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Today was Bogart Day on TCM so I watched THE BIG SLEEP for the umpteenth time. I love Bogart ; especially when he appears with Lauren Bacall. As mentioned on this site many times before the plot is about as convoluted as one can get. It seems like every time I watch this film I pick up on a plot point I missed in earlier viewings. Reviewers have said this Howard Hawks film wasn't about the various crimes, but about all of the complex characters. Also, the plot was intentionally overshadowed by the focus on Bogart and Bacall. I feel sure all of you regular posters have seen the film many times and have an understanding about who was blackmailing who and who murdered who.  I'm still a little fuzzy on how Joe Brody fit into the scheme of things but I think I get most of what happened and how all the players fit together.  I know much of this has been covered before. I'm just running it up the flagpole one more time to see who salutes.

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4 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

Today was Bogart Day on TCM so I watched THE BIG SLEEP for the umpteenth time. I love Bogart ; especially when he appears with Lauren Bacall. As mentioned on this site many times before the plot is about as convoluted as one can get. It seems like every time I watch this film I pick up on a plot point I missed in earlier viewings. Reviewers have said this Howard Hawks film wasn't about the various crimes, but about all of the complex characters. Also, the plot was intentionally overshadowed by the focus on Bogart and Bacall. I feel sure all of you regular posters have seen the film many times and have an understanding about who was blackmailing who and who murdered who.  I'm still a little fuzzy on how Joe Brody fit into the scheme of things but I think I get most of what happened and how all the players fit together.  I know much of this has been covered before. I'm just running it up the flagpole one more time to see who salutes.

Have you seen the initial 1945 release?   This one doesn't have as much Bogart \ Bacall love interest stuff and the storyline is slightly easier to follow.

There are other differences as well:  E.g. a different actress playing Mrs. Eddie Mars,   Bacall having different outfits,  two additional very short scenes with Carmen , etc..

Hawks was asked to re-shoot the film after Bogart and Bacall got married as part of the WB promotional campaign.

 

 

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37 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Have you seen the initial 1945 release?   This one doesn't have as much Bogart \ Bacall love interest stuff and the storyline is slightly easier to follow.

There are other differences as well:  E.g. a different actress playing Mrs. Eddie Mars,   Bacall having different outfits,  two additional very short scenes with Carmen , etc..

Hawks was asked to re-shoot the film after Bogart and Bacall got married as part of the WB promotional campaign.

 

 

No, I haven't seen this version. I will look for it because it sounds intriguing. Also, I'm thinking I should read Chandler's novel. As a fan of movies, I always wonder how closely Hollywood follows these great pieces of literature when they decide to bring them to the big screen. I always remember reading THE GODFATHER by Mario Puzo before Coppola bought the movie rights. I had a completely different picture of Vito Corleone in my mind. It took me awhile to come around on Brando's portrayal of the character. That is why I usually see a movie first before I read the novel. I think the only time where I read the book before seeing the movie where I was immediately comfortable with the casting was TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD. Gregory Peck was perfect as Atticus Finch for me.

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1 hour ago, Hoganman1 said:

No, I haven't seen this version. I will look for it because it sounds intriguing. Also, I'm thinking I should read Chandler's novel. As a fan of movies, I always wonder how closely Hollywood follows these great pieces of literature when they decide to bring them to the big screen. I always remember reading THE GODFATHER by Mario Puzo before Coppola bought the movie rights. I had a completely different picture of Vito Corleone in my mind. It took me awhile to come around on Brando's portrayal of the character. That is why I usually see a movie first before I read the novel. I think the only time where I read the book before seeing the movie where I was immediately comfortable with the casting was TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD. Gregory Peck was perfect as Atticus Finch for me.

A few chances in the 1945 \ 46 movie version of The Big Sleep:

 Marlow is the one sleeping with Mrs. Mars and not Sean Regan (who in the book was Vivien's ex-husband and not just a hired hand).        Therefore Eddie Mars had an ax to grind with Marlow that wasn't related to the killing of Sean Regan.       But since they wanted to play up the romance between the leading male and female characters (Marlowe and Vivien,  this was changed,  and once Bogart and Bacall married,  was played up to the hilt even more!).

Carmen did kill Sean Regan,  and not Eddie Mars.     Eddie had no reason to kill Regan (since he wasn't sleeping with Mrs. Regan).    Carmen did because Regan wouldn't sleep with her.

Carmen is indeed drugged and the photos were taken for porn magazine use (the bookstore was a front for this),   with owner Geiger,  being gay as well as his henchman Carol Lundgren  (which in the movie Hawks implies by having Lundgren dress Geiger up,  place him in his bed to honor his dead boss \ lover).     In the book the scene where Marlowe takes the gun away from Lundgren is,  well,,,  today we would say homophobic.   I.e.  of course Marlowe can overcome a gay man,,, since they are wimps etc...

 

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1 hour ago, Lori Ann said:

Yesterday I watched "Lady Be Good".  It was a very good film.  Another Red Skelton film marked off my list  :)  The Berry Brothers are amazing!

Lady Be Good (1941)   Berry Brothers - Fascinating Rythm in the film Lady Be Good (1941) - YouTube

Lori

I really enjoyed Lady Be Good too.  I love Eleanor Powell's dance number where she wears palazzo pants and dances with her dog. 

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22 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I really enjoyed Lady Be Good too.  I love Eleanor Powell's dance number where she wears palazzo pants and dances with her dog. 

I liked that dance also!  She's amazing!!  And the dog was cute.

Lori

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Okay, here's an odd one, but like the title says, I DID just watch it:

- Captive Wild Woman (1943), Jungle Woman (1944), Jungle Captive (1945) -  👎

As a kid, I used to read a big illustrated alphabetic index-book of all the great fantastic-movie monsters (whose definitions were loose enough to include Dr. Lao and the white blood cells from Fantastic Voyage), and one I never seemed to recognize was Universal's "Paula, the Ape Girl".  🤔   Despite her Jack Pierce makeup being a female studio spin on Lon Chaney, Jr., the character was actually the new 40's post-Monsters mentality at the studio--When RKO's "Cat People" had become the new horror darling in 1942, and every studio, even Universal, now wanted their own spooky, abstract-shadows Val Lewton piece, and their own smoldering exotic Simone Simone with animal magnetism.  (Who was the poster who recently complained about Nina Foch in "Cry of the Werewolf", for example?)   Thanks to Shout Factory digging up reissues of Universal's well-hidden boxsets of their throwaway 40's B-horror, I was able to finally track down the entire Paula Trilogy on Blu-ray, but the backstage behind-the-scenes drama unfortunately ruined a young monster-fan's fun:

Universal had made a big promotion out of discovering exotic newcomer Acquanetta--who was either Venezuelan or Arapaho native, depending on which publicity story you read--as the circus gorilla whom standard mad-scientist John Carradine transforms into human spooky-girl, and who finds a job helping the circus trainer, but reverts to old habits in Irena-like moments of unrequited jealousy.  And thereby hangs a backstage tale with unique resonance for our post-George Floyd/BLM era:  Even though we only get ONE chintzy but effective Larry Talbot transformation in "Captive Wild Woman", the YT clip explains much of the backstory:

...Seems harmless enough stuff.  Unfortunately, the critic for US 30's-Communist newspaper The Daily Worker, whose paper had been deliberately trying to pick Fox News fights over "racial unrest" in the decadent West, looked at the scene of Paula's hand and face turning gorilla-dark, and not only cried that the movie was Universal's "obscene metaphor for the 'inferiority' of the Negro race, by directly comparing them to apes", but that Universal itself should be Canceled over John Carradine's standard mad-scientist speech about transformation experiments to create new supermen as "Hitler propaganda from a Hollywood studio".  (Keeping in mind the US Communists' love-hate relationship with the war during the early 40's.)   Silly, yes, but enough to rattle Universal into keeping Paula's transformation and monster offscreen for all of the quickie "Jungle Woman" sequel, except for one last money shot in the end after safely being 'twas-killed...And even THAT wasn't enough to silence the critic's tantrum, who not only continued to rail against "Nazi" Universal for their "propaganda" in making a sequel, but also took a drive-by ruin at Acquanetta's career, by publicly outing that the Arapaho "Venezuelan volcano" was actually light-skinned black Mabel Davenport from Virginia, who was using her racial ambiguity to keep her career from being destroyed.  Unfortunately, it worked.

By the time Universal came back to the third quickie, "Jungle Captive", they dropped all their baggage:  Paula was back on screen again (thanks to mad scientist Otto Kruger's electricity experiments), but no transformations, Acquanetta was replaced by newcomer Vicky Lane, and more screen time in the story was devoted to Universal's new horror-discovery at the studio, Rondo Hatton, as the mad-scientist's goon-turned-good in the climax.  (And FWIW, Rondo did have surprisingly effective screen presence, for his B-roles.)  So, basically, in the end, thanks to a lot of meddling, the above clip is a memorial to all that monster fans are ever going to GET of Paula the Ape Girl, and us former kids with big monster books will have to sigh for what could have been.  😢

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Something in the City (1950)

 

This is a perfectly delightful bit of nothing! It begins as a typical British comedy with a few silly moments and a little physical humour. It is at the moment that it nearly begins to drag that it becomes a romp of Richard Hearne's slapstick antics. A frenetic chase rivals Chaplin's and Lloyd's work. It is a tour de force of the highest order.

This was a: quota-quickie and showcases one of Britain's most loved and respected comedians. 

8/9

Available on Amazon Prime Video at no additional cost.

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The Bonnie Parker Story (1958)

One of a number of late '50s productions about '30s gangsters, the exploitational aspects of this "B" are firmly established in the film's opening titles when the audience gets a peak-a-boo look through the window of a seedy room as the title character slowly removes her clothes. While there is a no name supporting cast, Dorothy Provine is sensationally sexy as the hard bitten cigar chomping tommy gun blasting title character.

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The film bares little resemblance to history (no surprise). Historians debate as to whether the real Bonnie Parker ever killed anybody. That is not the case in this production, with Provine's Bonnie soon tommy gun blasting a traffic cop into another world after he makes the mistake of stopping the car she and her partner are in. And she doesn't blink an eye as she does it.

Clyde Barrow, the two bit psychopathic thug who was a real killer, gets virtually no mention in this film's screenplay. Bonnie is tougher, smarter and more ruthless than any of the male two bit thugs who pick up with her here, which will undoubtedly please many feminist viewers today. The screenplay also throws out suggestions that if Parker had met a nice guy early in her life, instead of punks, it might have turned out differently for her.

William Witney, remembered by fans of Republic serials as the director behind many of the best of that genre, keeps things moving quickly. In many ways this film is more of a '50s time capsule than anything else inasmuch as the fashions worn are '50s, rather than '30s, and there is rock and roll music on the soundtrack. Jack Hogan and Richard Bakalyan plays Bonnie's two small time hood partners in crime. More recognizable faces in the supporting cast are those of Joseph Turkel as the brother of one of Bonnie's partners, and Douglas Kennedy as a cop hunting the gang across various states as they are on the run.

This film will have increased interest historically, of course, because of the success of Warren Beatty's award winning production of Bonnie and Clyde a decade later. But this unpretentious little production holds up quite nicely on its own, with its central protagonists far more ruthless than anything to be seen from either Beatty or Faye Dunaway years later.

But let there be no doubt that The Bonnie Parker Story is primarily Provine's show and her sexy, hard portrayal, with only a slight fleeting  hint of vulnerability, makes it worthwhile. At one point the fatalistic Bonnie sums up her life path with one memorable line of dialogue: "We got ourselves a one way ticket. There's nothing you can do once you get on it but drive right to the end of the line."

6b476f1fcc833401a447da2a0c3817ee.jpg880px-BonnieParkerCigar1933.jpg

The_Bonnie_Parker_Story-559464219-large.

2.5 out of 4

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I had the distinct pleasure of watching GREMLINS 2: THE NEW BATCH yesterday morning.

I am a huge fan of THE BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN. I've never seen GODFATHER II. THE LORD OF THE RINGS MOVIES I can take or leave.

Thusly I put it to you that THIS is THE GREATEST SEQUEL OF ALL TIME.

I also say TO HELL with MISS DAISY, HENRY V, HEATHERS, BATMAN and DO THE RIGHT THING, this IS THE BEST PICTURE OF 1989.

****EDIT- JUST NOW I SEE IT CAME OUT IN 1990.

From the moment the cow walks by in the laboratory with the mind-reading helmet on it that says "I am content. I am warm. I enjoy giving milk," this movie HAS ME. It is a master class in hilarious asides, there is a literal LAUGH OUT LOUD MOMENT every two minutes AT LEAST in this movie.

I also was STRUCK by the prescience of it, when all is said and done, I think NO FILM could ever REALLY DEPICT what the PAST FOUR YEARS HAVE FELT LIKE THAN THIS ONE and JOHN GLOVER even LOOKS JUST LIKE JARED KUSHNER IN ONE SCENE I SWEAR!

Zach Galligan is ADORABLE, Pheobe Cates is GORGEOUS and enters CAROLE LOMBARD territory with her comic delivery, HAVILLAND MORRIS (of 16 CANDLES) is RITA HAYWORTH LEVEL GORGEOUS, CHRISTOPHER LEE is MARVELOUS, TONY RANDALL as CARY GRANT as THE SMART GREMLIN, GEDDY "What's happenin' Hot Stuff?" WATANABE and ROBERT PROSKY as GRANDPA MUNSTER/COUNT FLOYD having a guerilla talk show while the first [IN GREMLIN FORM] extolls the virtues of CHAMBER MUSIC and SUSAN SONTAG is my EVERYTHING!

"OH! I NEED A POLAROID!"

"NUDIE! NUDIE! NUDIE!"

LEONARD MALTIN actually has a pretty fun cameo.

 

this movie is FUNNY AS ****, it's also something in the vein of one of those 1970's disaster films where disparate characters are THRUST TOGETHER by CALAMITY.

THERE IS ALSO ***NO WAY*** THAT IT IS A COINCIDENCE THAT THE TIME 4:20 IS AN IMPORTANT PLOT POINT IN THIS.

 

 

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10 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I give you credit for having the fortitude to sit through the sequel of a movie I felt was two wasted hours I'll never get back.

For me, same goes for THE GOONIES.  :rolleyes:

Sepiatone

I know taste is subjective (and I think the creatures themselves are disgusting) but seriously, try watching it again. I swear it's pretty prescient about some things (smart technology, a MEGALOMANICAL NYC REAL ESTATE DEVELPOR NAMED "CLAMP"- and they get some good TED TURNER jokes in there too.

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On 11/20/2020 at 8:55 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I had the distinct pleasure of watching GREMLINS 2: THE NEW BATCH yesterday morning.

And just count how many Warner product-placements we get for "Phantom of the Opera" (Phoebe Cates even wears a Broadway-mask pin), since the studio thought their official Joel Schumacher version of the musical would be filming the next year.  It didn't.

(Sharp eyes will also note Joe Dante putting "The Howling Pt. XII" on a NYC theater marquee in the background, and those who ever sat through Philippe Mora's bat***t-insane low-budget name-only #2 & 3 sequels will sympathize with Dante.)

On 11/20/2020 at 11:15 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I know taste is subjective (and I think the creatures themselves are disgusting) but seriously, try watching it again. I swear it's pretty prescient about some things (smart technology, a MEGALOMANICAL NYC REAL ESTATE DEVELPOR NAMED "CLAMP"- and they get some good TED TURNER jokes in there too.

and ROBERT PROSKY as GRANDPA MUNSTER/COUNT FLOYD having a guerilla talk show 

Nobody remembers Robert Prosky's "Grandpa Fred" movie host was a borrow from Ted Turner's early-90's TBS attempt to bring back Al Lewis's "Grandpa Munster" as an afternoon movie host, to compete with Commander USA and MST3K.  

Half the original 90's fun of Gremlins 2 was just how MANY jokes in the movie Ted Turner's cable channels had coming.  ("Casablanca, now colorized and with new happy ending!")

On 11/20/2020 at 11:02 AM, Sepiatone said:

I give you credit for having the fortitude to sit through the sequel of a movie I felt was two wasted hours I'll never get back.

For me, same goes for THE GOONIES.  :rolleyes:

The Goonies, as has been discussed before, is generationally-overrated wasted time.  

Gremlins 2, OTOH, is the clever movie you wish the first one could have been, after we all grew up from our 80's Spielberg honeymoon and wished someone else besides Chris Columbus could have tightened up the original.

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Confession (1937)


Ok, so this started with an old Bogart film, King of the Underworld (1939).  That was ok, but for me, it brought out a new favorite actress, Kay Francis (1905-1968).  IMDb describes her as “possibly the biggest of the ‘forgotten stars’ from Hollywood’s Golden Era”.  For me, it’s someone new to follow and I’m enjoying it.  I just watched Confession (1937).  Wow…  An old cabaret singer just trying to stay fed, finds herself in court for murdering a well known composer – and without any defense at all.  She refuses to speak.   Finally, she’s pushed into a corner by the court and takes the film into a flashback, going into the history of her and the composer.  


The part I enjoyed the most was the setup, 20 minutes without the top billing actress and what seems to have nothing to do with the expected plot of the film – a second plot if you will.  But, once Francis does turn up, takes us on that flashback, she brings it back around to the beginning of the film.  At times, actually replaying some of the scenes from the beginning, tying everything together.  A real “ohhhh…” moment.  Very nicely done.


This is apparently a very close remake of a German film, Mazurka (1935).  I put that on my wish list…

Confession.png

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51 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Thanks for your impressions. I've made that poster image into a magnet for MrTiki's locker-it's the cigar that slays me!

Actually, I think the tommy gun might have done a pretty good job at slaying you, too, Tiki Soo.

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DOROTHY PROVINE as Bonnie Parker?   Then FAYE DUNAWAY? 

But after eventually seeing photos of the real Parker and Barrow, for accuracy sake, maybe they should have been played by KEN CURTIS and SHEILA JAMES.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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Has anyone seen The Highwaymen, with Kevin Costner as Frank Hamer, the Texas Ranger who finally tracked down Bonnie and Clyde? A good film, with the two gangsters only appearing fleetingly in it. The drama has Hamer as its central character. I don't know how historically accurate it is compared to either The Bonnie Parker Story (which is largely fictional) or Bonnie and Clyde but it has the feel and atmosphere of its mid west Depression era setting (unlike the Dorothy Provine film). All three films end with the ambush in the car. Hamer was controversial as a man not leery of using deadly force.

Francis_Augustus_Hamer.jpg

Frank Hamer

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Douglas Kennedy as "Tom Steel" (Frank Hamer substitute) in The Bonnie Parker Story

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Denver Pyle as Frank Hamer in Bonnie and Clyde

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Kevin Costner as Frank Hamer in The Highwaymen

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End of the road for Bonnie and Clyde in 1934 Louisiana. The sudden explosive gunfire was so great that people in the area thought that dynamite had been used by some logging company to bring down a large tree.

 

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59 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Maybe so, but you know that at that point in her life Cloris was still far more attractive than Bonnie Parker.  ;) 

Sepiatone

I was thinking that as I wrote it. CLORIS was actually RUNNER UP to MISS AMERICA, whereas BONNIE couldn't do better than MISS CONGENIALITY at the MISS NORTH DAKOTA FINALS.

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