added as an attempt to explain Yul Brynner's accent?

 

It doesn't seem like Quentin's namesake ---- her uncle Quentin who committed suicide --- is even in the movie.

 

In the novel, the section told from Jason's perspective has as its first sentence: "Once a b**** always a b****."

 

Has anyone seen the movie?

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Friday, November 6/7

 

3:30 a.m. Sat.  Originally scheduled, The Hunting Party (1971) with Oliver Reed has sadly been replaced with The Nanny (1965) the often scheduled Bette Davis film.  This is in both the U.S. and Canada.

 

 

5:06 a.m.  Sun..The Sand ..The Hill (1965)  a behind-the-scenes of one of my favourite Sidney Lumet films, The Hill (1965) with Sean Connery.  Made during his Bond years but without his toupee.  Ossie Davis, Roy Kinnear and the rest of the cast are great in this film.

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