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I Don't Get It, I Just Don't Get It!


TomJH
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Are there any films (no matter how good or even great the film may be) in which there is a element of the film, be in character motivation or story line, or whatever, which you just don't understand? You might have to think for a moment or two, but I'm thinking of those aspects of a film that you simply don't get.

 

Please feel free to unload your concerns on this thread.

 

Here's an illustration of one for me (and if anyone can provide an explanation I would appreciate it)

 

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In Frank Capra's LOST HORIZON Ronald Colman leaves Shangri La after being convinced by his brother that the Himalayan sanctuary is not a utopia, after all.

 

But one of the chief reasons that he is convinced of that is because of the character played by Margo, as seen in that pix above with Colman. Colman had been told by the High Lama that she was over a hundred years old but had been able to retain her youthful appearance by remaining in that valley. (Which doesn't say much for the High Lama's appearance, but that's another story).

 

But Margo convinces Colman that the High Lama lied to him ("Do I look like an old woman? Is this the skin of an old woman?") and pleads with him to let her leave with him and his brother and get away from Shangri La.

 

Okay, if you've seen the film you know the rest: the three of them ,and their porters, leave the valley; Margo suddenly dies, with a closeup of her face that of an ancient old woman (just like the High Lama predicted) and Colman afterwards is searching to find his Shangri La again.

 

My question: what gives with Margo's character? If, as it turns out, she really is an old woman, why does she lie about it in order to leave Shangri La, especially since she will rapidly age and it will cost her her life?

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I got the impression she did not know she was going to age if she left ... that she felt the High Lama was probably lying to her, and everyone else, to keep her there.

 

P.S. - I've always thought of this film as a road picture.

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 (Which doesn't say much for the High Lama's appearance, but that's another story).

 

 

 

It was LOOVE I think.  Defies logic.

 

That High Lama wasn't using the right facial cream, methinks.

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I got the impression she did not know she was going to age if she left ... that she felt the High Lama was probably lying to her, and everyone else, to keep her there.

 

P.S. - I've always thought of this film as a road picture.

I suppose that's a possibility. But she would still know that she was a reaaaaaaaaaally old woman, and was taking a huge chance in case the High Lama had it right (which, at it turns out, he did).

 

I've wondered if Margo's character may have mental health problems but that's merely a guess on my part. The film sure doesn't spell it out that she does.

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I suppose that's a possibility. But she would still know that she was a reaaaaaaaaaally old woman, and was taking a huge chance in case the High Lama had it right (which, at it turns out, he did).

 

I've wondered if Margo's character may have mental health problems but that's merely a guess on my part. The film sure doesn't spell it out that she does.

Delusional is in the right direction.  Looooove and 99 years of inattention

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Are there any films (no matter how good or even great the film may be) in which there is a element of the film, be in character motivation or story line, or whatever, which you just don't understand? You might have to think for a moment or two, but I'm thinking of those aspects of a film that you simply don't get.

 

Please feel free to unload your concerns on this thread.

 

Here's an illustration of one for me (and if anyone can provide an explanation I would appreciate it)

 

dd085f10-40e3-4182-a996-a438441ff586_zps

 

In Frank Capra's LOST HORIZON Ronald Colman leaves Shangri La after being convinced by his brother that the Himalayan sanctuary is not a utopia, after all.

 

But one of the chief reasons that he is convinced of that is because of the character played by Margo, as seen in that pix above with Colman. Colman had been told by the High Lama that she was over a hundred years old but had been able to retain her youthful appearance by remaining in that valley. (Which doesn't say much for the High Lama's appearance, but that's another story).

 

But Margo convinces Colman that the High Lama lied to him ("Do I look like an old woman? Is this the skin of an old woman?") and pleads with him to let her leave with him and his brother and get away from Shangri La.

 

Okay, if you've seen the film you know the rest: the three of them ,and their porters, leave the valley; Margo suddenly dies, with a closeup of her face that of an ancient old woman (just like the High Lama predicted) and Colman afterwards is searching to find his Shangri La again.

 

My question: what gives with Margo's character? If, as it turns out, she really is an old woman, why does she lie about it in order to leave Shangri La, especially since she will rapidly age and it will cost her her life?

 

 

Well, first, we are talking about an extreme-fantasy film, so it does not need to conform to normal physics or biology.

 

I figure that the girl is just bored and stir crazy, and wants to live in the normal outside world. Something like the way the brother thinks.

 

I think I might get a little bored living in that same little valley for 100-200 years. No movie theaters, no hamburgers, no football games, no musical concerts, etc.

 

So that is why I think she wants out. And, I think she really is 100 years old.

 

The sudden aging after she died was a unique oddity used as a special fantasy event to make a special point in the film. If the film used more normal physics and biology, she would have still looked young after she died, yet she would have been 100 years old. But we the audience had to see her "old" so we would know she really was 100.

 

The High Lama was 200 years old.

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I think the whole point of that was to suggest the somewhat universally held notion that one should never question the "wisdom" of their elders and/or the established power structure they're born into. In a way, this is very similar story to Lot's wife turning into a pillar of salt in the Old Testament.

 

Secondly, perhaps the character Margo played might have been thinking that the worst thing that could happen to her would be that she would begin to age naturally and at the rate of the outside world but not all at once.

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Secondly, perhaps the character Margo played might have been thinking that the worst thing that could happen to her would be that she would begin to age naturally and at the rate of the outside world but not all at once.

Did they explore this interesting aspect in that magnificent remake?  It has been too many years and brain cells since I have seen that one

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Well, first, we are talking about an extreme-fantasy film, so it does not need to conform to normal physics or biology.

 

I figure that the girl is just bored and stir crazy, and wants to live in the normal outside world. Something like the way the brother thinks.

 

I think I might get a little bored living in that same little valley for 100-200 years. No movie theaters, no hamburgers, no football games, no musical concerts, etc.

 

So that is why I think she wants out. And, I think she really is 100 years old.

 

The sudden aging after she died was a unique oddity used as a special fantasy event to make a special point in the film.

Yeh, stir crazy (emphasis on the crazy part) is a possibility, I suppose.

 

It could also be that she got one good look at Edward Everett Horton and thought, "That's it. I'm out here."

 

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"Hello, my dear. Care to see my rock collection?"

 

  (Just a theory. I could be wrong).

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I got the impression she did not know she was going to age if she left ... that she felt the High Lama was probably lying to her, and everyone else, to keep her there.

 

P.S. - I've always thought of this film as a road picture.

 

I agree with you to a degree;   to me the only logical and reasonable POV she could have had was that while living in Shangri La,  she STOPPED aging (or aged very, very slowly),  and that when she left she would start to age like everyone else but NOT all at once.

 

That is the impression she made to me when she says she wants to live life like a so called normal human being.

 

(PS:  Dargo made the same point before I did).

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I agree with you to a degree;   to me the only logical and reasonable POV she could have had was that while living in Shangri La,  she STOPPED aging (or aged very, very slowly),  and that when she left she would start to age like everyone else but NOT all at once.

 

Except that the High Lama gave dire warnings that that would not be the case.

 

Could be that Dargo's comment about the wisdom of the elderly being ignored is true (except for one thing: Margo wasn't young, she was old,  in spite of her appearance).

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Except that the High Lama gave dire warnings that that would not be the case.

 

Could be that Dargo's comment about the wisdom of the elderly being ignored is true (except for one thing: Margo wasn't young, she was old,  in spite of her appearance).

 

Ah, but, relative and in relation to the general demographic of Shangri La, she wasn't old, Tom.

 

(...gotta take that into consideration here too, I think)

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Except that the High Lama gave dire warnings that that would not be the case.

 

Could be that Dargo's comment about the wisdom of the elderly being ignored is true (except for one thing: Margo wasn't young, she was old,  in spite of her appearance).

 

Well of course she didn't believe the High Lama knew what he was talking about.   Clearly IF she believed what he said was the truth, well than she was just committing suicide since she had to know how many years she had been in the place.

 

She just had enough of the so called wisdom from a spiritual leader.  

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Ah, but, relative and in relation to the general demographic of Shangri La, she wasn't old, Tom.

 

(...gotta take that into consideration here too, I think)

You've got a point there, Dargo, certainly compared to the High Lama.

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Well of course she didn't believe the High Lama knew what he was talking about.   Clearly IF she believed what he said was the truth, well than she was just committing suicide since she had to know how many years she had been in the place.

 

She just had enough of the so called wisdom from a spiritual leader.  

Stubborn little young (old) brat! She paid a penalty for not listening to her elders.

 

So this is the answer? The folly of (relatively speaking) youth?

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Well of course she didn't believe the High Lama knew what he was talking about.   Clearly IF she believed what he said was the truth, well than she was just committing suicide since she had to know how many years she had been in the place.

 

She just had enough of the so called wisdom from a spiritual leader.  

 

In other words, she got tired of "bein' hassled by The Man"!!!

 

(...oops...sorry...this isn't that Bikerpalooza thread is it..never mind)

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Stubborn little young (old) brat! She paid a penalty for not listening to her elders.

 

So this is the answer? The folly of (relatively speaking) youth?

 

I never said I agreed with Dargo's take about the folly of youth.     Instead I said she just had enough of a spiritual leader (even the title High Lama makes me want to gag).     This does occur in real life even to those that have listen to a (or their),  spiritual leader for decades (or in this case 18 or so decades!).       

 

Anyhow,  what other solid options are out there?   Either she didn't know how old she was or she knew she would age,  big time, but didn't care.   Both of those are bogus options IMO.

 

So other then the option I'm going with,  all we have left is a MAJOR plot hole we were not suppose to notice (which actually might be the truth).       (for a musical reference play the song Glass Onion by The Beatles)

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I never said I agreed with Dargo's take about the folly of youth.     Instead I said she just had enough of a spiritual leader (even the title High Lama makes me want to gag).     This does occur in real life even to those that have listen to a (or their),  spiritual leader for decades (or in this case 18 or so decades!).       

 

 

OH! You mean kind'a like all those celebs we're readin' about lately who finally figure out that L. Ron Hubbard was full of..well...YOU know!!!

 

LOL

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Someone explain the plot of Portrait Of Jennie to me

 

Well, take one part starving artist with a seeming very questionable proclivity for under-aged girls, add one part thirty year-old actress attempting but unsuccessfully to portray the part of an under-aged girl...especially at first anyway, add a dash of the "spirit world" in to this concoction...OOPS, and don't forget to add the kindly old lady who's around to give moral support to all involved...shake well for thirty seconds and...VOILA! You've got "Portrait of Jennie"!!!

 

(...though I do have to say that I've always felt that two Josephs keep this thing watchable...actor Cotten and cinematographer August)

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Well, take one part starving artist with a seeming very questionable proclivity for under-aged girls, add one part thirty year-old actress attempting but unsuccessfully to portray the part of an under-aged girl...especially at first anyway, add a dash of the "spirit world" in to this concoction...OOPS, and don't forget to add the kindly old lady who's around to give moral support to all involved...shake well for thirty seconds and...VOILA! You've got "Portrait of Jennie"!!!

 

(...though I do have to say that I've always felt that two Josephs keep this thing watchable...actor Cotten and cinematographer August)

 

The most unrealistic part of the film was the kindly old lady sticking around to give moral support.   In real life she would have locked her doors and told this psycho to stay away from her.

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The most unrealistic part of the film was the kindly old lady sticking around to give moral support.   In real life she would have locked her doors and told this psycho to stay away from her.

 

Oh now James! Certainly NOT a kindly old lady like Ethel Barrymore!

 

(...say, speakin' of her...did I ever tell you about that time she was on Arthur Godfrey's show???)

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Oh now James! Certainly NOT a kindly old lady like Ethel Barrymore!

 

(...say, speakin' of her...did I ever tell you about that time she was on Arthur Godfrey's show???)

I'd love to hear the story, Dargo.

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Oh now James! Certainly NOT a kindly old lady like Ethel Barrymore!

 

(...say, speakin' of her...did I ever tell you about that time she was on Arthur Godfrey's show???)

Is that the time that Ethel starting calling Godfrey "cupcakes" on the air and he called her "his big widdle girl?"

 

Later Ethel was named as co-respondent in Godfrey's divorce trial.

 

Then again, I could be wrong.

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