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Your Movie Bucket List


Bogie56
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I started keeping a diary of all of the films that I have seen when I was 12.  So, I guess that makes me a list person.

My diary does serve to jog my memory.  "Geez, last saw this one in 1982" sort of thing.  Then i remember girlfriends, dates, etc.

 

Anyway, to the topic at hand. I also started keeping a list of films that I was dearly hoping to catch up with anytime soon.  For a long time The Affairs of Cellini (1934) was on that list.  It finally got crossed off a few years back and I was very happy that it met expectations.  Frank Morgan, Fredric March, Constance Bennett and especially Fay Wray were all wonderful in it.

 

Somewhere near the top of my remaining films is Marcel Pagnol's 1937 Regain or Harvest as it is referred to in English.  It won the New York Film Critics' Foreign Film Award in 1939.  So it must have shown over here with subtitles at some point.

 

Gaumont has released a lot of titles from the French Golden Age on dvd but unfortunately they do not come with English subtitles.  So, I am still on the hunt for Harvest.

 

Another film high up on the bucket list is Gordon Douglas' 1951 Come Fill the Cup with James Cagney.  Gig Young received an Academy Award nomination for this film.  I believe it was on TCM many years ago but it isn't available on dvd to my knowledge.  It was released by Warners Bros. so I'm not sure why it is now so hard to obtain.  Anyway, I'm always on the hunt for another Cagney that I have yet to see.

 

The one good thing about being a younger viewer is that you probably have so many good films ahead of you.  I caught my last unseen Marx Brothers film at a Revue cinema in the 70's.  Somewhere in the middle of it and amongst all the laughter I got a bit sad as I realized that this was the last fresh one for me.  I had now seen all of them.

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Thanks to the wonders of TCM, YouTube, and other miracles of modern technology my personal never-seen list has shrunken considerably in the last couple of decades. But there are still a few I've never caught up with:

 

Quick Millions (1933)

 

Monsieur Vincent (1947) -- when I was a very wee laddie I read an interview with Vincent Price where he cited this as his favorite film. I've wanted to see it ever since.

 

The League of Frightened Men (1937) -- A year or so ago I was finally able to see Meet Nero Wolfe, the first of Columbia's pair of films about Rex Stout's rotund detective. However of this second and last (with Walter Connolly), I've only seen a brief clip. Many Wolfe fans consider the 1977 TV movie with Thayer David (an adaptation of The Doorbell Rang) to be the best ever film depiction of NW, but I've only seen a brief clip of that one as well.

 

And of course there are probably dozens of live TV dramas from the '50s I would like to see, some of which exist (Jack Palance as The Last Tycoon), some may (A Night To Remember, directed by George Roy Hill; Robert Ryan as The Great Gatsby), some probably don't (Gore Vidal's Visit To A Small Planet with Cyril Ritchard and The Death of Billy The Kid aka The Left Handed Gun with Paul Newman). But who dreamed the TV original of 12 Angry Men would be unearthed after half a century? So there is always something to look  forward to.

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Monsieur Vincent (1947) -- when I was a very wee laddie I read an interview with Vincent Price where he cited this as his favorite film. I've wanted to see it ever since.

 

Richard, I managed to catch Monsieur Vincent last fall and thought it was very good.  Pierre Fresnay is great as is Gabrielle Dorziat.  She doesn't have a very big part but she stands out in the film.

A few weeks ago I saw Robert Siodmak's Mollenard (1938) aka Hatred at the BFI in London.  Gabrielle Dorziat plays Harry Baur's wife in it and she is amazing.

I'm a big fan of French films but they are so hard to find with English subtitles.  So when they come up in these one-off Cinematheque screenings I have to make an effort to see them.

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My Orson Welles bucket list includes the highly anticipated release later this year of The Other Side of the Wind starring John Huston and a host of actors who are now deceased.

It had almost been considered a lost film as its rights were so convolutedly tied up it seemed that no one would ever get access to it to finish it.  Apparently those hurdles have been cleared and one of its stars, director Peter Bogdanovich is supervising its completion.

 

The other Welles film that I would dearly love to see but probably never will is a fully restored Magnificent Ambersons.  As we all know this film was taken over by RKO when Welles was in Brazil making It's All True and it was reshot and recut under the supervision of its editor, Robert Wise.  Welles never forgave Wise for doing this.

There is a facsimile of the original ending in one of Jonathan Rosenblum's books on Welles with still photographs and a transcription of the dialogue.  Welles' version certainly wasn't that flat, happy ending that we have now.

I believe It's All True may have recounted the tale of Welles having a work copy of Ambersons shipped down to him in Rio so that he could shadow edit the film and send notes to Wise.  

In a happy ending world it would be great if that work copy turned up in some Rio laboratory vault one day and then someone could piece together the film as Welles intended.  I wonder if any film detective has thought to check out that angle?

I read once that RKO had the original negative for Ambersons sunk off the coast of California somewhere.  Sounds dramatic if it's true.

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My Orson Welles bucket list includes the highly anticipated release later this year of The Other Side of the Wind starring John Huston and a host of actors who are now deceased.

It had almost been considered a lost film as its rights were so convolutedly tied up it seemed that no one would ever get access to it to finish it.  Apparently those hurdles have been cleared and one of its stars, director Peter Bogdanovich is supervising its completion.

 

 

I got to see one of my bucket list movies very recently when TCM aired Oson Welles's CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT.  

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My bucket list would fill many pages if I listed all the titles, so I'll condense it.  The reason there aren't many Hollywood movies on the list is simply because TCM / Netflix / FMC have been doing such a good job of already filling it.

 

Any movie in the Criterion Collection that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie in the Kino Collection that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie directed by Akiro Kurosawa that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie directed by Yasujirō Ozu that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie directed by Eric Rohmer that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie directed by Fritz Lang that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie with Jean Gabin in it that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie with Toshiro Mifune in it that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie with Barbara Stanwyck in it that I haven't yet seen. (There aren't many of those.)

 

Any movie with Lon Chaney in it that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie with Clara Bow in it that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie with Louise Brooks in it that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any independent studio B-movie noir that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any major studio noir that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any Japanese noir or gangster movie that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any Italian neo-realist movie that I haven't yet seen.

 

That'll probably keep me going till I'm about 150, assuming that science will have figured out how to extend human life well before that.

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My bucket list would fill many pages if I listed all the titles, so I'll condense it.  The reason there aren't many Hollywood movies on the list is simply because TCM / Netflix / FMC have been doing such a good job of already filling it.

 

Any movie in the Criterion Collection that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie in the Kino Collection that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie directed by Akiro Kurosawa that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie directed by Yasujirō Ozu that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie directed by Eric Rohmer that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie directed by Fritz Lang that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie with Jean Gabin in it that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie with Toshiro Mifune in it that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie with Barbara Stanwyck in it that I haven't yet seen. (There aren't many of those.)

 

Any movie with Lon Chaney in it that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie with Clara Bow in it that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any movie with Louise Brooks in it that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any independent studio B-movie noir that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any major studio noir that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any Japanese noir or gangster movie that I haven't yet seen.

 

Any Italian neo-realist movie that I haven't yet seen.

 

That'll probably keep me going till I'm about 150, assuming that science will have figured out how to extend human life well before that.

I'm lovin' it.

My list would keep me going to 150 as well.  When I come across a title with some sort of recommendation I usually make note of it.

For instance, I'm still on the lookout for these Jean Gabin's:

 

37 Lady Killer/Gueule D’Amour (Jean Gabin) Jean Gremillon

 

41 Remorques/Stormy Waters (Jean Gabin) Jean Gremillon

 

49 The Walls of Malapaga/Au-Dela des Grilles (Isa Miranda & Jean Gabin) Rene Clement

 

51 La Nuit est Mon Royaume (Jean Gabin)

 

54 The Air of Paris (Jean Gabin)

 

55 Razzia Sur La Chnouf/Chnouf (Jean Gabin) Henri Decon

 

56 Deadlier than the Male (Jean Gabin) Julien Duvivier

 

56 Des Gens Sans Importance (Jean Gabin) Henri Verneuil

 

56 Pig Across Paris/La Traverse de Paris (Jean Gabin, Bourvil) Claude Autant-Lara

 

58 Maigret Sets a Trap/Inspector Maigret/Woman-Bait (Jean Gabin) Jean Delannoy

 

58 The Possessors (Jean Gabin) Denys De La Patelliere

 

59 The Magnificent Tramp/Archimede le Clochard (Jean Gabin)

 

63 Any Number Can Win/The Big Snatch/Melodie en sous-sol (Jean Gabin) Henri Verneuil

 

71 Le Chat (Jean Gabin & Simone Signoret)

 

Trying to get subtitled copies of them is a huge challenge.  The subtitles often exist on film prints but not on the dvd versions.  Go figure.

 

Andy, I recall you mentioning that you were not a fan of films set in the 19th century.  Is that just Hollywood films set in that era?

 

I think the French are the best at films set in this period and in the 18th century.  Les Enfants du Paradis comes to mind.  But there are lots of them.

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I'm lovin' it.

My list would keep me going to 150 as well.  When I come across a title with some sort of recommendation I usually make note of it.

For instance, I'm still on the lookout for these Jean Gabin's:

 

37 Lady Killer/Gueule D’Amour (Jean Gabin) Jean Gremillon

 

41 Remorques/Stormy Waters (Jean Gabin) Jean Gremillon

 

49 The Walls of Malapaga/Au-Dela des Grilles (Isa Miranda & Jean Gabin) Rene Clement

 

51 La Nuit est Mon Royaume (Jean Gabin)

 

54 The Air of Paris (Jean Gabin)

 

55 Razzia Sur La Chnouf/Chnouf (Jean Gabin) Henri Decon

 

56 Deadlier than the Male (Jean Gabin) Julien Duvivier

 

56 Des Gens Sans Importance (Jean Gabin) Henri Verneuil

 

56 Pig Across Paris/La Traverse de Paris (Jean Gabin, Bourvil) Claude Autant-Lara

 

58 Maigret Sets a Trap/Inspector Maigret/Woman-Bait (Jean Gabin) Jean Delannoy

 

58 The Possessors (Jean Gabin) Denys De La Patelliere

 

59 The Magnificent Tramp/Archimede le Clochard (Jean Gabin)

 

63 Any Number Can Win/The Big Snatch/Melodie en sous-sol (Jean Gabin) Henri Verneuil

 

71 Le Chat (Jean Gabin & Simone Signoret)

 

Trying to get subtitled copies of them is a huge challenge.  The subtitles often exist on film prints but not on the dvd versions.  Go figure.

 

Andy, I recall you mentioning that you were not a fan of films set in the 19th century.  Is that just Hollywood films set in that era?

 

I think the French are the best at films set in this period and in the 18th century.  Les Enfants du Paradis comes to mind.  But there are lots of them.

 

Several of those Gabins you list were shown on his SUTS day in 2011 (August 18th), which may have been the greatest day in my TCM viewing history.  Here's the complete list of that day's schedule:

 

6:00 AM  GUEULE D'AMOUR (1937)

  A retired cavalry officer discovers the woman who won his heart was in love with the uniform.

Dir: Jean Gremillon Cast:  Jean Gabin ,

BW-88 mins, TV-PG,

8:00 AM  REMORQUES (1941)

  A married tugboat captain falls for a woman he rescues from a sinking ship.

Dir: Jean Gremillon Cast:  Jean Gabin , Alain Cuny ,

BW-83 mins, TV-PG,

9:30 AM  JOUR SE LEVE, LE (1939)

  A young factory worker loses the woman he loves to a vicious schemer.

Dir: Marcel Carne Cast:  Jean Gabin , Jacqueline Laurent , Arletty .

BW-90 mins, TV-PG,

11:00 AM  AIR DE PARIS, L' (1954)

  An over-the-hill boxer stakes his fortune on training a young railroad-worker.

Dir: Marcel Carne Cast:  Arletty , Jean Gabin , Roland Lesaffre .

BW-100 mins,

1:00 PM  LEUR DERNIERE NUIT (1953)

  A schoolteacher falls for a librarian who's secretly the head of a criminal ring.

Dir: Georges Lacombe Cast:  Jean Gabin ,

BW-91 mins, TV-PG,

2:45 PM  DESORDRE ET LA NUIT, LE (1958)

  A homicide detective tries to protect a pretty drug addict implicated in a murder.

Dir: Gilles Grangier Cast:  Jean Gabin , Danielle Darrieux , Nadja Tiller .

BW-91 mins, TV-PG,

4:30 PM  MARIA CHAPDELAINE (1934)

  A Canadian frontierswoman must choose from among three suitors.

Dir: Julien Duvivier Cast:  Jean Gabin ,

BW-72 mins, TV-G,

6:00 PM  BANDERA, LA (1934)

  A murderer escapes France to join the Spanish Foreign Legion, where he finds love while pursued by the law.

Dir: Julien Duvivier Cast:  Jean Gabin ,

BW-97 mins, TV-PG,

8:00 PM  PEPE LE MOKO (1941)

  Love for a beautiful woman draws a gangster out of hiding.

Dir: Julien Duvivier Cast:  Jean Gabin , Mireille Balin , Gabriel Gabrio .

BW-94 mins, TV-PG,

10:00 PM  GRAND ILLUSION (1937)

  French POWs fight to escape their German captors during World War I.

Dir: Jean Renoir Cast:  Jean Gabin , Pierre Fresnay , Marcel Dalio .

BW-113 mins, TV-PG,

12:00 AM  LA BETE HUMAINE (1938)

  A railroad engineer enters an affair with his friend's amoral wife.

BW-97 mins,

2:00 AM  TOUCHEZ PAS AU GRISBI (1954)

  An aging gangster comes out of retirement when his best friend is kidnapped.

BW-96 mins,

4:00 AM  DES GENS SANS IMPORTANCE (1955)

  An unhappy waitress starts an affair with a married truck driver.

Dir: Henri Verneuil Cast:  Jean Gabin ,

BW-99 mins, TV-PG,

 

Of course since Gabin was in 95 films, that still leaves us with a good way to go....

 

As for my comment about films set in the 19th century (and more generally, not in the present or very recent past), that was a bit of hyperbole, but not much.  I do love Children of Paradise, as well as both Chaney's and Laughton's Hunchback of Notre Dame, and several others, but for the most part movies like this, especially from post-silent era Hollywood, usually devolve into little more than costume dramas and / or sword fights, neither of which particularly thrill me.

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I will keep a keen eye out for those Gabin titles on TCM in the future.

 

I've been in England for most of the past 12 years so it has cut into my TCM recording of some very interesting stuff.  TCM UK is dreck and full of commercials.

 

On the flip side there are just so many more dvds over here that you can pick up than you can in Canada.

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I'm not big on the term bucket list. It's one of those phrases that

suddenly spread as an idea from pop culture and now everyone

has to have one. Sort of like the term soul mate. It became very

popular a while back and now everyone has to have a soul mate.

Whatever.

 

That's how new words are introduced. I once read a book on English usage from the '60s by Bergen Evans and he gripes about the sudden popularity of the word "charisma".

 

As Nero Wolfe (I've mentioned him in this thread before, and am about to again in another post) famously said, "Contact is not a verb under this roof". Well I grew up with contact as a verb, and it's never bothered me. The one I refuse to accept is "impact" -- "Johnny Unitas significantly impacted NFL quarterbacking". I will never surrender the fight.

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Trying to get subtitled copies of them is a huge challenge.  

 

Try and find them for 40 year old Italian TV shows

 

Around 1970 Italian TV did several series of Nero Wolfe episodes. Some are on YT. They look fairly promising but they are so dependent on dialogue I need subtitles to appreciate them.

 

Perhaps someday we'll get to see these:

 

NY Times, Mar 14 1959:

 

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nerowolfeshatner.jpg

 

 

A pilot and 3-4 half hour episodes were shot, but the network could not find a sponsor. Shatner is far from my ideal Archie and the half hour format doesn't seem right for stories based on character. But Kasznar is a promising Wolfe, and perhaps someday we'll get to see his approach to the character.

 

I might as well mention The Fat Man, another 1959 pilot from an old radio show. In this version, he's pretty much Nero Wolfe in all but name (only a lot more active physically). A solid script by crime vets Goff and Roberts is given a few noir touches by director Joseph Lewis, and Robert Middleton --probably a bit too much of a coiled spring to be successful as a quietly intimidating Wolfe -- is quite good in the title role. A very well done pilot, too bad it didn't sell as a series.

 

Last time I checked The Fat Man pilot could be seen on YouTube.

 

 

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That's how new words are introduced. I once read a book on English usage from the '60s by Bergen Evans and he gripes about the sudden popularity of the word "charisma".

 

I remember when the words "problem" and "problems" were used for decades, but now they have been replaced by the word "issues" and the term "problematic"

 

The media used the word "charisma" a lot to refer to JFK in the early '60s.

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Yeah, well, I just checked my bucket today and it has an issue..err..problem. Found a hole in the bottom of it. Won't hold any lists.

 

(...but on a lighter note...I'm thinking I'd like to watch all the Best Picture Winners of the last 20 years or so, that is the ones I missed going to see upon their initial release and haven't yet caught on home video...I think there's currently about 9 or 10 of 'em now...I've seen all of 'em made before then) 

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I'm not big on the term bucket list. It's one of those phrases that

suddenly spread as an idea from pop culture and now everyone

has to have one. Sort of like the term soul mate. It became very

popular a while back and now everyone has to have a soul mate.

Whatever.

 

If I did have a movie bucket list, I'd put watching the complete

filmography of R.W. Fassbinder on it. I've probably got about

ten down and thirty to go, more or less. R.W. really cranked

them out, so if he were still alive and making films, that goal

would just be moving further and further away. With his early,

unfortunate, death, the task is very doable.

I actually agree with you.  It was an attempt to coin a 'must see list' idea.  It has become something which explains a sentiment pretty readily.

 

Re, Fassbender I have Berlin Alexanderplatz on my list of must sees at some point.  Like you, I've seen exactly 10 of his films.  I like Mother Kusters, Fox and His Friends, and Marriage of Maria Braun the best of what I have seen.

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I actually agree with you.  It was an attempt to coin a 'must see list' idea.  It has become something which explains a sentiment pretty readily.

 

Re, Fassbender I have Berlin Alexanderplatz on my list of must sees at some point.  Like you, I've seen exactly 10 of his films.  I like Mother Kusters, Fox and His Friends, and Marriage of Maria Braun the best of what I have seen.

 

I'm glad you mentioned Berlin Alexanderplatz.  My wife talked me into springing for the entire set during last Summer's Criterion Collection half price sale, but so far we've only made it through the first half of the first disk.  We're going to have to step it up a notch.

 

Too many movies, too little time. :blink:

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I think the term "bucket list" refers to a list of things you want to do before you "kick the bucket."

 

On a somewhat related note, i don't see too many people taking the ice bucket challenge anymore. 

 

Speaking of kicking the bucket, I remember seeing It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World for the first time in the cinema and howling with laughter when Jimmy Durante tells the secret of the Big W and then literally kicks a bucket and dies.  Very cute joke.

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I figure some of the movies on my 'Bucket List' may not even exist anymore with all film prints lost, but I reckon there's a chance I'll get to see some of these:

 

    P.J. (1968) (Original theatrical version / a Universal Picture)

     EYE OF THE CAT (1969)  (Original theatrical version / a Universal Picture)

 

     Blueprint for Robbery (1961)  w/J. Pat O'Malley

     Hell With Heroes, The (1968) C-95m.  w/Rod Taylor, Peter Deuel, Harry Guardino & Claudia Cardinale         

     Jigsaw (1968)  A re-working of the 1965 film "Mirage" with late '60s "mod" trappings.  A Universal Picture

     Night of the Witches (1970)  (Tv print still exists; theatrical version currently in the "Lost" category)

     Puzzle of a Downfall Child (1970)  starring Faye Dunaway

     Red Sky at Morning (1970)  (I'd gladly watch either the TV print or the theatrical version)

     Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up To Me (1971) C-90m.

     B.S. I Love You (1971) C-99m.

     One More Train to Rob (1971)    

     T.R. Baskin (1971) C-90m. [PG]

     You've Got To Walk It Like You Talk It Or You'll Lose That Beat (1971) Filmed in 1968

     Fan's Notes, A (1972-Canadian)   

    Stand Up and Be Counted (1972)    

    Arnold's Wrecking Co. (1973)  (probably a "lost" film)

     Don't Just Lie There, Say Something! (1973-UK)  [PG] 

     Hard Part Begins, The (1973-Canadian)

     I Could Never Have Sex With Any Man Who Has So Little Respect for my Husband (1973) C-86m. [R]

     Akenfield (1974-UK)  a British movie I'd very much like to see.

     All I Want Is You . . . and You . . . and You (1974-UK)  (This British comedy is likely a lost film).   

     Inbreaker, The (1974-Canadian)

     Moments (1974-UK)  w/Keith Michell, Angharad Rees.  I'd ♥ to see this British movie, but where is it?

     Mrs. Barrington (1974) a Chuck Vincent film.  Some of director Chuck Vincent's movies have been made available on homevideo; this isn't one of them. 

     Sheila Levine is Dead and Living in New York City (1975) C-113m.

     Baby Blue Marine (1976)  (I've had a chance to see this in the past, but missed it). 

     Winds of Autumn, The (1976) C-100m. [PG]  A Charles B. Pierce film

     Towing (1977) w/Sue Lyon

     Convention Girls (1978) C-95m. [R]  ► I have a poster for this movie, but can't find a copy of the movie itself anywhere.   

     Robin (1979) w/Monica Tidwell.  Dir:  Hank Aldrich

     Young Cycle Girls, The (1979)  The "Tv version" of this movie was released on video; the original theatrical version is  -?-       

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Speaking of kicking the bucket, I remember seeing It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World for the first time in the cinema and howling with laughter when Jimmy Durante tells the secret of the Big W and then literally kicks a bucket and dies.  Very cute joke.

 

I wonder how the expresssion "kick the bucket" came into being?

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Has anyone seen Sounder Part Two?  Made in 1976, directed by William A. Graham.

 

I don't have it handy, but I think Leonard Maltin highly recommended it and I liked the original.  But where is this film?  It doesn't even have any imdb reviews.  The imdb lists ABC Broadcasting as the distributor.

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Has anyone seen Sounder Part Two?  Made in 1976, directed by William A. Graham.

 

I don't have it handy, but I think Leonard Maltin highly recommended it and I liked the original.  But where is this film?  It doesn't even have any imdb reviews.  The imdb lists ABC Broadcasting as the distributor.

 

Usually the Maltin reviews work in reverse although apparently the Maltin review was accurate about THE RED SHOES.

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