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14 hours ago, midwestan said:

I watched "The Poseidon Adventure" Monday night as part of Shelley Winters' Star Of The Month (snipped) the hottest chick in the picture, Stella Stevens, didn't make it to the rescue point.  It was at that moment I cried....  

That was THE BEST "review" this thread has seen in a long time, LOL. I've never seen it, can't watch movies about drowning.

Last night I sought out a childhood favorite, 1957's Animated Russian film, THE SNOW QUEEN. I was enthralled with this movie as a child, it was heavily rotated in the 60's on Saturday afternoon's kiddie movie. This classic film has quite a history, being dubbed & edited throughout the years.

This version was Paramount's 1959 English dubbed version with an insipid intro starring Art Linkletter tacked on. (FF) There was a Fleischer credit, but don't know what contribution that may be. 

I was pretty sad seeing this version on Tubi-TV, I really would like to see what the 1993 or 1995 restorations may look like. This was pretty much as I remembered it- with jolting jump cuts, possibly missing scenes to bring it to an hour long run time. Some night scenes were so dark, the TV just went black a few seconds-you could only see a pale gray shadow of something moving across the screen. And the lines were fuzzy and color was washed out.

Sandra Dee, Tommy Kirk, June Foray & Paul Frees all do well with the voices and the animation is spectacular-pretty Fleischer like, but more expressive and not as cloying.

b3CpeARoEGmUjjq2vuTfLMVHZT5.jpg

The lighting is terrific, especially the old crone in front of the fire near the end. The opening scene of the village bringing you into the story is remarkable. The animation of charactors is exuberant, although people were obviously rotographed. The back grounds were gorgeous & fantastical- the Ice Palace seems to have spotlights where you can see it's glittering transparency. Definitely right up there in quality to what Disney was doing at the time. The Snow Queen was not a nice charactor, reminding me of the Metropolis robot crossed with Malificent:

The_Snow_Queen_1957.jpg

This is worth seeing if you're into classic animated fairy tales. It's dark, scary and has a theme. I've got to find a restored version, since this was almost unwatchable.

tumblr_o0pa7fX6ZY1tvyli9o4_500.gif

It did not look like this, clip must be from restoration.

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Friendly Persuasion (1956)

Director William Wyler's thoughtful, sensitive screen adaption of Jessamyn West's novel about the Birdwells, an 1862 Quaker family, and their struggles to adhere to non violence principles as the Civil War is about to intrude upon their peaceful farm in southern Indiana was one of the prestige film releases of its year.

Leisurely paced, a little long at almost two hours and twenty minutes, it remains a warm and charming drama, chock full of humourous incidents. Dorothy McGuire is fine as the stern mother of the household, the most doctrinaire family member when it comes to adhering to Quaker traditions, while Gary Cooper is a delight as the easy going father. Cooper didn't age overly well during the '50s delivering a number of rather tired looking performances, at times. This is the one film of that decade, however, in which the actor re-discovered the little boy charm in himself, particularly in any of those scenes involving the Sunday morning buggy races. Cooper brings a subtlety to his facial responses in these humourous sequences that makes his performance most engaging.

However, it was Anthony Perkins, as the family's eldest son who has to wrestle with his conscience when it comes to fighting in the war, who was the one cast member to receive an Academy Award nomination (in support) for his sensitive performance. This was four years before Hitchcock's Psycho forever changed the actor's screen image.

Robert Middleton, often cast as villains, has the opportunity to play the laughter booming Sam Jordan, with whom Cooper indulges in the buggy races on the way to church. Middleton is solid in his role. Richard Eyer is a natural mischief maker as the family's youngest boy, ten year old young Jess. The film is introduced, in fact, with a highly amusing comedy sequence depicting the boy's latest chapter in his eternal conflict with Samantha, the family's pet goose who loves to hide in bushes and then rush out to bite the boy's legs or hind quarters,

Thrown into the film for broad comedic effect, too, is the wonderful Marjorie Main as the Widow Hudspeth, head of an all female household, with her three man hungry daughters. It's a delightful comedy sequence, as Cooper and Perkins visit their farm and Perkins finds himself the reluctant object of all young female attention.

There's a certain unreality about this production inasmuch as life on the Birdwell farm is presented as an idyllic existence. There's never a hint that farm life is difficult, as you see Cooper roaming through his large field of corn stalks. And when the rebels finally do ride in upon the farm, McGuire's response to them, while practical from the viewpoint of survival, could be seen by others as a form of collaboration. They are also the nicest collection of rebel soldiers you will ever see. Not even a hint that a shooting or rape could take place with them.

Probably my biggest complaint about the film after repeat viewings is in regard to its length. It could have used some judicious pruning in the editing room, possibly in regard to the scenes involving young love between the family's daughter (Phyllis Love) and a Union soldier (Mark Richmond). Those two actors, while both are quite adequate in their roles, are also the film's two least interesting characters.

Finally Dimitri Tiomkin contributes a lovely musical score to the film, which includes a gentle love song, Thee I Love, sung under the film's opening titles by Pat Boone.

Friendly Persuasion is available on DVD and frequently comes on TCM. It's a heart warming gem that deserves to be seen.

screenshot-896.png

3.5 out of 4

 

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17 hours ago, midwestan said:

I watched "The Poseidon Adventure" Monday night as part of Shelley Winters' Star Of The Month treatment.  Overall, I liked the movie, especially listening to the bickering Stella Stevens and Ernest Borgnine go through as a 'happily married couple'.  For as much flak as she gets for playing annoying characters or over-the-top performances in her roles, Shelley Winters didn't even crack the Top 5 of annoying characters in this film!   I never really noticed or paid much attention to the interaction between Borgnine's character and Gene Hackman's in the past, but it hit me early on that their dialog was just a couple of guys on a continual 'roid rage.  Both guys did nothing but shout for 90% of their screen time, or so it seemed.  Carol Lynley's character should have been slapped and often.  Pamela Sue Martin's know-it-all kid brother should have been drowned.  In a smaller role, the guy who played the Purser was pretty annoying too, although, I would have been ticked off if some hot-shot former priest and current cruise passenger like Gene Hackman tried to tell me about the inner workings of a ship I had worked on for an extended period of time.   Naturally, the hottest chick in the picture, Stella Stevens, didn't make it to the rescue point.  It was at that moment I cried....  I give it a 7 out of 10.

ther oddest thing about THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE (1973) is that it was directed by RONALD NEAME, who directed at least two movies which have some of the BEST ACTING I HAVE EVER SEEN- THE HORSE'S MOUTH (1958) and TUNES OF GLORY (1960)- and the acting in POSEIDON is, um, not some of the best I have ever seen.

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3 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ther oddest thing about THE POSEIDON ADVENTURE (1973) is that it was directed by RONALD NEAME, who directed at least two movies which have some of the BEST ACTING I HAVE EVER SEEN- THE HORSE'S MOUTH (1958) and TUNES OF GLORY (1960)- and the acting in POSEIDON is, um, not some of the best I have ever seen.

I loved "Tunes of Glory" when it was on TCM in September?  Could have been October.  Anyway, it was a good movie.  I've not seen "The Horse's Mouth", but it was on recently too.  Ben Mankiewicz said after "The Poseidon Adventure" aired that Shelley Winters garnered a Best Supporting Actress nomination for her part in that movie.  Even in the early 70's, Shelley still had enough talent and respect to earn accolades for the parts she played, no matter how unsavory the audience felt about her on-screen characters. 

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"Ad Astra" (2019)   Movie is boring as a long trip to Neptune.  Did come to some accurate conclusions...living on Mars will drive people to watch Earth views projected on the walls to prevent one from going bonkers on that dreary ball of rock and dust.

Yep there's no one out there.

Hate the be the guy to change the anti collision lights on that antenna.  Bet it still has bad cellphone reception.

sergei-sarichev-adastra-mrx-itw-03a.jpg?

 

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35 minutes ago, midwestan said:

I loved "Tunes of Glory" when it was on TCM in September?  Could have been October.  Anyway, it was a good movie.  I've not seen "The Horse's Mouth", but it was on recently too.  Ben Mankiewicz said after "The Poseidon Adventure" aired that Shelley Winters garnered a Best Supporting Actress nomination for her part in that movie.  Even in the early 70's, Shelley still had enough talent and respect to earn accolades for the parts she played, no matter how unsavory the audience felt about her on-screen characters. 

I really like THE HORSE’S MOUTH (1958) a lot. It features some great work by ALEC GUINESS (who wrote it) and KAY WALSH. Also a late role for ERNEST THESIGER. 
 

ive read in a couple places that a lot of people were expecting SHELLEY to win for POSEIDON and that EILEEN HECKERT’S win for BUTTERFLIES ARE FREE was a big upset. 
 

Had she won, Shelley would’ve entered into a very, very rare group of actors – as far as I know at the time it was only Walter Brennan and Katherine Hepburn - who had won *three* acting Oscars.
I think the flaws of the movie held her back though.

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I watched "Poseidon Adventure" Monday night also.  Great movie!  The last time I saw it, I caught maybe the last hour.  I've seen it many times & have the DVD.  But it's been a while since I last saw the whole movie.  So that was fun!  I love Irwin Allen.  By the way, for anyone that didn't know, the ship nurse was Irwin's wife Sheila.

I saw "Crossing Delancey" on TCM last night.  Great movie!  A month or so ago I spotted Amy Irving in a "Happy Days" episode.  She was easy to recognize IMO, even though the episode was dated 1975.  I don't mean to get "you know" on this, but to me, you gotta be Jewish to REALLY understand this movie.  It helps to know some Yiddish also.  I'm sure some people might think otherwise, but each time I watch this movie, I feel that way.

Lori

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16 hours ago, doc burns said:

"Crossing Delancey"

A lovely, timeless 80s movie. Amy Irving is her usual chameleon self. Peter Riegert is great, as are all the leads and sub-leads. Brilliantly written and directed. The soundtrack, especially the themes, is terrific, in an understated way. Not my usual cup of Scotch, and I can see how people could easily love or hate this film.
I was rather ambivalent on the first viewing, I wasn't terribly impressed on the second, but, since there was a third, perhaps I was more impressed than I thought.
I reread a great deal and I watch movies over and over, often dozens of times, like music. Listening to a piece of music or a good song many times isn't thought to be odd, yet rereading a book can gain some odd looks and querying gazes.
"Crossing Delancey" doesn't seem to appear too often, but I'll try to catch it every time it's programmed. Like all my rereads and rewatches, I see something new, occasionally whole new subplots, each time. Sometimes, I'll see little new, just the joy of hearing a song I love. Not something that happens with "Crossing Delancey". There's always something new.

A movie I know very well. I first saw it probably close to 8 or 9 years ago when I blind bought it for my father who like films involving Jewish heritage and culture. He hadn't seen it before either, but he loved it, and frequently asks to see it again. it's a lovely little gem of a film.

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10 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

That was THE BEST "review" this thread has seen in a long time, LOL. I've never seen it, can't watch movies about drowning.

Last night I sought out a childhood favorite, 1957's Animated Russian film, THE SNOW QUEEN. I was enthralled with this movie as a child, it was heavily rotated in the 60's on Saturday afternoon's kiddie movie. This classic film has quite a history, being dubbed & edited throughout the years.

This version was Paramount's 1959 English dubbed version with an insipid intro starring Art Linkletter tacked on. (FF) There was a Fleischer credit, but don't know what contribution that may be. 

I was pretty sad seeing this version on Tubi-TV, I really would like to see what the 1993 or 1995 restorations may look like. This was pretty much as I remembered it- with jolting jump cuts, possibly missing scenes to bring it to an hour long run time. Some night scenes were so dark, the TV just went black a few seconds-you could only see a pale gray shadow of something moving across the screen. And the lines were fuzzy and color was washed out.

Sandra Dee, Tommy Kirk, June Foray & Paul Frees all do well with the voices and the animation is spectacular-pretty Fleischer like, but more expressive and not as cloying.

b3CpeARoEGmUjjq2vuTfLMVHZT5.jpg

The lighting is terrific, especially the old crone in front of the fire near the end. The opening scene of the village bringing you into the story is remarkable. The animation of charactors is exuberant, although people were obviously rotographed. The back grounds were gorgeous & fantastical- the Ice Palace seems to have spotlights where you can see it's glittering transparency. Definitely right up there in quality to what Disney was doing at the time. The Snow Queen was not a nice charactor, reminding me of the Metropolis robot crossed with Malificent:

The_Snow_Queen_1957.jpg

This is worth seeing if you're into classic animated fairy tales. It's dark, scary and has a theme. I've got to find a restored version, since this was almost unwatchable.

tumblr_o0pa7fX6ZY1tvyli9o4_500.gif

It did not look like this, clip must be from restoration.

"Frozen" is loosely based on that film, I'm still waiting to see  "The Snow Queen".

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2 Days In The Valley (1996) San Fernando Valley Ensemble Noir

1996-two-days-in-the-valley-poster1.jpg

"You have one minute to decide the rest of your life..."


Another Nice Surprize!

Written and Directed by John Herzfeld. Cinematography by Oliver Wood and Music by Anthony Marinelli. Film Editing was by Jim Miller and Wayne Wahrman.

The film stars Danny Aiello (Once Upon A Time In America, Do the Right Thing, Léon: The Professional ) as Dosmo Pizzo, Greg Cruttwell as Allan Hopper, Jeff Daniels (The Lookout) as Alvin Strayer, Teri Hatcher as Becky Foxx, Glenne Headly (Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, Dick Tracy) as Susan Parish, Peter Horton as Roy Foxx, Marsha Mason as Audrey Hopper, Paul Mazursky (Blackboard Jungle) as Teddy Peppers, James Spader (Sex, Lies, and Videotape, Storyville) as Lee Woods, Eric Stoltz as Wes Taylor, Charlize Theron as Helga Svelgen, Keith Carradine (McCabe & Mrs. Miller, Emperor of the North, Pretty Baby) as Detective Creighton, Louise Fletcher (One Flew Over The  Cuckoo's Nest, Mulholland Falls ) as Evelyn and even a cameo by Classic Noir vet Lawrence Tierney as Older Man. 

It probably got lost in the aura of Pulp Fiction. The characterizations are crisp, well developed, the dialog is very knowing.  All the principals of the stellar cast perform admirably and the pacing is quick. A fun Neo Noir. 8/10

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12 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

2 Days In The Valley (1996) San Fernando Valley Ensemble Noir

"You have one minute to decide the rest of your life..."
Another Nice Surprize!

Written and Directed by John Herzfeld.

The director of this got caught up in the ME TOO scandal of 2016, a lot of ladies came out of the woodwork to allege some predatory behavior. Not commenting one way or the other on it, I'm just not sure he's still out there making movies ATM (although if MEL GIBSON gets to come back to the GROWN-UPS table, there's hope for anyone)

I'm so sorry that GLENN HEADLEY passed away. she was such a charming actress with a real vintage vibe.

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every now and then I READ SOMETHING that I think will appeal to CLASSIC FILM FANS, so I give it a mention in this thread.

OIP.8GIHk2N7ZFtI8DeWPkcx7gAAAA?pid=Api&r

I just re-read a book that I first read about 25 years ago(!) NOTHING MORE THAN MURDER by one of my favorite authors JIM THOMPSON.

there are very few authors who I have habitually RE-READ, I think RAYMOND CHANDLER is the only other, and even as a huge fan of his work, I will be the first to admit that THOMPSON'S CATALOGUE contains both some of the FINEST BOOKS I HAVE EVER READ and some of the worst.

I also recently wrote a screenplay based on one of his novels, so I have a strange sort of sense of "collaboration" with him that i don't with any other writers.

The fascinating thing about this book was that it is the story of a husband and wife who own AN INDEPENDENT MOVIE THEATER in a small town in 1949- and it goes into INTENSE, DEEP (and sometimes fascinating) detail about THE OUTRIGHT RACKET that is running an owning an independent theater. It is, apparently, a damned hard business to be honest in and there are any number of factors (from competitors to insurance men to film distributors and [especially] the projectionists union) that could make life A HELL for a theater owner.

it's an elaborate grift in and of itself.

the book follows "the dime-store Dostoyevsky" plot that THOMPSON often used, MURDER is like QUICKSAND- you get deeper and deeper until you wish you just hadn't done it in the first place.

you can see the twist at the end coming from a mile away, but it still works, and overall, not a bad way to kill a couple of hours.

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In Response to speedracer5:

I believe the lustre lack of a favourite film come's down to the language used, a specific type of acting which was exciting at the time, but failed to have staying power beyond it's time. Some experiments work, and some don't. The most serious problem some films have, in my opinion, is the subject matter. If a film uses a plotline that gives us a story that is timeless...one that would work no matter the time, or place, if done well, it's message will come through in any time. Many films, though, attempt to be very timely, using plots and storylines that work extremely well when released, but have little relevance beyond the sociological, political, and/or personal context within which they were written and shot. It's unfortunate, as many of these films, indeed, have themes that would be relevant in any time, and are worth researching the particular political or sociological context of the film's time and perspective to allow one to understand how the philosophy of the film is  conveyed through the time specific plot in which it's shot. I find that it is worth reading up on the times and people about which films  are shot, as the message, too often hidden within the specific characters and locations, are well worth discovering, once scraping off enough of the 'style'.  As an example, one group seriously guilty of this were the French, German, and especially, British "New Wave" writer/directors. Specifically, Tony Richardson's films have a timelessness to them if one takes the time to dig through all the "style". Perhaps it's worth revisiting some of those movies whose lustre has become lacking. It is probably still there, and worth exploring if if you're willing to find and remove the "style" from the "substance" them watch them again with new eyes. 

Thanks for the comment,

-d-

PS--sorry. still having a bit of trouble with navigation. I'll catch on relatively soon.   -d-

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12 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

2 Days In The Valley (1996) San Fernando Valley Ensemble Noir

1996-two-days-in-the-valley-poster1.jpg

I love this movie. There were several Tarantino type imitations around this time and I think this was by far the best. 

So many great characters and I loved how they all finally came together. My favorites are Jeff Daniels as the cop with anger issues and Eric Stolz as his more sensitive partner, they have great chemistry. And there is the best knockdown drag out cat fight I have ever seen in a movie between Teri Hatcher and Charlize Theron (she was at her most gorgeous here.)

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On 12/2/2020 at 5:36 AM, midwestan said:

Yes, doc.  I find I catch something different in films I enjoy watching, even if it's for the hundredth time.  By the same token, some of my favorite films lose their luster after multiple viewings.  I don't know why this is.  Maybe it's because of the dated material in some of them?  I don't know.  When I first saw "The Deer Hunter", I was blown away by it.  As the years have gone by though, I like it less and less, and I can't really put my finger on it as to why.  

midwestan--

I believe the lustre lack of a favourite film come's down to the language used, a specific type of acting which was exciting at the time, but failed to have staying power beyond it's time. Some experiments work, and some don't. The most serious problem some films have, in my opinion, is the subject matter. If a film uses a plotline that gives us a story that is timeless...one that would work no matter the time, or place, if done well, its message will come through in any time. Many films, though, attempt to be very timely, using plots and storylines that work extremely well when released, but have little relevance beyond the sociological, political, and/or personal context within which they were written and shot. It's unfortunate, as many of these films, indeed, have themes that would be relevant in any time, and are worth researching the particular political or sociological context of the film's time and perspective to allow one to understand how the philosophy of the film is  conveyed through the time specific plot in which it's shot. I find that it is worth reading up on the times and people about which films  are shot, as the message, too often hidden within the specific characters and locations, are well worth discovering, once scraping off enough of the 'style'.  As an example, one group seriously guilty of this were the French, German, and especially, British "New Wave" writer/directors. Specifically, Tony Richardson's films have a timelessness to them if one takes the time to dig through all the "style". Perhaps it's worth revisiting some of those movies whose lustre has become lacking. It is probably still there, and worth exploring if if you're willing to find and remove the "style" from the "substance" them watch them again with new eyes. 

Thanks for the comment,

-d-

PS--sorry. still having a bit of trouble with navigation. I'll catch on relatively soon.   -d-

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Saw DAWN PATROL yesterday afternoon for the first time.  Noticed something that gave me a bit of a start----

When the news came back that Niven's character's plane went down, Flynn went to a blackboard to erase the names off the board of those who didn't return from the mission.  When he was erasing Niven's character's name SCOTT off the board, I noticed the name under his was

SELFRIDGE

That caught my attention because  the SELFRIDGE National guard air force base in Harrison Township, MI,  on the shore of LAKE ST. CLAIR had been a defense mainstay there since 1917.  It was named after 1st Lieutenant  THOMAS E. SELFRIDGE, who died in a crash in 1908.  Never did fly for the British in WWI, and I wondered where the film maker came up with the name?  

Sepiatone

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3 hours ago, doc burns said:

In Response to speedracer5:

I believe the lustre lack of a favourite film come's down to the language used, a specific type of acting which was exciting at the time, but failed to have staying power beyond it's time. Some experiments work, and some don't. The most serious problem some films have, in my opinion, is the subject matter. If a film uses a plotline that gives us a story that is timeless...one that would work no matter the time, or place, if done well, it's message will come through in any time. Many films, though, attempt to be very timely, using plots and storylines that work extremely well when released, but have little relevance beyond the sociological, political, and/or personal context within which they were written and shot. It's unfortunate, as many of these films, indeed, have themes that would be relevant in any time, and are worth researching the particular political or sociological context of the film's time and perspective to allow one to understand how the philosophy of the film is  conveyed through the time specific plot in which it's shot. I find that it is worth reading up on the times and people about which films  are shot, as the message, too often hidden within the specific characters and locations, are well worth discovering, once scraping off enough of the 'style'.  As an example, one group seriously guilty of this were the French, German, and especially, British "New Wave" writer/directors. Specifically, Tony Richardson's films have a timelessness to them if one takes the time to dig through all the "style". Perhaps it's worth revisiting some of those movies whose lustre has become lacking. It is probably still there, and worth exploring if if you're willing to find and remove the "style" from the "substance" them watch them again with new eyes. 

Thanks for the comment,

-d-

PS--sorry. still having a bit of trouble with navigation. I'll catch on relatively soon.   -d-

I'm not sure what I said to elicit this response.  It seems that midwestan received the same response. Looking at Tony Richardson's filmography, I haven't seen any of these films... 

 

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Yesterday afternoon watched While The City Sleeps.  Good movie with stellar cast.  I've seen it before.

I recently saw Crossing Delancey and it reminded me of visiting The Lower East Side.

 

It is Thursday now.  Last night, I watched a cute Amy Schumer film called I Feel Pretty.  Michelle Williams was quite funny as a young head of a cosmetics company.  I liked the film because it shows that confidence plays a key role in how you perceive yourself and certain other people perceive you; however, it doesn't excuse you from treating your friends horribly.  It is another movie that touts women that aren't thin (but are beautiful inside).

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4 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I'm not sure what I said to elicit this response.  It seems that midwestan received the same response. Looking at Tony Richardson's filmography, I haven't seen any of these films... 

 

I'm sorry,  speedracer5. As I noted, I hadn't as yet learned the navigation, thus, what was meant to be a response to midwestan was  set to you. I think I now have things pretty much straightened out. midwestan has the response that should have been sent, and if you prefer, please simply ignore the comment mistakenly sent to you. If you don't mind, I'll continue to follow you. I hope this hasn't caused you too much trouble.

Take care and be well...-d-

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4 minutes ago, doc burns said:

I'm sorry,  speedracer5. As I noted, I hadn't as yet learned the navigation, thus, what was meant to be a response to midwestan was  set to you. I think I now have things pretty much straightened out. midwestan has the response that should have been sent, and if you prefer, please simply ignore the comment mistakenly sent to you. If you don't mind, I'll continue to follow you. I hope this hasn't caused you too much trouble.

Take care and be well...-d-

No problem.  

Thank you Doc.

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

I'm not sure what I said to elicit this response.  It seems that midwestan received the same response. Looking at Tony Richardson's filmography, I haven't seen any of these films... 

 

You have never seen Tom Jones or The Loved One ?

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1 minute ago, cigarjoe said:

I know you like comedies and Lucy, lol

I do like comedies and Lucy.  I don't know much about Tom Jones, I recorded it originally for Albert Finney during his memorial tribute.  I didn't know that it was a comedy.  I'll keep that in mind when I get around to seeing it. 

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