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The movie Cabaret was adapted from the hit Broadway stage musical which was adapted from John Van Druten's play I Am A Camera which was adapted from Christopher Isherwood's Berlin Stories

 

During a screening of CABARET at which Christopher Isherwood was in attendance, Isherwood supposedly said out loud during the scene where Liza Minnelli and Michael York (who played the character based on Isherwood) have intimate relations, "I never slept with a woman in my life!"  

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Here's a clip of Liza Minnelli winning the Oscar for Best Actress for Cabaret.

 

 

Is that Desi Arnaz Jr siiting to Liza's left in the audience, the one who kisses her when she's announced as the winner?

I know that her father Vincente Minnelli is siiting to her right.

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Is that Desi Arnaz Jr siiting to Liza's left in the audience, the one who kisses her when she's announced as the winner?

I know that her father Vincente Minnelli is siiting to her right.

 

I never received a response to this question so I researched it on my own and discovered that Liza Minnelli and Desi Arnaz Jr were actually engaged for a time. Lucille Ball encouraged the relationship and was even okay with the two living together.

Lucy did not like (to put it mildly) Desi Jr's prior girlfiend Patty Duke. 

 

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desi_arnaz_jr_2003_06_17.jpg

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I never received a response to this question so I researched it on my own and discovered that Liza Minnelli and Desi Arnaz Jr were actually engaged for a time. Lucille Ball encouraged the relationship and was even okay with the two living together.

Lucy did not like (to put it mildly) Desi Jr's prior girlfiend Patty Duke. 

 

 

 

 

Wow, imagine if Liza Minnelli And Desi Arnaz Jr had a child together.

Having Judy Garland and Lucille Ball for grandmothers seems like a wonderful idea in theory but the reality might not be without some negatives.

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Wow, imagine if Liza Minnelli And Desi Arnaz Jr had a child together.

Having Judy Garland and Lucille Ball for grandmothers seems like a wonderful idea in theory but the reality might not be without some negatives.

It would make for an interesting statue.  Photoshop anyone?

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As the living, breathing encyclopedia on my favorite show biz female, Julie Andrews, I thought I would impart a bit of history regarding her association with CABARET.  While she was the toast of Broadway, her THE BOYFRIEND composer, Sandy Wilson, began adapting I AM A CAMERA into a new musical for her to star.  Hal Prince stepped in to produce, and eagerly went about securing Julie Andrews for the role of Sally.  She was the first choice of Prince and composers for the Broadway show, SHE LOVES ME, and she had agreed to do it, if they would wait for her to complete her initial film commitments.  She was signed to her first three films, which she made in rapid succession.  In fact, all three were in the can, before any were released.  Prince made the decision to not wait, and cast Barbara Cook in SHE LOVES ME.  The show was not a success, and Prince publicly regretted his decision,   Not because he thought Cook wasn't good in the role, but he so loved the show and felt it should have been a hit, and thought that had he waited for Andrews, it would have been.  Wilson continued writing, but Prince thought his material was too light, and asked him to go back and try again.  This went on for a bit, but, ultimately, Prince decided that Wilson was not the man for the show he wanted, and replaced him with Kander and Ebb.  Meanwhile, Julie began her brief stint as the biggest movie star on the planet, and was swamped with movies offers.  Most of which she declined, but, even with the ones she accepted, she became completely unavailable to Broadway and the stage version of CABARET.   There were also Broadway offers of a revival of THE KING AND I and a musical version of MAJOR BARBARA around the same time, neither of which she ever did.  So ingrained in the minds of the creators was Julie Andrews as Sally, they replaced her with another British actress.

 

Neither the Broadway show nor the film are my cup of tea, although I preferred the original show to the film. As much as people tripped over themselves to praise Liza, I found her Sally, completely one-dimensional. The one-dimension is good, and she is certainly at the top of her game in the numbers, but she's just not particularly interesting for an entire film.  Nor am I a fan of Fosse's direction, in any film. Not really that much of a fan of his choreography, either.  Although, I find what he did for CABARET, completely appropriate for his film.  Generally, though, I find him repetitive.  Kind of, if you've seen one Fosse routine, you've seen them all.  I realize that's not exactly true, but, for me, he lacks the versatility of say, Onna White, Michael Kidd or even the choreographer he is cribbing,  Jack Cole.  I'm certainly not bashing him, just saying he, like CABARET, isn't my cup of tea.  Obviously, many do not agree. 

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 So ingrained in the minds of the creators was Julie Andrews as Sally, they replaced her with another British actress.

 

Neither the Broadway show nor the film are my cup of tea, although I preferred the original show to the film. As much as people tripped over themselves to praise Liza, I found her Sally, completely one-dimensional. The one-dimension is good, and she is certainly at the top of her game in the numbers, but she's just not particularly interesting for an entire film.  Nor am I a fan of Fosse's direction, in any film. Not really that much of a fan of his choreography, either.  Although, I find what he did for CABARET, completely appropriate for his film.  Generally, though, I find him repetitive.  Kind of, if you've seen one Fosse routine, you've seen them all.  I realize that's not exactly true, but, for me, he lacks the versatility of say, Onna White, Michael Kidd or even the choreographer he is cribbing,  Jack Cole.  I'm certainly not bashing him, just saying he, like CABARET, isn't my cup of tea.  Obviously, many do not agree. 

johnm001, first let's give the name of "another British actress:" Jill Haworth. I too prefer the stage show to the film. I particularly enjoy the London original cast recording, in which Judi Dench played Sally Bowles. I'm not too much of a Bob Fosse fan either -- and that's considered kind of sacrilegious where I come from. I think I posted in this thread or another, a link to the BBC's recent film, Christopher and His Kind, which is Isherwood's attempt to "set the record straight" about what really happened in Berlin.  It's an incredible program, with a heartbreaking depiction of Jean Ross, the real Sally Bowles. 

 

Btw -- She Loves Me was not a great hit, but as you probably know, it has become a beloved show in the Broadway musical theater canon and is often revived.

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johnm001, first let's give the name of "another British actress:" Jill Haworth. I too prefer the stage show to the film. I particularly enjoy the London original cast recording, in which Judi Dench played Sally Bowles. I'm not too much of a Bob Fosse fan either -- and that's considered kind of sacrilegious where I come from. I think I posted in this thread or another, a link to the BBC's recent film, Christopher and His Kind, which is Isherwood's attempt to "set the record straight" about what really happened in Berlin.  It's an incredible program, with a heartbreaking depiction of Jean Ross, the real Sally Bowles. 

 

Btw -- She Loves Me was not a great hit, but as you probably know, it has become a beloved show in the Broadway musical theater canon and is often revived.

I adore SHE LOVES ME.  In fact, with regard to Julie, it is my Number 1 regret of her career, that she did not do the show, or the proposed film (which was to reunite her with Dick Van Dyke). They are perfect for those roles, but the film version was a casualty of the many Hollywood musical flops.  Although, she had a play or pay clause and was paid $1 million to not do it.  Around the time the film was announced, she made a single of two songs from the score.  By the way, I thought everyone in the Broadway production of CABARET was really good.  It's just that the story leaves me cold, because I dislike all the characters. 

 

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 Around the time the film was announced, she made a single of two songs from the score. 

 

Thank you for that -- it's lovely! A different song with the same title is in one of my all-time favorite Broadway scores (also Bock/Harnick), Tenderloin, where it is sung by Maurice Evans.

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So ingrained in the minds of the creators was Julie Andrews as Sally, they replaced her with another British actress.

 

 

 

Sally Bowles is British (specifically English) in Isherwood's story and in I Am A Camera.

One of the reasons Liza Minnelli was supposedly rejected for the role of Sally in the stage musical Cabaret was she was too American. Of course, in the movie Sally IS American.

 

Ishwerwood's Sally and the Sally of the original stage production of Cabaret is a not-so-good singer with delusions about her talent.

This of course is not the case with Sally as played by Liza Minnelli and would not have been the case had Julie Andrews played the role.

 

I am a big fan of both Liza Minnelli and Julie Andrews.

Ultimately I am glad Liza was Sally Bowles in the movie Cabaret.

And I am glad Julie Andrews made Victor/Victoria.

 

 Thank you very much for posting that clip of Julie Andrews singing "Dear Friend."

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Sally Bowles is British (specifically English) in Isherwood's story and in I Am A Camera.

One of the reasons Liza Minnelli was supposedly rejected for the role of Sally in the stage musical Cabaret was she was too American. Of course, in the movie Sally IS American.

 

Ishwerwood's Sally and the Sally of the original stage production of Cabaret is a not-so-good singer with delusions about her talent.

This of course is not the case with Sally as played by Liza Minnelli and would not have been the case had Julie Andrews played the role.

 

 

Sam Mendes's wonderful revival of CABARET again presented Sally Bowles as a mediocre English singer, played in London by Jane Horrocks and on Broadway by Natasha Richardson. 

 

 

 

Jane Horrocks is brilliant in the role and is in fact a good singer as evidenced by her work in LITTLE VOICE. 

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Haven't some believed that Sean Astin was the love child of Patty Duke and Desi Arnaz, Junior?

 

There does seem to be some resemblance.

 

But then there was also a rumor that John Kerr was the illegitimate son of Franchot Tone too.

 

Never mind.

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Sam Mendes's wonderful revival of CABARET again presented Sally Bowles as a mediocre English singer, played in London by Jane Horrocks and on Broadway by Natasha Richardson. 

 

I saw that production at the Donmar in London -- it was great.  Horrocks was excellent, and the show basically introduced Alan **** to the world. I liked him a lot then, but I've begun to find him pretty tedious.

 

I'm sorry I didn't go to Cabaret in NY when Natasha Richardson played Sally. I had the pleasure to work with her a few years after that -- one of the sweetest people I ever worked with. What a tragedy her passing was!

 

 

(ROFL -- Alan C u m m i n g's surname is censored!)

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BagelOnAPlateOfOnionRolls--Jill Haworth did a fine job in the role of Sally Bowles in the Broadway original cast of "Cabaret", especially the title song.  I have the compact disc--If you can find Haworths' version of Cabaret on YouTube, listen to it.  It's worth searching out.

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Haven't some believed that Sean Astin was the love child of Patty Duke and Desi Arnaz, Junior?

 

There does seem to be some resemblance.

 

But then there was also a rumor that John Kerr was the illegitimate son of Franchot Tone too.

 

Never mind.

Even Patty Duke thought it, and so did Desi.  He and Sean Astin have a very close relationship.  It was years later that a paternity test disclosed the father to be Michael Tell, who was married to Patty for 13 days, during one of her manic episodes.  Sean Astin enjoys a relationship with John Astin, Michael Tell, Desi Arnaz, Jr. and Michael Pearce, Patty's current husband.

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The one thing I dislike about this film is that they did not eliminate all the anachronisms. And in spirit it seems like something from the 70s, not the period in which it was set.

Anachronisms? What anachronisms?! I think Fosse's version is brilliant - start to finish. Fosse wisly keeps all the musicalnumbers in the cabaret, though all comment on theoffstage drama. Aside from the stunning finish to the Sam Mendes revival (Alan Cumming - awesome!), there is no need to remake it. A Sally Bowles who could sing and loved performing may not be Isherwood's Sally, but is a perfectly valid altenative. Do we really want to watch a film version wherein an untalented singer is on display in multiple musical numbers? If that approach HAD been taken, how many myriad of complaints would there have been that whiever played Sally was awful! Fosse perfectly captures the ambience of that time and place. The film deserved its Oscars and remains one of Holytwood's greatest musicals.

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Anachronisms? What anachronisms?! I think Fosse's version is brilliant - start to finish. Fosse wisly keeps all the musicalnumbers in the cabaret, though all comment on theoffstage drama. Aside from the stunning finish to the Sam Mendes revival (Alan Cumming - awesome!), there is no need to remake it. A Sally Bowles who could sing and loved performing may not be Isherwood's Sally, but is a perfectly valid altenative. Do we really want to watch a film version wherein an untalented singer is on display in multiple musical numbers? If that approach HAD been taken, how many myriad of complaints would there have been that whiever played Sally was awful! Fosse perfectly captures the ambience of that time and place. The film deserved its Oscars and remains one of Holytwood's greatest musicals.

While I don't think it comes anywhere near a great musical, since the film completely eliminates the entire concept of what a musical, as a form of storytelling, is, I do agree about Sally being a good singer.  The idea of sitting through a "musical" and listening to a mediocre singer is, the absolute last thing I would want to do.  A good singer who is happens to sing in that dive, is perfectly believable and legitimate.  Many, many great singers, have sung and continue to sing, in dives.

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While I don't think it comes anywhere near a great musical, since the film completely eliminates the entire concept of what a musical, as a form of storytelling

 

I couldn't disagree more. One reason Cabaret is a great film musical is that it breaks ground in the WAY its musical numbers comment on the goings on offstage, while working entirely well in the context of the seedy Kit Kat Club. Fosse doesn't have Cliff ( or whatever York's characters is called in the movie version) singing to Sally back in their shabby room. The landlady diesn't sing about her past or have duets with her Jewish boyfriend. (as in the stage version) Would you have thought it "great" if these characters burst into song suddenly as say gang members do in West Side Story? Songs such as "Money", "Two Ladies" "Maybe This Time" "If You Could See Her" the title number!, etc. etc, are commenting DIRECTLY on the dramatic scenes, help advance the storyline and do all the "storytelling" your concept of a great musical seems to require. (I don't necessarily agree with that requirement anyway) ) At the same time this dark " musical" details the imminent horror of the rise of Nazism. The hills aren't alive with the sound of music but I think Cabaret is a 'stunning musical - brilliantly conceived" as one critic put it at the time.

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While I don't think it comes anywhere near a great musical, since the film completely eliminates the entire concept of what a musical, as a form of storytelling

 

I couldn't disagree more. One reason Cabaret is a great film musical is that it breaks ground in the WAY its musical numbers comment on the goings on offstage, while working entirely well in the context of the seedy Kit Kat Club. Fosse doesn't have Cliff ( or whatever York's characters is called in the movie version) singing to Sally back in their shabby room. The landlady diesn't sing about her past or have duets with her Jewish boyfriend. (as in the stage version) Would you have thought it "great" if these characters burst into song suddenly as say gang members do in West Side Story? Songs such as "Money", "Two Ladies" "Maybe This Time" "If You Could See Her" the title number!, etc. etc, are commenting DIRECTLY on the dramatic scenes, help advance the storyline and do all the "storytelling" your concept of a great musical seems to require. (I don't necessarily agree with that requirement anyway) ) At the same time this dark " musical" details the imminent horror of the rise of Nazism. The hills aren't alive with the sound of music but I think Cabaret is a 'stunning musical - brilliantly conceived" as one critic put it at the time.

I don't understand the defensive nature of your post. I already posted that neither the show nor the film is a favorite of mine, because it contains no characters I like.  I have to like someone, to enjoy a movie, play or book.  Otherwise, I see the time invested, as wasted.  I don't view the film version of CABARET as a musical.  It's a drama where characters in the film are entertainers.  A musical, to my way of thinking, is an art form where song and dance serve to advance the story.  If you don't like people bursting into song, then you don't like musicals.  That's the art form of a musical.  Taking a musical and turning into a drama with music, doesn't make for a great musical.  It might make for a great drama.  That was my only point about my disagreement of CABARET being a great film musical.  Keeping the art form, and improving upon it for the medium of film is different than ignoring the art form for film, which is what CABARET does.  I didn't say someone else shouldn't like it. I said I didn't like it, and why I didn't.  It's not a great musical, to me. It wasn't a great musical to me, when I saw it on Broadway, presented in the proper art from.   If you think WEST SIDE STORY (which is a great musical, to me), isn't, then so be it.  You're entitled to not think so.   I really don't care what a critic of the time called CABARET.  That has no bearing, whatsoever, on my opinion of the film.  I could post, myriad, raves about WEST SIDE STORY, as well, but who cares? 

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During a screening of CABARET at which Christopher Isherwood was in attendance, Isherwood supposedly said out loud during the scene where Liza Minnelli and Michael York (who played the character based on Isherwood) have intimate relations, "I never slept with a woman in my life!"

 

I wonder if waspish Isherwood made a similar comment when (if) he saw the musical on Broadway, as the same sceanario occurs there. So therefore he shouldn't have been remotely surprised by the film version and I'm sure he was not. In fact, "his" character's "bisexuality" raised eyebrows at the time.i

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I wonder if waspish Isherwood made a similar comment when (if) he saw the musical on Broadway, as the same sceanario occurs there. So therefore he shouldn't have been remotely surprised by the film version and I'm sure he was not. In fact, "his" character's "bisexuality" raised eyebrows at the time.i

 

Isherwood's out loud remark at the screening of CABARET was surely not an expression of surprise that the scene was in the film, just a comment that he wanted to make sure was heard.

 

I don't know if Isherwood ever attended a stage production. On stage the Isherwood-based chartacter was American Cliff Bradshaw. In the movie he was English Brian Roberts.

In the original stage production (I may be wrong about this)  I don't think Cliff was gay or bisexual (at least not explicitly) just as the Isherwood character was not explicitly gay in I AM A CAMERA.

Brian Roberts in the movie was gay (or perhaps bisexual --- although I think his experience with Sally was more of a fluke than anything), and in Sam Mendes's stage revival of CABARET Cliff Bradshaw was explicitly gay (or bisexual). Mendes's revival also added Kit Kat Boys. In one scene Cliff Bradhaw kisses one of them.

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