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On 5/18/2015 at 1:30 PM, TopBilled said:

The one thing I dislike about this film is that they did not eliminate all the anachronisms. And in spirit it seems like something from the 70s, not the period in which it was set.

How many musicals actually reflect the actual times?  I think this film accurately captures the spirit of the times in Germany preceding WWII when the Nazi's were capturing power and people just really didn't see what was coming or how fast.  The end of the film Cabaret displays a Nazi audience at the Cabaret showing the nightmarish future.

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On 5/18/2015 at 1:30 PM, TopBilled said:

The one thing I dislike about this film is that they did not eliminate all the anachronisms. And in spirit it seems like something from the 70s, not the period in which it was set.

Sorry for digging up a six-year-old post in this resurrected thread. What are some of the anachronisms in the movie? Unsure I've noticed any.

I agree the film has its share of the paranoia and cynicism that place it among its '70s contemporaries. But I feel like it very authentically recreates the era of its setting.

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13 hours ago, Toto said:

How many musicals actually reflect the actual times?  I think this film accurately captures the spirit of the times in Germany preceding WWII when the Nazi's were capturing power and people just really didn't see what was coming or how fast.  The end of the film Cabaret displays a Nazi audience at the Cabaret showing the nightmarish future.

For sure, since this flick was made about an era before any of our times, we have to research if there really were cabarets of that sort with that kind of entertainment anywhere in Germany( or anywhere else) .  And I'd say any musicals created that have books intended to reflect the times they were made in do so accurately.   But musicals intended to offer tales of earlier times might or might not, depending on how good the research was.   And I too, thought CABARET did a fine job of it.

Sepiatone

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On 2/4/2017 at 6:31 PM, BagelOnAPlateOfOnionRolls said:

Cabaret airs tonight (February 4) at 1:30 AM Eastern as part of TCM's 31 Days of Oscar.

 

This year the 31 Days of Oscar movies are airing alphabetically so Cabaret is airing between Bullitt and Cabin In The Sky.

 

The movie won 8 Academy Awards:

 

Best Director (Bob Fosse)

Best Actress in a Leading Role (Liza Minnelli)

Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Joel Grey)

Best Cinematography (Geoffrey Unsworth)

Best Film Editing (David Bretherton)

Best Original Song Score or Adaptation Score (Ralph Burns)

Best Art Direction (Rolf Zehetbauer, Hans Jürgen Kiebach and Herbert Strabel)

Best Sound (Robert Knudson and David Hildyard)

 

http://darkroom-cdn.s3.amazonaws.com/2015/02/AP7303270636_66-365x540.jpg

96ed4376777af3f79aab66e5253f8180.jpg

http://verdonfosse.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Cabarat8AcademyAwardsFB.jpg

If I were a voting member of the Academy, I would have added Best Picture.  Yes, over The Godfather! 

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13 hours ago, Swithin said:

Here is a production that I am looking forward to, the early word from London is good:

Odd that he just said in an interview that The Danish Girl was a mistake and immediately follow that comment up with this dive back into gender-bending territory.

Th wearing of the bow tie while shirtless was done by the Isherwood character in the movie, not the Emcee, but it's a visual image evocative of the movie, certainly. I've never seen any of the stage productions. Is this an image that drifts from production to production, if anyone with enough knowledge of the history of the various stagings knows?

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3 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Odd that he just said in an interview that The Danish Girl was a mistake and immediately follow that comment up with this dive back into gender-bending territory.

Th wearing of the bow tie while shirtless was done by the Isherwood character in the movie, not the Emcee, but it's a visual image evocative of the movie, certainly. I've never seen any of the stage productions. Is this an image that drifts from production to production, if anyone with enough knowledge of the history of the various stagings knows?

The Emcee's costume has varied from one production to another.  Joel Grey's costume in the original stage production was similar to what you see in the film - tux with tails in most scenes.  The 1998 revival on Broadway is edgier - I guess the team decided by the 1990s mainstream audiences could handle more than the ladies coming into town from the suburbs of the 1960s.  Since then, many productions have had variations on the 1998 revival...

Playbill has a gallery of various emcees through the years....

 

https://playbill.com/multimedia/gallery/photo-exclusive-from-joel-to-alan-to-ral-to-nph-looking-back-at-the-many-my-323786/?slide=0

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8 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

The Emcee's costume has varied from one production to another.  

The Emcee's role has evolved as well. Originally conceived as a supporting role, it was expanded during rehearsals. Joe Masteroff (who wrote the book for the musical) has said that Boris Aronson's wonderful sets, for which he won a Tony, were quite elaborate and needed time to get into place. So Joel Grey's role was expanded to give the sets extra time. "Give Joel something to do," was Masteroff's memory of how to deal with some of the set changes.

 

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 Unless overlooked, neither Gene Kelly's said praise of film nor drop on one of the Bohemian Corporal's 'favorite' deviant artists, Otto Dix, have yet to be mentioned in this thread??

                                                                                                      Cabaret-1976-Otto-Dix-Portrait-Sylvia-von-%2BHarden-1926%2B%25282%2529.jpg

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On 5/17/2015 at 3:02 PM, markfp2 said:

Re: "The second time I saw it was in the company of a young German woman who had been spending the summer here. I told her to pick the movie and she chose CABARET. It was a big deal for her because the film had been banned in Germany. Not because the censors were offended by the sex, but because, at that time, movies about Nazis were prohibited."

 That's a cool anecdote to the film for you.

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10 hours ago, Shank Asu said:

Think this is one i'd like to see get remade.

Well, they remade West Side Story, so who knows? I checked out imdb just in case, and it doesn't look like there have been any. There was a 1993 BBC airing that  was just a filmed presentation of a stage show with Alan Cumming. His outfit and pose on the accompanying promotional pic is remarkably similar to the Eddie Redmayne pic above.

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5 hours ago, NoShear said:

 That's a cool anecdote to the film for you.

It is odd, though--I saw "Cabaret" on German Tv in either 1975 or 76. I also had a friend who had seen it in Munich before that airing.

It's true that anything positive about the Nazis (Triumph of the Will) was not allowed in Germany for a while, but I don't think this title was one of the withheld titles.  

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We had a German exchange student my senior year of high school A friend of mine and I were big into war games at the time, and we got him to play a WWII game with us. He said, "Okay, but in this scenario, it's just US vs. Germany. There's no Hitler or Holocaust, all right?" And my friend and I kind of looked at each other and said, "Ummm ... sure." And we all had fun after that. This was the late '80s.

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19 hours ago, NoShear said:

 Unless overlooked, neither Gene Kelly's said praise of film nor drop on one of the Bohemian Corporal's 'favorite' deviant artists, Otto Dix, have yet to be mentioned in this thread??

                                                                                                      Cabaret-1976-Otto-Dix-Portrait-Sylvia-von-%2BHarden-1926%2B%25282%2529.jpg

 mr6666 - Gene Kelly, who's said to have been originally offered director for CABARET (1972), apparently gave Bob Fosse's meisterwerk notable praise.  Otto Dix, who was branded degenerate during the German Reich period, was tapped as the 'art director' for the Kit Kat Klub patron ambience.

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14 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

Well, they remade West Side Story, so who knows? I checked out imdb just in case, and it doesn't look like there have been any. There was a 1993 BBC airing that  was just a filmed presentation of a stage show with Alan Cumming. His outfit and pose on the accompanying promotional pic is remarkably similar to the Eddie Redmayne pic above.

Yeah, after i wrote the post i started thinking there must actually be other versions of Cabaret.  I just know that the book it's based on, Goodbye to Berlin, the male protaganist is gay, and just like in Breakfast at Tiffany's, it gets ignored in the film, so the film versions aren't the actual stories intended by the authors (although i understand Cabaret is a loose musical  interpretation).

West Side Story IMO absolutely does not need to be remade.  It's a Spielberg vanity project.  I would prefer the bad classics get remade so they can be improved upon.

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1 hour ago, Shank Asu said:

Yeah, after i wrote the post i started thinking there must actually be other versions of Cabaret.  I just know that the book it's based on, Goodbye to Berlin, the male protaganist is gay, and just like in Breakfast at Tiffany's, it gets ignored in the film, so the film versions aren't the actual stories intended by the authors (although i understand Cabaret is a loose musical  interpretation).

West Side Story IMO absolutely does not need to be remade.  It's a Spielberg vanity project.  I would prefer the made classics get remade so they can be improved upon.

I posted this a while back, but it may interest you. The BBC presented a brilliant film a few years ago: Christopher and His Kind. Since Cabaret had become so famous, Isherwood wrote Christopher and His Kind in 1976, "to set the record straight about Berlin." The BBC dramatized it in 2011.

Here's the trailer:

 

 

 

 

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On 5/17/2015 at 10:59 AM, BagelOnAPlateOfOnionRolls said:

Airing tonight on TCM at 8:00 PM Eastern is Bob Fosse's divinely decadent Cabaret starring the one and only Liza Minnelli with songs by John Kander and Fred Ebb.

 

This movie was Fosse's fiollow up film to Sweet Charity, which was a huge box office flop.

I saw Sweet Charity when it appeared as part of the Friday Spotlight on Road Show Musicals and I think it was a wonderful movie, but I digress . . .

 

The movie Cabaret was adapted from the hit Broadway stage musical which was adapted from John Van Druten's play I Am A Camera which was adapted from Christopher Isherwood's Berlin Stories, in particular the one called "Sally Bowles." I Am A Camera focused on English night club peformer Sally Bowles in Weimar Berlin with a subplot about a gigolo wooing a wealthly Jewish girl. The stage musical Cabaret replaced the gigolo subplot with one about a romance between Sally's gentile landlady and a Jewish grocer. The movie Cabaret restored the subplot  about the gigolo and the Jewish heiress with the role of Sally's landlady greatly reduced.

 

Bob Fosse's concept of the musical was for the songs to be sung only in the context of a performance, with no characters bursting into song during a scene. As a result all of the songs from the stage musical that were "sung dialogue" were eliminated. The songs in the movie, except for one, were all performed in the Kit Kat Club where Sally Bowles works. Supposedly Fosse at one point wanted to cut the "Tomorrow Belongs To Me" number sung by the German youth in the beer garden because he thought all the songs in the movie should be sung inside the cabaret. Happily he decided to keep this song in his final cut of the film. The song works wonderfully to show the rise of Nazism and the scene where it is sung is quite chilling.

 

There are not enough superlatives for Liza Minnelli's performance in this movie. In the original stage play Sally Bowles was a mediocre singer whose illusions of being "discovered" were comically pathethic. Liza Minnelli's Sally, on the other hand, is a bravura singer and dancer. The idea here is that while Sally is a great talent she's an emotional and psychological wreck. The movie version added three songs by Kander and Ebb for Liza that were not in the stage production: "Mein Herr," "Money" (a duet with Joel Grey, who recreated his stage role as the club's M.C.) and "Maybe This Time" (a song that Liza had first recorded on her debut studio album Liza! Liza! released in 1964 and again on her New Feelin' album released in 1970).

Liza's Sally is also American. Liza had auditioned for the role in the stage musical. One of the reasons she supposedly was rejected was because the character was English. In interviews Liza has commented that she was not even asked if she could do any kind of an English accent.

 

After a screening of Cabaret, Vincente Minnelli (Liza's father) told Bob Fosse that he had made a perfect movie.

I completely agree!

 

 

Life is a cabaret, old chum.

Come to the cabaret.

Thank you for your thoughtful post about "Cabaret".  The information you shared about the background of this film is really interesting.  I have to agree with your feelings about this amazing film and the extraordinary performance of Liza Minelli.  She has an incredible singing voice (just like her mother Judy Garland).  Minelli conveys such authentic emotion in her songs and her acting.  When she sings "Maybe This Time", I can't help but thinking of Judy Garland singing "The Man That Got Away" in "A Star is Born".

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22 hours ago, Swithin said:

I posted this a while back, but it may interest you. The BBC presented a brilliant film a few years ago: Christopher and His Kind. Since Cabaret had become so famous, Isherwood wrote Christopher and His Kind in 1976, "to set the record straight about Berlin." The BBC dramatized it in 2011.

Here's the trailer:

 

 

 

 

Thanks for sharing!

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3 hours ago, filmnoirguy said:

The Community Theater in Schitt's Creek presented their own version of Cabaret.  I watched it again last night.  LOL

 

2 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

That's a wonderful show, and a stunning performance of "Maybe This Time"

APOLOGIES FOR ANY ADS THAT MAY PLAY FIRST.

 

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