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35 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I do like comedies and Lucy.  I don't know much about Tom Jones, I recorded it originally for Albert Finney during his memorial tribute.  I didn't know that it was a comedy.  I'll keep that in mind when I get around to seeing it. 

Its a lot of fun, give it a watch.

 

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

No. I haven't.  I might have Tom Jones on my DVR.

TOM JONES gets a very unfair rap  as one of the lesser Oscar winners from being the best picture of an otherwise pretty lousy year- 1963.

It’s a lot of fun, and a really wonderfully directed film. It’s also hard to understand now, but it really is revolutionary in its style in that it was a period film that was bawdy, modern, innovative, and fast-moving.

I really do like it a lot.

i don’t get THE LOVED ONE. I’m not saying it’s a bad movie, I’m not even saying I didn’t like it. I just don’t get it.

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i don’t get THE LOVED ONE. I’m not saying it’s a bad movie, I’m not even saying I didn’t like it. I just don’t get it.

Its  like a picaresque Film Noir Comedy about the Funeral Industry. Its got some John Waters vibes in it.

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On 12/2/2020 at 9:38 AM, Lori Ann said:

  I don't mean to get "you know" on this, but to me, you gotta be Jewish to REALLY understand this movie.  It helps to know some Yiddish also.  I'm sure some people might think otherwise, but each time I watch this movie, I feel that way.

Lori

Perhaps it has something to do with linguistics, (kind of my area), but even a Canadian Scot like myself can understand this movie. I've always had a love of Yiddish, but without even a touch, there are many traditions that allow one to feel home in the film. Check into the Irish Babhdóir, the matchmaker, Eire being a country of small counties, there is a singles festival in the town of Lisdoonvarna in the West Lands, (we have similar times in Scotland, often during a cèilidh, and little helps men and women find each other like dancing).  Visiting John Wayne and Maureen O'Hara in John Ford's "The Quiet Man", (possibly the least "Duke" of Wayne's films), might give you a feeling of heym outside of heym. People are people wherever they're from, especially in New York, where, although traditions are held dear, space is also dear and it only takes a generation or two before they begin to meld. Generally, women have to meet men, (and vice versa), no matter where they're from, and if it's across the world, or across Delancey Street, (Delancey being an Irish name of French origin), a good man should find a fine woman, whatever barriers the "helping hands" put in the way--(a girl's gotta make a living, after all, and I've got such a book of good men).

Just my tuppence, -d-

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"The Trouble With Harry" was an interesting movie.  Not like any other Hitchcock movie I ever saw.  It had Jerry Mathers, about 2 years before "Leave It To Beaver".  The opening credits had "Introducing Shirley MacLaine".

Alfred Hitchcock Reveals “The Trouble with Harry” | The Hitchcock Report

Lori

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3 hours ago, Lori Ann said:

"The Trouble With Harry" was an interesting movie.  Not like any other Hitchcock movie I ever saw.

Truly an odd Hitchcock flick. Not a bad film, just a strange one from Hitch. I've always wondered how much Joan had to do with that one.

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On 11/4/2020 at 4:09 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

sue me, but as a great admirer of terrible acting, I have to give props to the GAME CHANGING PERFORMANCE OF SOFIA COPPOLA in GODFATHER III. 
It is a thing of wonderful, terrible, magnificence.

 

 

SPOILER

She can’t even die convincingly.

I'm bringing this back up because The Godfather Part III is back in the news because Francis Ford Coppola just trimmed a few minutes from it (only about 5 minutes) and rearranged a few scenes. He cast his daughter in the role last minute when Winona Ryder dropped out, but has since said that he would have directed Winona to act the same way Sofia did in the finished film.... so his daughter took the fall and Ryder got out of what would have likely been a career killing event for her. Indeed, Sofia received a bigger voting share at the Razzies that year (opposite Roseanne Barr's voice in Look Who's Talking Too, Ally Sheedy in Betsy's Wedding, Julie Newmar in Ghosts Can't Do It, and Kim Cattrall in The Bonfire of the Vanities) than anybody else in their history. And yet, maybe because I had heard repeatedly growing up about how bad her performance was growing up, I thought she was better than my rock-bottom reputation going in.

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I feel bad. Not about my comments about Sofia, but because Godfather III is the only one of the trilogy that I have seen.


Seriously.

It’s a gorgeous looking movie. And plot wise I recall it actually being all right.

I’ve just never found time for part one or part two. Also movies about the mafia bore me.

also. That unfortunate perm that Diane Keaton has in part III

(Who told you that was a good idea Diane? They’re not your friend Diane. In fact, They hate you.)

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20 hours ago, doc burns said:

Truly an odd Hitchcock flick. Not a bad film, just a strange one from Hitch. I've always wondered how much Joan had to do with that one.

Have you watched: Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941)? It is even more un-Hitchcock-ian.

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On 12/2/2020 at 9:58 AM, TomJH said:

Friendly Persuasion (1956)

Director William Wyler's thoughtful, sensitive screen adaption of Jessamyn West's novel about the Birdwells, an 1862 Quaker family, and their struggles to adhere to non violence principles as the Civil War is about to intrude upon their peaceful farm in southern Indiana was one of the prestige film releases of its year.

Leisurely paced, a little long at almost two hours and twenty minutes, it remains a warm and charming drama, chock full of humourous incidents. Dorothy McGuire is fine as the stern mother of the household, the most doctrinaire family member when it comes to adhering to Quaker traditions, while Gary Cooper is a delight as the easy going father. Cooper didn't age overly well during the '50s delivering a number of rather tired looking performances, at times. This is the one film of that decade, however, in which the actor re-discovered the little boy charm in himself, particularly in any of those scenes involving the Sunday morning buggy races. Cooper brings a subtlety to his facial responses in these humourous sequences that makes his performance most engaging.

However, it was Anthony Perkins, as the family's eldest son who has to wrestle with his conscience when it comes to fighting in the war, who was the one cast member to receive an Academy Award nomination (in support) for his sensitive performance. This was four years before Hitchcock's Psycho forever changed the actor's screen image.

Robert Middleton, often cast as villains, has the opportunity to play the laughter booming Sam Jordan, with whom Cooper indulges in the buggy races on the way to church. Middleton is solid in his role. Richard Eyer is a natural mischief maker as the family's youngest boy, ten year old young Jess. The film is introduced, in fact, with a highly amusing comedy sequence depicting the boy's latest chapter in his eternal conflict with Samantha, the family's pet goose who loves to hide in bushes and then rush out to bite the boy's legs or hind quarters,

Thrown into the film for broad comedic effect, too, is the wonderful Marjorie Main as the Widow Hudspeth, head of an all female household, with her three man hungry daughters. It's a delightful comedy sequence, as Cooper and Perkins visit their farm and Perkins finds himself the reluctant object of all young female attention.

There's a certain unreality about this production inasmuch as life on the Birdwell farm is presented as an idyllic existence. There's never a hint that farm life is difficult, as you see Cooper roaming through his large field of corn stalks. And when the rebels finally do ride in upon the farm, McGuire's response to them, while practical from the viewpoint of survival, could be seen by others as a form of collaboration. They are also the nicest collection of rebel soldiers you will ever see. Not even a hint that a shooting or rape could take place with them.

Probably my biggest complaint about the film after repeat viewings is in regard to its length. It could have used some judicious pruning in the editing room, possibly in regard to the scenes involving young love between the family's daughter (Phyllis Love) and a Union soldier (Mark Richmond). Those two actors, while both are quite adequate in their roles, are also the film's two least interesting characters.

Finally Dimitri Tiomkin contributes a lovely musical score to the film, which includes a gentle love song, Thee I Love, sung under the film's opening titles by Pat Boone.

Friendly Persuasion is available on DVD and frequently comes on TCM. It's a heart warming gem that deserves to be seen.

screenshot-896.png

3.5 out of 4

 

My favorite scene in this film is when Dorothy McGuire sleeps in the barn because she's angry about the purchase of an organ.  Coop goes into the barn with a blanket to reconcile with her and then end up spending the night.  The next morning, a neighbor comes and visits and Cooper is plucking straw from his hair and shirt.  Yes, there is sex after marriage and grown children -- and it can be suggested with great charm and humor.

 

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8 minutes ago, rosebette said:

My favorite scene in this film is when Dorothy McGuire sleeps in the barn because she's angry about the purchase of an organ.  Coop goes into the barn with a blanket to reconcile with her and then end up spending the night.  The next morning, a neighbor comes and visits and Cooper is plucking straw from his hair and shirt.  Yes, there is sex after marriage and grown children -- and it can be suggested with great charm and humor.

 

Yes, it's the suggestion of the sex in this scene in Friendly Persuasion that brings it so much charm. Cooper and McGuire are in the barn. Cooper looks at the straw mattress upon which she is sitting and tests its softness with his foot. That is all you see. Night changes to day as we look at the barn and Coop and McGuire are now returning to their house from it. Coop merely says to her, "Let's go back some time" in reference to the barn. We know what happened, two adults still capable of being excited by one another in their middle years and having sex, but our noses aren't rubbed in it. Our imaginations fill in the gaps. Love it.

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Cave Women on Mars (2008)

 

Spoiler: there are no caves in the movie.

This not the oddest movie which I have watched but it does rank fairly highly.

I had ambivalent thoughts concerning several aspects after watching it. I believed the picture quality was preternaturally crisp for a 1950s film aspiring to be considered a B-movie. I believed also that I had discovered the source of Captain Kirk's infamous speech defect because both the Director of Star Command and the Captain of the rocket freeze for a moment before delivering a hopefully dramatic word. There are several other instances of apparent anachronisms. 

Then I noticed in the IMDb listing that it was made in 2008. Then I learned that Christopher R. Mihm has made a career since 2006 of writing, producing and directing bad 1950s sci-fi and horror movies. He seems to have formed a collective of people willing to build sets, do makeup and be stagehands as well as act. That he has made fourteen movies in fourteen years clearly shows that either he knows his audience or is willing to burn through a major lottery win in a quest to go down in history as a clone made from splicing together the DNA of Ed Wood, William Castle and Roger Corman.

I found this movie borders on "so bad it's good" territory but does not firmly cross the line.

5/10  

 

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2 hours ago, SansFin said:

I found this movie borders on "so bad it's good" territory but does not firmly cross the line.

So, "so bad it could've been good if only it had been a little bit worse".

I hate when that happens.

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The Last Chance (1945)

Absorbing tale of three soldiers (two British, one American), who have escaped from prison camps and are trying to reach Switzerland. Along the way they pick up several refugees who make the trip with them. Filmed in Switzerland, the scenes in the Alps are both beautiful and heartbreaking, as the small group make their way through the snow attempting to reach the neutral country.

The three lead actors had actually escaped from prison camps; the rest of the cast consists mostly of locals, and a few professional actors. The film is subtitled in various scenes, since the actors speak Italian, French, and German. Among the professionals, Theresa Giehse is a standout as the German refugee, who, early in the film, sees her husband taken away by train to a concentration camp.

The version I saw on Amazon Prime was about 100 minutes, which corresponds with the running time when the film played in New York City in 1945. There appears to be a longer version, by about ten minutes, which might explain why the version I saw seemed choppy in spots.

This film was the first recipient of the Golden Globe award for “the best film promoting international understanding.” Later recipients included The Day the Earth Stood Still, The Diary of Anne Frank, and To Kill a Mockingbird.

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13 hours ago, rosebette said:

My favorite scene in this film is when Dorothy McGuire sleeps in the barn because she's angry about the purchase of an organ.  Coop goes into the barn with a blanket to reconcile with her and then end up spending the night.  The next morning, a neighbor comes and visits and Cooper is plucking straw from his hair and shirt.  Yes, there is sex after marriage and grown children -- and it can be suggested with great charm and humor.

 

I love Friendly Persuasion, it's always been on my list of my favorite 10 movies. Besides the wonderful acting by everyone, the beautiful theme song Pat Boone sings, it's a beautiful film to look at. Filmed in such a tender, lovely way. the story is so sweet and touching. Nominated for 6 Oscars and I wish it had won some of those awards.

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07-lee-tracy-554x404.jpgTHINK STRAW BOATERS'LL EVER MAKE A COMEBACK?

 

I watched THE BLESSED EVENT (1932) this morning.

I've seen it before, and I even tried digging for my review in the forum, but couldn't locate it. I have the feeling that my opinion this time around was the same as it was the first- it's an interesting, but un-even movie; and a much better earlier version SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS [1957]- (sorry, I want to like SWEET SMELL, but I do not. At all.)

I'm a sucker for any movie where people talk a mile a minute, preferably into CANDLESTICK PHONES

(I think the screenplay to this was 173 pages, but it's barely over an hour. THE DIALOGUE IS THAT FAST. There were a couple scenes where I half-expected them to start passing RATTLESNAKES because they were a couple beats away from OUTRIGHT SPEAKING IN TONGUES.

this film TOTTERS ON THE BRINK OF PROTO FILM NOIR, I wish it had GONE THERE and embraced the darker aspects of the story. My viewing experience was greatly enhanced by EDDIE MULLER AND HIS GUEST, A Pre-Code historian who knew his stuff. I have to say that I agree that the ELECTRIC CHAIR SCENE is the highlight of the movie, it's one HELL of a performance from LEE TRACY

I felt bad for DICK POWELL, his role was meant I think to subtly lampoon THE SINGING CROONERS OF THE TIME, but it's too subtle, and shallow, a role for someone of his talent. (I like DICK POWELL, I know a lot of you don't. for those of you who don't, this film sure ain't gonna change that.)

an old lady says "I'LL BE DAMNED" and yet there is a SPLICE when LEE TRACY'S CHARACTER "SWEARS TO GOD"- the word GOD is cut out and it's noticeable (and weird.)

there are a lot of PRECODES I like better than this one, nonetheless, this is a fascinator.

WARNING: THERE ARE  A COUPLE ETHNIC SLURS IN THIS

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

07-lee-tracy-554x404.jpgTHINK STRAW BOATERS'LL EVER MAKE A COMEBACK?

 

I watched THE BLESSED EVENT (1932) this morning.

I've seen it before, and I even tried digging for my review in the forum, but couldn't locate it. I have the feeling that my opinion this time around was the same as it was the first- it's an interesting, but un-even movie; and a much better earlier version SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS [1957]- (sorry, I want to like SWEET SMELL, but I do not. At all.)

I'm a sucker for any movie where people talk a mile a minute, preferably into CANDLESTICK PHONES

(I think the screenplay to this was 173 pages, but it's barely over an hour. THE DIALOGUE IS THAT FAST. There were a couple scenes where I half-expected them to start passing RATTLESNAKES because they were a couple beats away from OUTRIGHT SPEAKING IN TONGUES.

this film TOTTERS ON THE BRINK OF PROTO FILM NOIR, I wish it had GONE THERE and embraced the darker aspects of the story. My viewing experience was greatly enhanced by EDDIE MULLER AND HIS GUEST, A Pre-Code historian who knew his stuff. I have to say that I agree that the ELECTRIC CHAIR SCENE is the highlight of the movie, it's one HELL of a performance from LEE TRACY

I felt bad for DICK POWELL, his role was meant I think to subtly lampoon THE SINGING CROONERS OF THE TIME, but it's too subtle, and shallow, a role for someone of his talent. (I like DICK POWELL, I know a lot of you don't. for those of you who don't, this film sure ain't gonna change that.)

an old lady says "I'LL BE DAMNED" and yet there is a SPLICE when LEE TRACY'S CHARACTER "SWEARS TO GOD"- the word GOD is cut out and it's noticeable (and weird.)

there are a lot of PRECODES I like better than this one, nonetheless, this is a fascinator.

WARNING: THERE ARE  A COUPLE ETHNIC SLURS IN THIS

I think this is your previous writeup...

 

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Too Late for Tears (1949)

 

A classic question for discussion is: "What would you do if you found a bag full of cash?" This movie shows an amoral woman's answer: do anything and everything  to keep it.

I am sad to say that the list of things she does are all spoilers. Suffice it to say that it is a vicious spiral of increasingly heinous crimes.

This is a tight noir and Lizabeth Scott embraces her role.

8/10

 

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1 minute ago, SansFin said:

Too Late for Tears (1949)

 

A classic question for discussion is: "What would you do if you found a bag full of cash?" This movie shows an amoral woman's answer: do anything and everything  to keep it.

I am sad to say that the list of things she does are all spoilers. Suffice it to say that it is a vicious spiral of increasingly heinous crimes.

This is a tight noir and Lizabeth Scott embraces her role.

8/10

 

Spoiler alert for Too Late for Tears:

Unlike films like Treasure of the Sierra Madre,   in Too Late for Tears,     it isn't the loot (cash, gold,   fame,,,  etc...), that makes the main character descend down a dark hole and  perform amoral acts.    In Treasure Bogie starts out as a stand-up guy;  E.g. he could have taken all of the cash from the business man that tried to cheat him but only took what he was owned.    Scott's character instead has a history of being no good,  and that history comes back to nail her in the end.     One can have some sympathy for Bogie at the end of Treasure;  it was gold that causes him to go off the deep end.     Scott's character was hard from start to finish (with her just upping the ante as the story unfolds).     

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THANK YOU VERY MUCH TXFILMFAN!

here is an edited version of MY review from two years ago:

DECEMBER 18, 2018

I caught most of BLESSED EVENT (1932) last night. It is an uneven, but fascinating, pre-code starring LEE TRACY as a verrrrry thinly disguised carbon copy of Walter Winchell. Reminded me a lot of FIVE STAR FINAL From the previous year, which is one of my favorite films of the 30sI’m sure I won’t remember everything, but there were prohibition jokes, slang galore, 150 words of dialogue a minute, a couple of racial slurs, lots of NU window**– the title refers to Tracy's columnists coy way of saying someone’s been knocked up – and even a reference to then-President Herbert Hoover.

The story ended up wandering quite a bit, I think they were making it up as they went along, but the cast is just superb. It’s a Who’s Who of pre-code Warner Bros. players under the snappy direction of Roy Del Ruth, and even though the story maybe stumbles, it keeps moving as it stumbles.

I really do love Lee Tracy, . He spits out the dialogue as fast as Barbara Stanwyck’s typewriter,

I really tend to not like actors who are dramatic showboats, but dammit Tracy puts on one hell of a boat show.

Quite frankly had the film been a little bit more focused, he should’ve gotten an Oscar nomination.

I’m very sorry Lee Tracy’s career was derailed, even if it was his own damn fault. We really lost out on some great performances that he could’ve given throughout the 1940s and 50s.

Can you imagine him as FATHER FLANNIGAN in BOY'S TOWN? He would’ve had those kids running numbers and shaking down suckers for as far as the eye can see.

 

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tomorrow/tonight's feature is either an encore or a repeat of TOMORROW IS ANOTHER DAY from 1951 with RUTH ROMAN and STEVE COCHRAN. I remember it being pretty good, a dash of THIEVES LIKE US and not entirely unlike (a much darker) IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT.

I think EDDIE has a poster for this in his study....

edit- oops, i thought this was the NOIR ALLEY THREAD. I'LL LEAVE IT UP ANYWAY AS AN FYI

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1 hour ago, SansFin said:

Too Late for Tears (1949)

 

A classic question for discussion is: "What would you do if you found a bag full of cash?" This movie shows an amoral woman's answer: do anything and everything  to keep it.

I am sad to say that the list of things she does are all spoilers. Suffice it to say that it is a vicious spiral of increasingly heinous crimes.

This is a tight noir and Lizabeth Scott embraces her role.

8/10

 

One of the interesting things about this film is how a wise guy who thinks he's pretty tough (Dan Duryea) turns out to be not nearly as tough or cold blooded as a woman with whom he becomes obsessed. As he becomes increasingly dependent upon alcohol in his downward spiral his character turns from nasty to pathetic, almost to the point of audience sympathy for him at the very end.

Too Late for Tears may be Lizabeth Scott's finest moment in the movies but it also has one of the best performances of Dan Duryea's career. He brings a lot to this noir.

Too+Late+for+Tears+3.jpg

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