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26 minutes ago, Lori Ann said:

This afternoon I watched "Gold of the Seven Saints" with Roger Moore & Clint Walker. It was from 1961. I'm more of a Roger Moore fan with the James Bond movies. I've seen him in a couple non-Bond movies. But that's what I prefer. I've watched "The Saint" with my dad. I'm not too familiar with Clint Walker. The movie was directed by Gordon Douglas. I know some of his movies. I didn't think the movie needed to be black & white. Usually I don't care. But I think the movie should have been in color. It was a good movie though; but not fantastic.

GOLD OF THE SEVEN SAINTS photo CLINT WALKER/ROGER MOORE

Lori

I'm a big fan of The Saint,  especially the beginning years when they were in B&W.    Moore played the Saint with a lot of charm and the show was gritty and often dark. 

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On 11/6/2020 at 7:58 PM, midwestan said:

Congrats on hitting 1000 pages on the "I Just Watched" thread.  Quite an achievement!  Thanks for creating it 5 and a half years ago Speedracer5!

Agreed. Especially notable this thread survives on it's own organic path of discussion. Speedracer does not interject with one sentence responses just to pad the thread count.

I just watched THE RUNAWAY BUS '54

The_Runaway_Bus.jpg

As a fan of Margaret Rutherford, I had a fair idea of what kind of movie this would be & it did not disappoint. A British farcical type comedy, short & sweet with fabulous performances of all kinds from straight camp to slapstick. While I found his adult prat falling silly, the snarky one line zingers written for Frankie Howard often made me LOL. He is the malcontent bus driver with a bunch of loony passengers in a kind of mystery whodunit akin to an Abbot & Costello movie. 

Rutherford pretty much played her predictable self, a crusty old lady (personal aspiration of mine) and Petula Clark was a gorgeous gal in uniform. Clark was such a talented actor, singer, dancer, really pretty....why wasn't she a bigger star?

Only a 78 minute investment, This is the kind of movie to escape your daily doldrums.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

also congratulations to SPEEDRACER for living in a state that just LEGALIZED ALL DRUGS.

"Legalized", or "Decriminalized"?  There's a difference.   (Especially when you still get arrested for the latter.)

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Did anyone what It's Trad, Dad!   I watched most of it.      Interesting direction.     I didn't know who directed the film until today but while  watching it (after A Hard's Day Night),  I said to my wife that I had a feeling it was directed by Richard Lester.    I did like the clever (but yea, sometimes corny)  breaking the third-wall and other stunt direction.   I always find these early 60s films to be interesting in that rock and jazz coexisted.     I.e.  the younger generation wasn't exclusively  into Rock and Roll since that genre was just getting started.   Below from Wiki. 

It's Trad, Dad! (1962), known in the U.S. as Ring-A-Ding Rhythm, is a British musical comedy featuring performances by a variety of dixieland jazz bands and rock-and-roll singers. The film was one of the first produced by Amicus Productions, a company known predominantly for horror films. It was director Richard Lester's first feature film.[3]

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7 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Did anyone what It's Trad, Dad!   I watched most of it.      Interesting direction.     I didn't know who directed the film until today but while  watching it (after A Hard's Day Night),  I said to my wife that I had a feeling it was directed by Richard Lester.    I did like the clever (but yea, sometimes corny)  breaking the third-wall and other stunt direction.   I always find these early 60s films to be interesting in that rock and jazz coexisted.    I.e. I.e.  the younger generation wasn't exclusive into Rock and Roll since that genre was just getting started.   Below from Wiki. 

It's Trad, Dad! (1962), known in the U.S. as Ring-A-Ding Rhythm, is a British musical comedy featuring performances by a variety of dixieland jazz bands and rock-and-roll singers. The film was one of the first produced by Amicus Productions, a company known predominantly for horror films. It was director Richard Lester's first feature film.[3]

I had seen it before on TCM, and it introduced me to a 60s music fad that I had previously not known.

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7 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

I had seen it before on TCM, and it introduced me to a 60s music fad that I had previously not known.

The show Mad Man would explore this musical territory (crossover years from late 50s to early 60)  but from the New York scene.

 

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Last night watched My Favorite Year before watching various cooking show repeats.  Then I watched the end of Notre Dame Clemson game - went into overtime.  I'm not a big college football fan but it was a tight game.  COVID cases on the rise, and the lack following proper protocol stunned me.  Our pro team (the Bills) is unable to have anyone in attendance due to the pandemic.  Then I watched, out of curiosity, the opening of SNL.  I thought that Jim Carey, especially when he pulled out a smokin gun, channeled his mask character.  I also didn't like Maya's/Kamala's comment about drunken mothers.  The two actors don't seem to mesh.  I like her but lose him (one person's opinion).  I did think Alec Baldwin was funny with his rendition of Macho Man (especially with its subtext (right word?).  This a.m. watched a heartbreaking piece about Independent Book Stores.  I remember the Strand in NYC.  And, Sophia Loren shows that, at 86 years young, she is still gorgeous.

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

also congratulations to SPEEDRACER for living in a state that just LEGALIZED ALL DRUGS.

Fully expect all her posts henceforth to be like:

giphy.gif

UQ67.gif

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I did like the clever (but yea, sometimes corny)  breaking the third-wall and other stunt direction. 

It works greatly to the movie's benefit that Lester and the writers knew to take the material with all the seriousness it deserved, which is none at all.  (I don't mean that in a bad way.)

I think my favorite is the Lawrence Welk record, but I also like when Helen and Craig somebody do something with the officious guard at the entrance to the studio, and he immediately gets a pie in the face!

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On 11/6/2020 at 8:47 PM, TomJH said:

I have the DVD of Vertigo in which the film ends with a fade out as Stewart stands outside the bell tower looking down after Kim has fallen to her death.

There is an extra on the DVD, though, of the "Foreign Censorship Ending" Hithcock shot, coming right after the above scene's fade out, which shows Midge (Bel Geddes) listening to a radio reporting that Ester, last seen in France, will be extradited once he is caught. Stewart then returns to her apartment looking glum. She hands him a drink, they say nothing to one another and the film ends.

It's a limp tag on designed to wrap up the story with Elster and Scotty and Midge together but who knows where, if anywhere, their relationship is headed. IMO it lacks the haunting quality of seeing Stewart's stunned reaction to having lost Madeliene/Judy a second time.

vertigo_1.jpg

What a weird ending. I'd never heard of this. WHY? Did France demand that Elster face the music somehow?

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Just now, LornaHansonForbes said:

I'M GLAD AMERICA IS BACK!!!!!!!!!!

PS- I HAD THE HARDEST *****ING TIME CHANGING THE AVATAR!!!!!!!! I'VE BEEN TRYING FOR MONTHS TO DO IT!

PSS- DELETE SOME OF YOUR MESSAGES! YO INBOX IS FULL

OK! LOL.

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2 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Apparently, your profile photo has to be EENTY TEENTY TINETY like less than one KB or something, and i kept doing screenshots on my phone and editi9ng and compressing them, but they were all TOO BIG TO FIT.)

I'm afraid to mess with mine. I remember I had a hard time initially many years ago.

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The Russia House (1990)

Low key spy drama, based on a novel by John le Carre, with Sean Connery as a British publisher recruited by British intelligence for espionage work during his frequent trips to Russia. It's interesting to see an actor remembered for playing the flashiest spy of them all as James Bond now appearing in a realistic spy drama without gun play, explosions or squealing tires. Adding to the film's credibility is its on location shooting in Russia. The problem for me is that I found the story quite confusing much of the time and had difficulty keeping up with what was happening.

In a late '90s interview Sean Connery expressed affection for this film and I can understand why inasmuch as he delivers an excellent performance as the gruff, plain speaking publisher recruited into a world of espionage so foreign to him. Michelle Pfeiffer, adopting a credible Russian accent, delivers a fine performance, as well. James Fox is Connery's primary British intelligence contact, with Roy Scheider working for the CIA and Klaus Maria Brandauer a Russian with nuclear secrets he is trying to get out of his country.

Despite the quality performances and the overall admirably realistic presentation this film is a significant disappointment for me due to the complicated story. Someone brighter than me who can better follow the plot may enjoy this film more. I found it all a bit tedious.

MV5BMjk3ZThjNTktOTEwZi00YTMzLWJhMmMtNmFi

2.5 out of 4

 

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5 minutes ago, TomJH said:

The Russia House (1990)

Low key spy drama, based on a novel by John le Carre, with Sean Connery as a British publisher recruited by British intelligence for espionage work during his frequent trips to Russia. The problem is I found the story quite confusing much of the time and had difficulty keeping up with what was happening.

John LeCarre' may have had his own movie x-production wing for getting his novels filmed fresh off of publication, and most of them are good--I haven't seen Diane Keaton in "The Little Drummer Girl" or Philip Hoffman in "A Most Wanted Man", and didn't finish Ralph Fiennes in "The Constant Gardener", but found Geoffrey Rush and Pierce Brosnan in the post-Panama cry-wolf story The Tailor of Panama (2001) surprisingly watchable.

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24 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ANY PIC OF GEORGE BRENT WOULD DEFINITELY BE TOO LARGE TO UPLOAD!!!!!!!

ONE DOES NOT EVEN THINK OF CROPPING OR COMPRESSING GEORGE BRENT!

LMREO!!!!!

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I enjoyed the Russia House when I saw it years ago.  Good cast and your mention of James Fox reminds me of a film his brother made, Day of the Jackal.  Much better, in my opinion, then the one that was made with Bruce Willis in the role for numerous reasons.  I'm not say it wasn't watchable, but it didn't resemble the Forsythe (I think) novel.

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7 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

I enjoyed the Russia House when I saw it years ago. 

I can understand that because the film has a lot of things going for it. Connery is exceptionally good. Maybe it's not fair of me to ask because you haven't seen the film for a long time, but do you recall if you had difficulty following that complicated plot? That was the bugaboo for me.

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

The Russia House (1990)

Low key spy drama, based on a novel by John le Carre, with Sean Connery as a British publisher recruited by British intelligence for espionage work during his frequent trips to Russia. It's interesting to see an actor remembered for playing the flashiest spy of them all as James Bond now appearing in a realistic spy drama without gun play, explosions or squealing tires. Adding to the film's credibility is its on location shooting in Russia. The problem for me is that I found the story quite confusing much of the time and had difficulty keeping up with what was happening.

In a late '90s interview Sean Connery expressed affection for this film and I can understand why inasmuch as he delivers an excellent performance as the gruff, plain speaking publisher recruited into a world of espionage so foreign to him. Michelle Pfeiffer, adopting a credible Russian accent, delivers a fine performance, as well. James Fox is Connery's primary British intelligence contact, with Roy Scheider working for the CIA and Klaus Maria Brandauer a Russian with nuclear secrets he is trying to get out of his country.

Despite the quality performances and the overall admirably realistic presentation this film is a significant disappointment for me due to the complicated story. Someone brighter than me who can better follow the plot may enjoy this film more. I found it all a bit tedious.

MV5BMjk3ZThjNTktOTEwZi00YTMzLWJhMmMtNmFi

2.5 out of 4

 

Tom, I had read The Russia House and it literally put me to sleep several nights in a row. Not one of John Le Carre's better novels. I thought the movie would be better, but darned if for once they didn't follow the book closely. You mentioned all the good points about the film, especially the location shooting and the performances of Sean Connery and Michelle Pfeiffer. This is the very best of her performances that I've seen. She is believably Russian. I would recommend the movie to fans of Connery and Pfeiffer except that, dang, this movie is boring.

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7 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Tom, I had read The Russia House and it literally put me to sleep several nights in a row. Not one of John Le Carre's better novels. I thought the movie would be better, but darned if for once they didn't follow the book closely. You mentioned all the good points about the film, especially the location shooting and the performances of Sean Connery and Michelle Pfeiffer. This is the very best of her performances that I've seen. She is believably Russian. I would recommend the movie to fans of Connery and Pfeiffer except that, dang, this movie is boring.

It's so frustrating when you see performances you love in a film you can resist.

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