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If he never saw the stage version (which, by the way, I don't believe for a second), how does he know that the director threw out its book and made a film film more based on the original stories?  He went through life basing his opinion of what "friends" told him?!  What a moron.

I don't want to seem insensitive or shallow, but I can't spend two or so hours looking at Liza Minelli, especially in garish makeup.

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Cabaret airs tonight (June 30) on TCM as part this month's Stage To Screen spotlight.

 

The only cast member from the original Broadway production to appear in Bob Fosse's movie was Joel Grey, who reprised his role as the M.C.

Fosse originally did not want anyone who'd appeared in the play to be his movie since he wanted to bring his own interpretation to the screen without any preconceived notions from the actors.

However, the movie's producers wanted Joel Grey and told Fosse that if it came down to a choice between him and Joel Grey, they would chose Joel Grey.  

 

I mentioned this in the I JUST WATCHED thread, but I'll say it too.

 

I've seen the film before a few times, but for the first time last night I was genuinely chilled and terrified by the TOMORROW BELONGS TO ME scene.

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I love the film version of "Cabaret", but that version is hardly faithful to the original material.

 

The most glaring difference - Natalia Landauer escaped to France, studied art there and married a doctor. 

 

And the young man who pursued her was not a Jew.

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I love the film version of "Cabaret", but that version is hardly faithful to the original material.

 

The most glaring difference - Natalia Landauer escaped to France, studied art there and married a doctor. 

 

And the young man who pursued her was not a Jew.

 

Yes, the changes to Natalia Landauer's story were made for the play I AM A CAMERA, which was adapted from Christopher Isherwood's BERLIN STORIES. The film version of CABARET used this version of Natalia's story. Natalia does not appear at all in the stage musical CABARET.

 

The movie CABARET offers the most authentic portrayal of the character based on Christopher Isherwood, having the Brian Roberts character (played by Michael York) be both English and gay. (You can make that argument that Brian is bisexual, but I see his "affair" with Sally as a fluke. Having sex with a woman does not make a gay man bisexual.)

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I don't want to seem insensitive or shallow, but I can't spend two or so hours looking at Liza Minelli, especially in garish makeup.

 

 

LOL!

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Yes, the changes to Natalia Landauer's story were made for the play I AM A CAMERA, which was adapted from Christopher Isherwood's BERLIN STORIES. The film version of CABARET used this version of Natalia's story. Natalia does not appear at all in the stage musical CABARET.

 

The movie CABARET offers the most authentic portrayal of the character based on Christopher Isherwood, having the Brian Roberts character (played by Michael York) be both English and gay. (You can make that argument that Brian is bisexual, but I see his "affair" with Sally as a fluke. Having sex with a woman does not make a gay man bisexual.)

Yes, HoldenIsHere, in the "Berlin Stories", the Christopher Isherwood character, who is named Brian Roberts in the film, is obviously a gay man.

 

And, if I remember correctly, the character, who is nameless in the original material, DID NOT HAVE AN AFFAIR with Sally Bowles.

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The film's most memorable exchange -

 

Brian (Very angry): "Screw Maximilian!"

 

Sally: "I do."

 

Brian: (Without thinking) "So do I."

 

For a film that was made in 1972, this exchange between Brian and Sally was a startling piece of exposition.

 

And the 70's began to explore the fact that a man could also want another man - a "taboo topic" for so long.

 

It was most memorably explored in an Italian film with Helmut Berger - "Un Beau Monstre" - in which he decided to torment his beautiful wife, Virna Lisi, by introducing his boyfriend into their marriage. 

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The film's most memorable exchange -

 

Brian (Very angry): "Screw Maximilian!"

 

Sally: "I do."

 

Brian: (Without thinking) "So do I."

 

......

 

I don't agree that he says this "without thinking". In fact, there's a noticeable pause before he replies, and when he does, his voice is filled with significance. I think this is a key scene in the film, the one in which Brian decides to directly tell Sally that he's bisexual.

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I don't agree that he says this "without thinking". In fact, there's a noticeable pause before he replies, and when he does, his voice is filled with significance. I think this is a key scene in the film, the one in which Brian decides to directly tell Sally that he's bisexual.

 

You can definitely tell that Brian has decided to tell Sally that he has also been "screwing" (to use the movie's terminology) Maximillian.

 

When you say that "Brian decides to directly tell Sally that he's bisexual" the "he" you mean is Maximillian, correct?

Sally already knows that Brian has been involved primarily with men in he past.  Sally in fact was the only female with whom Brian has been able to, um, close the deal.

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In Christopher and His Kind, the biography that Isherwood wrote to correct the record re: the too-coy Cabaret, he makes it very clear: "I went to Berlin because of the boys." The dramatization with Matt Smith is on YouTube, and it's brilliant.

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In the original material - that is,  the "Berlin Stories" - "Brian" or rather the narrator is definitely NOT a bisexual.

 

He is definitely a gay man - it's in everything that he thinks and says.

 

Also, in the memorable performance that Michal York gave in the film, "Brian" could never be seen as a bisexual man.

 

HE IS A GAY MAN.

 

The film is only teasing us with the thought that "Brian" could - maybe - go to bed with women, too.

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You can definitely tell that Brian has decided to tell Sally that he has also been "screwing" (to use the movie's terminology) Maximillian.

 

When you say that "Brian decides to directly tell Sally that he's bisexual" the "he" you mean is Maximillian, correct?

Sally already knows that Brian has been involved primarily with men in he past.  Sally in fact was the only female with whom Brian has been able to, um, close the deal.

 

  I meant Brian. I wasn't sure whether to say "bisexual" or "gay". I wanted to say "gay", but since Brian was having an, uh, "successful" affair with Sally, I figured he must kind of sort of sometimes like women too.

 

But yes, upon reflection, Brian was pretty much gay. Sally was, as you say, an exception.  (and after all, she practically forced herself on him...at least at first.)

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The Baron, who is played so brilliantly by Helmut Griem, is obviously "a bisexual man".

 

He wanted both Sally and Brian.

 

And, when he managed to get both of them, he walked away.

 

Was he afraid that the relationship would get "too complicated"?

 

In the "Berlin Stories", this character is an Englishman.

 

Cabaret-Liza-Minnelli-Helmut-Griem-Micha

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  • 7 months later...

Cabaret airs tonight (February 4) at 1:30 AM Eastern as part of TCM's 31 Days of Oscar.

 

This year the 31 Days of Oscar movies are airing alphabetically so Cabaret is airing between Bullitt and Cabin In The Sky.

 

The movie won 8 Academy Awards:

 

Best Director (Bob Fosse)

Best Actress in a Leading Role (Liza Minnelli)

Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Joel Grey)

Best Cinematography (Geoffrey Unsworth)

Best Film Editing (David Bretherton)

Best Original Song Score or Adaptation Score (Ralph Burns)

Best Art Direction (Rolf Zehetbauer, Hans Jürgen Kiebach and Herbert Strabel)

Best Sound (Robert Knudson and David Hildyard)

 

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Cabarat8AcademyAwardsFB.jpg

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Has Michael York ever been nominated for an Oscar?

 

When CABARET aired last week, I tuned in where Brian (Michael York) first meets Sally Bowles and she tells him about the other boarders at the boarding house,

Sally's comment about the streetwalker Fraulein Kost's fortune ("You will meet a strange man") always makes me smile.

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  • 1 year later...
On 7/2/2016 at 5:42 PM, misswonderly3 said:

since Brian was having an, uh, "successful" affair with Sally, I figured he must kind of sort of sometimes like women too.

Only because Sally looked like a man in drag with that crazy make-up. 😎

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