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Deadly Nightshade (1953)

 

An artist is arrested because he looks exactly like an escaped murderer. The escapee reads of it in the newspaper and manages to assume the artist's identity. This is perhaps not a good swap because the artist was involved in something much deeper.

One wonderful aspect of short, quickly-made, British movies of this period is the large stable of good actors available. Emrys Jones, Zena Marshall, Joan Hickson, Hector Ross, and Marne Maitland all slipped into their usual characters admirably. I did not find any outstanding performances but all were comfortably believable in their roles. I did find the script a little talky but that may be me as I have been experiencing that much lately. It does fill the hour quite nicely.

4.8/6

Available on Amazon Prime Video at no additional cost.

 

The Manchu Eagle Murder Caper Mystery (1975)

 

A chicken rancher with a degree from a mail-order detective school has his first client murdered in his office. Hilarity ensues.

I found this to be an above-average spoof of the hard-boiled detective genre but only because most such movies are quite horrible. The cast is reasonably respectable: Gabriel Dell, Will Geer, Anjanette Comer, Joyce Van Patten, Vincent Gardenia, Barbara Harris, Sorrell Booke, Dick Gautier, Jackie Coogan, Nita Talbot and Huntz Hall. They are all competent second-string actors but you will notice the lack of Oscar winners or performers consistently praised for their outstanding performances. There are no long scenes nor scenes with a great number of the actors. I somewhy had the impression that the scenes were shot on weekends by whichever performers were available that day and then edited together as one strings popcorn onto thread for Christmas decorations. 

I must admit that I was drawn in by a: "how much weirder is thing going to become" fascination but I must also admit that I might have bailed early if it was more than an eighty minute movie. The number of things crammed into the ending nearly made it worth watching.

5/10.6

Available on Amazon Prime Video at no additional cost.

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Fri/Sat are my weekend days so I watched THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO 7 2020 on Netflix in 2 parts. Pretty interesting because I'm an old hippy girl & MrTiki is in law enforcement. This was one movie I watched without making ANY comments!

The set up, screenplay, sets & costumes, editing & performances were outstanding. It definitely took you through the story, although of course, very biased. There were several references/insinuations of this being a "political" trial instead of a trial based on actual intentions of those charged. The parallels to todays demonstrations/riots is impossible to ignore.

It does show however, the division between more conservative protester Tom Hayden & the more hippie Abbie Hoffman & Jerry Rubin. It also shows how many attendants to protests are just there for the social scene, just like today. At least those on trial were serious about changing the direction of US government policies. This movie tries to capture the fear the conservative generation had of hippies and the Black Panthers, although as in all dissipating prejudices, difficult for a modern audience to accept.

One of my favorite lines spoken by Black Panther Bobby Seale, "We tried non violence like MLK wanted but it got us nowhere. Now we're going to try something different" which is identical to today's negative reaction of kneeling in protest quickly turning into street protests then rioting. While racial inequality and government misrepresentation continues exponentially 50 years later.

I recognized Frank Langella immediately as the corrupt judge, played perfectly-I hated him! I also recognized Michael Keaton who played the former Attny General who deemed this as a "political" trial. (and said, "I work for the PEOPLE, not the PRESIDENT" um, hear that Bill Barr?) I was blown away by Sacha Baron Cohen's portrayal of Abbie Hoffman. I did not recognize him (wasn't crazy about Borat) and he perfectly embodied the charactor: a well spoken long haired hippy that wanted to make a difference. I also liked the extreme comb overs both Kunstler & Dellinger wore. Every actor was pitch perfect. The portrayal of law enforcement was clear: a shot of officers removing their badges before attacking protestors was shown several times. Remember it's BASED on a true story, not a documentary, although I enjoyed the flashes of real news footage interspersed with actors.

The editing was really great, the story was easy to follow and moved along at a good pace. Worth seeing as an introduction of a moment in recent history.

220px-TrialChicago7poster.jpeg

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North West Frontier aka Flame Over India (1959)

Solid action yard, with great location filming. Kenneth More plays a British officer tasked with getting a young Hindu prince and his American governess (Lauren Bacall) to a safe British outpost in India. The only way is to use a beat up train, and so off they go with some assorted passengers. They fend off Muslims attacking at every turn. Oh, and one of the passengers may just want the Prince dead. Frying- pan-into-the-fire, nail-biting sequences aplenty, and a top-notch supporting cast, each of whom gets a chance to shine. Two hours of non-stop thrills. A gem.

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Last night, I watched 3 episodes of HBO's The Undoing.  For some reason, couldn't get 4 and 5 On Demand, but I can see them before the finale tonight.  Have mixed feelings.  It is intriguing and I want to find out who the killer is.  They let Hugh Grant retain his British accent; however, I don't if Nicole Kidman is trying to do an American accent (although her performance is good).  As a woman, I find the wardrobe as a reflection of a woman's sexuality interesting.  I also watched the beginning of Harrison Ford's Call of the Wild.  I like dogs and didn't care if Buck was computer-generated.  I read the book years ago but don't remember it.  Harrison Ford narrates the film but isn't in the bulk of it (and, yet again, I fell asleep at the end).

 

 

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9 minutes ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

Last night, I watched 3 episodes of HBO's The Undoing.  For some reason, couldn't get 4 and 5 On Demand, but I can see them before the finale tonight.  Have mixed feelings.  It is intriguing and I want to find out who the killer is.  They let Hugh Grant retain his British accent; however, I don't if Nicole Kidman is trying to do an American accent (although her performance is good).  As a woman, I find the wardrobe as a reflection of a woman's sexuality interesting.  I also watched the beginning of Harrison Ford's Call of the Wild.  I like dogs and didn't care if Buck was computer-generated.  I read the book years ago but don't remember it.  Harrison Ford narrates the film but isn't in the bulk of it (and, yet again, I fell asleep at the end).

 

 

I watched all the episodes of The Undoing so far.   Wasn't too sure after the first one if it was worth watching, but the second and later ones are better.  Have my thoughts on who did the killing, but probably wrong.  Haven't seen the finale yet.   Only wonder I have is what is with Kidman and the long coats and dresses.  Sure, it's New York and its sort of cold, but seems to wear them an awful lot.  It does tend to drag somewhat and probably would have made a better two or three episode series.

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40 minutes ago, ElCid said:

I watched all the episodes of The Undoing so far.   Wasn't too sure after the first one if it was worth watching, but the second and later ones are better.  Have my thoughts on who did the killing, but probably wrong.  Haven't seen the finale yet.   Only wonder I have is what is with Kidman and the long coats and dresses.  Sure, it's New York and its sort of cold, but seems to wear them an awful lot.  It does tend to drag somewhat and probably would have made a better two or three episode series.

It's curious about The Undoing because I was quite intrigued by the opening, but the later episodes feel a bit too restrained in sections, a bit too dry. and its a shame because the acting is quite good and I liked David E Kelleys writing on LA Law, Ally McBeal, The Practice, and Boston Legal.

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On 11/26/2020 at 10:53 AM, chaya bat woof woof said:

Last night I watched (re-watched) Tootsie.  I always felt that Dustin Hoffman's character mistreated Teri Garr (Sandy). 

I love Teri Garr in TOOTSIE. 

One of her many great lines from the movie and one that I would use if the right opportunity ever arose:

"We are not friends. I don't take this s*** from friends. Only from lovers."

kQ97I3d.png 

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12 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Fri/Sat are my weekend days so I watched THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO 7 2020 on Netflix in 2 parts. Pretty interesting because I'm an old hippy girl & MrTiki is in law enforcement. This was one movie I watched without making ANY comments!

The set up, screenplay, sets & costumes, editing & performances were outstanding. It definitely took you through the story, although of course, very biased. There were several references/insinuations of this being a "political" trial instead of a trial based on actual intentions of those charged. The parallels to todays demonstrations/riots is impossible to ignore.

It does show however, the division between more conservative protester Tom Hayden & the more hippie Abbie Hoffman & Jerry Rubin. It also shows how many attendants to protests are just there for the social scene, just like today. At least those on trial were serious about changing the direction of US government policies. This movie tries to capture the fear the conservative generation had of hippies and the Black Panthers, although as in all dissipating prejudices, difficult for a modern audience to accept.

One of my favorite lines spoken by Black Panther Bobby Seale, "We tried non violence like MLK wanted but it got us nowhere. Now we're going to try something different" which is identical to today's negative reaction of kneeling in protest quickly turning into street protests then rioting. While racial inequality and government misrepresentation continues exponentially 50 years later.

I recognized Frank Langella immediately as the corrupt judge, played perfectly-I hated him! I also recognized Michael Keaton who played the former Attny General who deemed this as a "political" trial. (and said, "I work for the PEOPLE, not the PRESIDENT" um, hear that Bill Barr?) I was blown away by Sacha Baron Cohen's portrayal of Abbie Hoffman. I did not recognize him (wasn't crazy about Borat) and he perfectly embodied the charactor: a well spoken long haired hippy that wanted to make a difference. I also liked the extreme comb overs both Kunstler & Dellinger wore. Every actor was pitch perfect. The portrayal of law enforcement was clear: a shot of officers removing their badges before attacking protestors was shown several times. Remember it's BASED on a true story, not a documentary, although I enjoyed the flashes of real news footage interspersed with actors.

The editing was really great, the story was easy to follow and moved along at a good pace. Worth seeing as an introduction of a moment in recent history.

220px-TrialChicago7poster.jpeg

I wrote about this movie earlier. It was really well done. I especially liked that they presented the fact that there were four distinct factions at the protests: The Yippies, the SDS, Dellinger's group and  the Black Panthers. The government prosecutors tried to prove that the violence that resulted from the protests was coordinated and planned by the defendants. It wasn't. Most historians believe it was actually instigated by the Chicago police force at the direction of Mayor Richard Daly.  As the movie mentions, Bobby Seal was supposedly only in Chicago for about four hours and Hayden and Hoffman were rarely on the same page.  I was involved in the anti-war movement while in college in the late 60s. Tom Hayden and Rennie Davis were heroes of mine back then.  THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO SEVEN accurately portrays a dark period of our history. Also, the parallels to what is happening now is a uncanny. My guess is that's why Aaron Sorkin made it.

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18 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

I love Teri Garr in TOOTSIE. 

One of her many great lines from the movie and one that I would use if the right opportunity ever arose:

"We are not friends. I don't take this s*** from friends. Only from lovers."

kQ97I3d.png 

For some reason my favorite moment in Tootsie is Teri Garr's scream when Dustin Hoffman does the big moment of truth in the soap opera. I've always been a big fan of Teri Garr, partly because she looks so much like a friend of mine.

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Last night I watched Bait as part of MOVIES-TV Sunday Noir.    Bait is a 1954 film produced,  directed by and also staring Hugo Haas.    It also features Celo Moore and John Agar.

In the early 50s Haas produced and directed 6  "B" films,   with Celo Moore for Columbia Pictures.    

The film wasn't very good.   It tried to create suspense but often fell flat.     MOVIES-TV has been showing many of these Haas \ Moore films;  E.g.  One Girl's Confession. 

   Cleo Moore.jpg

 

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The Inner Circle (1946)

 

A private detective needing a secretary has one walk in, announce that she now works for him and arranges his meeting with a mysterious new client. It comes as a surprise only to him that he quickly becomes the prime suspect in the murder of the client's husband and his new secretary trots out a very convincing but totally false alibi.

This is a quite wonderful little comedy murder mystery. It is very tight, the patter is enjoyable and it has more twists and turns than a thing which metaphorically has many twists and turns. The leads have reasonable chemistry and the supporting players all raise their roles far above stereotypes. It breaks convention in many ways: the police detective is amiable and fairly competent, the devious blonde is not a femme fatale and the hard-bitten gangster can go along with a joke. There is much ground to cover and many false leads to pursue for a one-hour movie and it does so admirably.

I recommend this highly to those who need a quick fix of lighthearted murder to get through their day. 

7.4/9

Available on Amazon Prime Video at no additional cost. 

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56 minutes ago, SansFin said:

The Inner Circle (1946)

 

A private detective needing a secretary has one walk in, announce that she now works for him and arranges his meeting with a mysterious new client. It comes as a surprise only to him that he quickly becomes the prime suspect in the murder of the client's husband and his new secretary trots out a very convincing but totally false alibi.

This is a quite wonderful little comedy murder mystery. It is very tight, the patter is enjoyable and it has more twists and turns than a thing which metaphorically has many twists and turns. The leads have reasonable chemistry and the supporting players all raise their roles far above stereotypes. It breaks convention in many ways: the police detective is amiable and fairly competent, the devious blonde is not a femme fatale and the hard-bitten gangster can go along with a joke. There is much ground to cover and many false leads to pursue for a one-hour movie and it does so admirably.

I recommend this highly to those who need a quick fix of lighthearted murder to get through their day. 

7.4/9

Available on Amazon Prime Video at no additional cost. 

Clearly a low point in the acting career of Ricardo Cortez.   But hey at 57 minutes,  even if one doesn't enjoy the film, they didn't waste a lot of their time. 

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50 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Clearly a low point in the acting career of Ricardo Cortez.   But hey at 57 minutes,  even if one doesn't enjoy the film, they didn't waste a lot of their time. 

It was a decade after he had had any true high points. He acquits himself very well here and I would not call this movie one of his low points. Who Is Hope Schuyler? (1942) and Tomorrow We Live (1942) were definitely low points. Stepping back and taking smaller roles was a wise move for him.

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17 hours ago, kingrat said:

For some reason my favorite moment in Tootsie is Teri Garr's scream when Dustin Hoffman does the big moment of truth in the soap opera. 

Yes, the reveal scene in TOOTSIE is one of the great movie scenes of all time and Teri Garr's reactions contribute to this greatness ---- first her scoff while watching Dorothy Michaels (as Emily Kimberly) on SOUTHWEST GENERAL and then later  her scream when  Dorothy (Emily) is revealed to be  Michael (Edward).

I love how seven characters have  distinct reactions to the moment of truth.

Brilliant comic writing, directing and acting.

 

"Does Jeff know?"

4TB5Vhl.png

  

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I just watched Joseph Losey's Secret Ceremony (1968).

According to the DVD commentary track, director Losey once stated that Robert Mitchum was pretty unfriendly throughout all of the shooting - to everyone. Perhaps he was staying in character in his way (as he is playing a rather creepy one) in this strange, beguiling film.

An interesting performance from Elizabeth Taylor as well in this one.

A rather dark movie, both theme-wise and cinematographically.

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Been lax over the last month or so on this thread have some catching up to do from September 17, 2020

 

Cet homme est dangereux (This Man Is Dangerous) (1953) French Riviera Noir

Poster%2BEddie.jpg


Eddie Constantine's second outing as Lemmy Caution. Directed by Jean Sacha. Written by Jacques Berland the adaptation, with additional dialog by Marcel Duhamel and based on Peter Cheyney's novel. Cinematography was by Marcel Weiss. Music by Jean Marion. 

This second Caution flick was directed by Jean Sacha who also shows some style but this one is lighter in atmosphere and in this film the back and forth dialogue between Eddie the various women and the gangsters is a bit snappier and more humorous. 

The film stars Eddie Constantine as Lemmy Caution, Colette Deréal  as Constance, Grégoire Aslan as Siégella, Claude Borelli as Miranda van Zelten, Luc Andrieux as Maurice, Michel Nastorg as Goyas.

The Story


Lemmy Caution escapes a Kansas Penitentiary. All points bulletin. All ports and airports. Use caution, this man is dangerous! We pick up the tale as Eddie is tooling down a French Riviera two lane. He's listening to another news bulletin this one in French. It describes Lemmy Caution as in France and driving a stolen 1950 Simca 8 Sport Cabriolet. Lemmy laughs. 

That evening at an apparently predetermined spot Lemmy pulls over and hoofs it down to a small cove with a small Chris-Craft riding on a shore secured line. 

On the beach in the bright moonlight he confronts his contact. Lemmy asks him if the American heiress Miranda van Zelten is on board. He's belligerent. Lemmy slaps him around, and takes the boat. He's heading out to a gambling yacht owned by a gangster named Goyas who works for head Riviera mobster Siegella. 

At the yacht, Lemmy sneaks aboard unseen to carry out his mission. 

I wasn't expecting much so was again pleasantly surprised. Poison Ivy the first Caution flick was directed by Bernard Borderie he showed a flair for on location shooting and the first film had a lot of atmosphere. This second Caution flick directed by Jean Sacha also shows some style but this one is lighter in atmosphere and in this film the back and forth dialogue between Eddie the various women and the gangsters is a bit snappier and more humorous. 

There is a good copy available on DVD from Video Dimensions with English Subs, 7/10  Review with some screencaps in the TCM boards Film Noir/Gangster pages.

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3 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Been lax over the last month or so on this thread have some catching up to do from September 17, 2020

 

Cet homme est dangereux (This Man Is Dangerous) (1953) French Riviera Noir

Poster%2BEddie.jpg


Eddie Constantine's second outing as Lemmy Caution. Directed by Jean Sacha. Written by Jacques Berland the adaptation, with additional dialog by Marcel Duhamel and based on Peter Cheyney's novel. Cinematography was by Marcel Weiss. Music by Jean Marion. 

This second Caution flick was directed by Jean Sacha who also shows some style but this one is lighter in atmosphere and in this film the back and forth dialogue between Eddie the various women and the gangsters is a bit snappier and more humorous. 

The film stars Eddie Constantine as Lemmy Caution, Colette Deréal  as Constance, Grégoire Aslan as Siégella, Claude Borelli as Miranda van Zelten, Luc Andrieux as Maurice, Michel Nastorg as Goyas.

The Story


Lemmy Caution escapes a Kansas Penitentiary. All points bulletin. All ports and airports. Use caution, this man is dangerous! We pick up the tale as Eddie is tooling down a French Riviera two lane. He's listening to another news bulletin this one in French. It describes Lemmy Caution as in France and driving a stolen 1950 Simca 8 Sport Cabriolet. Lemmy laughs. 

That evening at an apparently predetermined spot Lemmy pulls over and hoofs it down to a small cove with a small Chris-Craft riding on a shore secured line. 

On the beach in the bright moonlight he confronts his contact. Lemmy asks him if the American heiress Miranda van Zelten is on board. He's belligerent. Lemmy slaps him around, and takes the boat. He's heading out to a gambling yacht owned by a gangster named Goyas who works for head Riviera mobster Siegella. 

At the yacht, Lemmy sneaks aboard unseen to carry out his mission. 

I wasn't expecting much so was again pleasantly surprised. Poison Ivy the first Caution flick was directed by Bernard Borderie he showed a flair for on location shooting and the first film had a lot of atmosphere. This second Caution flick directed by Jean Sacha also shows some style but this one is lighter in atmosphere and in this film the back and forth dialogue between Eddie the various women and the gangsters is a bit snappier and more humorous. 

There is a good copy available on DVD from Video Dimensions with English Subs, 7/10  Review with some screencaps in the TCM boards Film Noir/Gangster pages.

Nice write up.    Hey, Joe,  I'm curious if you have seen many Celo Moore crime\noir films from the late 40s \ early 50s,  that were made by Columbia Pictures?

She was another so called blond bombshell,   that is largely forgotten but has a small cult following.

  

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This is slightly off topic, but I watched the conclusion of The Undoing with Hugh Grant and Nicole Kidman.  Now imagine you are Eddie Muller (sp?).  Here are the questions for you?

First:  some background... The Undoing is based on novel (no sequel).  Hugh and Nicole are a married couple with a young son.  Their son attends an elitist school in Manhattan; however, there is a Hispanic child who is their token nod to diversity.  The child's mother is murdered and Hugh's character, Jonathan, becomes the prime suspect.  The killer was revealed Sunday night.

So, here are the questions:

1) Putting yourself into Eddie's head (if you watch Noir Alley). what do you think he would say about it?

2) Now, if you were to turn it into a noir film (can use actors from the past), whom would you cast and would you do it in b&w?

 

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4 hours ago, chaya bat woof woof said:

This is slightly off topic, but I watched the conclusion of The Undoing with Hugh Grant and Nicole Kidman.  Now imagine you are Eddie Muller (sp?).  Here are the questions for you?

First:  some background... The Undoing is based on novel (no sequel).  Hugh and Nicole are a married couple with a young son.  Their son attends an elitist school in Manhattan; however, there is a Hispanic child who is their token nod to diversity.  The child's mother is murdered and Hugh's character, Jonathan, becomes the prime suspect.  The killer was revealed Sunday night.

So, here are the questions:

1) Putting yourself into Eddie's head (if you watch Noir Alley). what do you think he would say about it?

2) Now, if you were to turn it into a noir film (can use actors from the past), whom would you cast and would you do it in b&w?

 

1) My guess is that if it was a film done in the 40s Eddie would probably remark about how loopy the plot is but at the same time comment about its ability to draw one in and doubt what they have just seen even against one's best instincts.

2) Yes, black and white, and if we're going full 40s here, Olivia De Havilland for the Kidman part and Errol Flynn for the Grant part. Dean Stockwell would be the son. Have Gloria Grahame as the victim. And Sydney Greenstreet in the role of the father/grandfather.

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I watched "The Poseidon Adventure" Monday night as part of Shelley Winters' Star Of The Month treatment.  Overall, I liked the movie, especially listening to the bickering Stella Stevens and Ernest Borgnine go through as a 'happily married couple'.  For as much flak as she gets for playing annoying characters or over-the-top performances in her roles, Shelley Winters didn't even crack the Top 5 of annoying characters in this film!   I never really noticed or paid much attention to the interaction between Borgnine's character and Gene Hackman's in the past, but it hit me early on that their dialog was just a couple of guys on a continual 'roid rage.  Both guys did nothing but shout for 90% of their screen time, or so it seemed.  Carol Lynley's character should have been slapped and often.  Pamela Sue Martin's know-it-all kid brother should have been drowned.  In a smaller role, the guy who played the Purser was pretty annoying too, although, I would have been ticked off if some hot-shot former priest and current cruise passenger like Gene Hackman tried to tell me about the inner workings of a ship I had worked on for an extended period of time.   Naturally, the hottest chick in the picture, Stella Stevens, didn't make it to the rescue point.  It was at that moment I cried....  I give it a 7 out of 10.

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The Vanishing (2018)

 

A lighthouse crew of three men disappear because of a mixture of greed, stupidity and self-loathing.

The cinematography  of this movie is exceptional. The sweeping expanses contribute greatly to the sense of isolation. I feel it is a great shame that the script, direction and performances were as flat as a piece of film. The social dynamics range from men shouting at each other to men bashing each other with whatever weapon is at hand. There are no plot holes because there is virtually no plot but there are many issues which are never explained in any manner. The actual incident on which this movie is based lends itself well to all manner of speculation and supposition but no one from the screenwriter to the director to the lighting techs had the imagination to explore any of the interesting possibilities.

This is listed as a psychological drama. That is true only so far as none of the characters are mentally stable and it is as humourless as cleaning grout in an old bathroom.

2.3/39

Available on Amazon Prime Video at no additional cost. 

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This afternoon I saw "Suspense" with Belita & Barry Sullivan.  It was my first time watching it.  It was a pretty good movie.  Worth watching at least once IMO.  Not sure why it was called "Suspense" though.  I think a better title would have been "Paranoia".  I just didn't find it suspenseful.  Some great ice skating from Belita!  I never heard of her until now.  1946 movie.  I've been watching the Olympics since 2008.  I find it interesting how so many skating elements from back then are still used now.  I love watching ice skating!

Eugene Pallette, Belita & Barry Sullivan - Suspense (1946) | Golden age of  hollywood, Hollywood actor, Old hollywood

Lori

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"Crossing Delancey"

A lovely, timeless, late 1980s movie. Amy Irving is her usual chameleon self. Peter Riegert is great, as are all the leads and sub-leads-a wonderful cast, from the leads to the background players. Brilliantly written and directed, both by women, not at all common in those days. At least, seldom credited in the period from the beginning of the Hayes time to the turn of the last century. The soundtrack, especially the themes, is terrific, in an understated way.

Not my usual cup of Scotch, and I can see how people could easily love or hate this film.  I was rather ambivalent on the first viewing of the film. I wasn't terribly impressed on the second viewing, but as there was a third viewing, perhaps I was more impressed than I thought.

I reread a great deal and I watch movies over and over, often dozens of times, much like music. Listening to a piece of music or a good song many times isn't thought to be odd, yet rereading a book can gain one some odd looks and querying gazes.

"Crossing Delancey" doesn't seem to appear too often, but I'll try to catch it each time it's programmed. Like all my rereads and rewatches, I see something new, occasionally whole new subplots, each time I see it. Sometimes, I'll see little that's new, just the joy of hearing a song I love. Not something I experience with "Crossing Delancey". There is always something new.

Well worth the time.

-d-

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8 hours ago, doc burns said:

"Crossing Delancey"

A lovely, timeless 80s movie. Amy Irving is her usual chameleon self. Peter Riegert is great, as are all the leads and sub-leads. Brilliantly written and directed. The soundtrack, especially the themes, is terrific, in an understated way. Not my usual cup of Scotch, and I can see how people could easily love or hate this film.
I was rather ambivalent on the first viewing, I wasn't terribly impressed on the second, but, since there was a third, perhaps I was more impressed than I thought.
I reread a great deal and I watch movies over and over, often dozens of times, like music. Listening to a piece of music or a good song many times isn't thought to be odd, yet rereading a book can gain some odd looks and querying gazes.
"Crossing Delancey" doesn't seem to appear too often, but I'll try to catch it every time it's programmed. Like all my rereads and rewatches, I see something new, occasionally whole new subplots, each time. Sometimes, I'll see little new, just the joy of hearing a song I love. Not something that happens with "Crossing Delancey". There's always something new.

Yes, doc.  I find I catch something different in films I enjoy watching, even if it's for the hundredth time.  By the same token, some of my favorite films lose their luster after multiple viewings.  I don't know why this is.  Maybe it's because of the dated material in some of them?  I don't know.  When I first saw "The Deer Hunter", I was blown away by it.  As the years have gone by though, I like it less and less, and I can't really put my finger on it as to why.  

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