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16 hours ago, kingrat said:

Speedy, I'm on the same page as you and rosebette about Miriam Hopkins. I saw her first in The Old Maid and Old Acquaintance and thought  she was hammy, a wannabe who couldn't compete with Bette. Then I saw her pre-Code films. Great in comedy (Trouble in Paradise, Design for Living). Great in drama (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, The Story of Temple Drake). A star who holds her own against other stars. Parting ways with Paramount did not turn out to be a good move.

MIRIAM HOPKINS is one of those GOLDEN AGE STARS that I have never read a particularly nice word about anywhere [see also: LAKE, VERONICA and BEERY, WALLACE]

she adopted a little boy who she loved very much, and referred to as "MY LITTLE MAN", and she was very liberal, but outside of that, the consensus from, OH, EVERYONE WHO EVER KNEW HER seems to be that she was AT ALL TIMES

starring AS:

MIRIAM HOPKINS  in

MIRIAM HOPKINS: THE STORY OF A WOMAN,

featuring MIRIAM HOPKINS

and introducing MIRIAM HOPKINS as HERSELF.

Personally, I respect that, and it makes me like her all the more. I think the first movie I saw her in was BECKY SHARP (1935)- back in the 1990s on AMC before AMC went to ****.

It is a MARVELOUS PERFORMANCE, just a real work of great technical ACTING and to see it is to view MIRIAM HOPKINS in a whole new way.

 

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17 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

the film was made in 1981 and the fashion in it has a slight 80's vibe-

I thought exactly that when you posted this photo:

21 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

OIP.U0MvmoVi3WlXJM3ceKjykwHaLO?pid=Api&r

 

12 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I do think that behind "Jayne Mansfield" the character, the real Jayne Mansfield was a savvy business woman (she had to have been to capitalize on her "brand") and a very kind, lovely person.  In The Burglar, we get to see Jayne Mansfield before she was "Jayne Mansfield" and I thought she was very pretty here and a good actress.  I actually thought she looked better dressed down in this film, than she does when she's playing "Jayne Mansfield."

Yeah, when everyone compared MADONNA to Marilyn, I always countered with Madonna is the modern Jayne Mansfield.

MM was childlike & vulnerable with a naieve idea of stardom. Madonna is more like Mansfield, smart enough to know how to use the system to gain fame with exploitation above talent. In Mansfield's case, no one WANTED her for her talents, so she used what she could to gain fame fastest in a male oriented business. Mansfield's a perfect example of "selling out", making her career a tragedy.  

A tragedy to all modern women in business wanting to be taken seriously for their talent.  (So glad Madonna retired, smart girl. Her lewd, exploitation work set women back decades)

I agree, Jayne was a very good actress & perfectly beautiful. Her beauty was more exceptional seen in normal, everyday dress & make up, she did not benefit from embellishment-best left for the plain gals who need it!

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I would like to post one more thing about....

EVIL UNDER THE SUN

(I'M SORRY! I'M SORRY!)

But the soundtrack is GREAT, and I know we have some music/soundtrack/arrangement fans here. posted below is a great 15 minute SUITE of music from the film, all intermittent pieces of COLE PORTER songs rather cleverly worked into the film (ie I CONCENTRATE ON YOU as POIROT ponder the mystery and MY HEART BELONGS TO DADDY when MRS. REDFERN reveals her true nature at the end of the film)

I also HIGHLY RECOMMEND LISTENING TO THE PART THAT BEGINS AT 12:00 EXACTLY, a SUPERB arrangement of JUST ONE OF THOSE THINGS (another clever, clever touch) that begins as JANE BIRKIN descends the hotel steps.

 

 

 

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I watched "Kiss Me Kate" this afternoon for the first time.  It was great!  Must have had 20 songs!  I recognized some parts from "That's Dancing".  The movie had some great Ann Miller dancing!  I love watching her dance!!

I loved this part...

Kiss Me Kate (1953) – FilmFanatic.org

I think Ann Miller is one of the prettiest actresses around.  She began dancing at 5.  She was discovered at 13 by Lucille Ball.  She said she was 18.  "Kiss Me Kate" also starred Kathryn Grayson.  Most of the movie was shown on stage showing "The Taming of the Shrew" being acted out.  Kathryn Grayson, with a red wig & heavy makeup, looked like Eleanor Parker.

When Cole Porter Met William Shakespeare… – Indiana University Cinema

Lori

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1 hour ago, Lori Ann said:

I watched "Kiss Me Kate" this afternoon for the first time.  It was great!  Must have had 20 songs!  I recognized some parts from "That's Dancing".  The movie had some great Ann Miller dancing!  I love watching her dance!!

I loved this part...

Kiss Me Kate (1953) – FilmFanatic.org

I think Ann Miller is one of the prettiest actresses around.  She began dancing at 5.  She was discovered at 13 by Lucille Ball.  She said she was 18.  "Kiss Me Kate" also starred Kathryn Grayson.  Most of the movie was shown on stage showing "The Taming of the Shrew" being acted out.  Kathryn Grayson, with a red wig & heavy makeup, looked like Eleanor Parker.

When Cole Porter Met William Shakespeare… – Indiana University Cinema

Lori

I really liked Kiss Me Kate.  I just watched it for the first time early last year?? Maybe the year before? I don't even remember now.  It was fairly recent, however.  Normally, I'm not a fan of Kathryn Grayson.  I find her singing to be very shrill and unpleasant to listen to.  However, in this film, she seemed to have toned it down a smidge, or perhaps it was just less annoying in this movie.  I loved Ann Miller's "Too Darn Hot" number.  I especially loved her scenes with Tommy Rall, Bobby Van, and Bob Fosse.   I loved Howard Keel in this movie, and there was so much more of him to see in this film o.O 

While I haven't seen Taming of the Shrew performed in the manner in which Shakespeare intended, I have seen 10 Things I Hate About You, also based on 'Shrew.'  It was easy to draw parallels between the characters in that film and the characters in 'Kate' and I was able to keep straight who was who and what was happening in the play within the film. 

I actually thought that Kathryn looked great in her "play wig" and costumes.  I found her "real-life" blonde wig to be very unflattering.   

I loved the costumes in this film and I enjoyed how colorful it was.  This was a great movie, one that I had put off seeing for such a long time. 

Ann is really great Stage Door that she made with Lucy when she was 14.  It is fascinating to see her holding her own with the likes of Lucy, Ginger Rogers, Eve Arden, and Katharine Hepburn. 

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11 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I really liked Kiss Me Kate.  I just watched it for the first time early last year?? Maybe the year before? I don't even remember now.  It was fairly recent, however.  Normally, I'm not a fan of Kathryn Grayson.  I find her singing to be very shrill and unpleasant to listen to.  However, in this film, she seemed to have toned it down a smidge, or perhaps it was just less annoying in this movie.  I loved Ann Miller's "Too Darn Hot" number.  I especially loved her scenes with Tommy Rall, Bobby Van, and Bob Fosse.   I loved Howard Keel in this movie, and there was so much more of him to see in this film o.O 

While I haven't seen Taming of the Shrew performed in the manner in which Shakespeare intended, I have seen 10 Things I Hate About You, also based on 'Shrew.'  It was easy to draw parallels between the characters in that film and the characters in 'Kate' and I was able to keep straight who was who and what was happening in the play within the film. 

I actually thought that Kathryn looked great in her "play wig" and costumes.  I found her "real-life" blonde wig to be very unflattering.   

I loved the costumes in this film and I enjoyed how colorful it was.  This was a great movie, one that I had put off seeing for such a long time. 

Ann is really great Stage Door that she made with Lucy when she was 14.  It is fascinating to see her holding her own with the likes of Lucy, Ginger Rogers, Eve Arden, and Katharine Hepburn. 

I prefer the stage version, but the film is decent.  A few songs were lost in the translation (common for stage to film transfers) and some of the PG language from the play was excised or changed, and parts were modified to take advantage of Miller's dancing abilities  (e.g., Too Darn Hot opens Act II in the stage version, and is an ensemble number).   

The TCMFF showed this in 3-D a few years back and that put a different spin on it.  I didn't know it had been filmed in 3-D until the festival scheduled it, but once you know that, you can tell by the odd camera angles, depth of the sets (especially on the theater's stage) and the fact that things are thrown towards the camera periodically.  I never noticed this before.

One thing I've never liked is the disappearing/re-appearing thrust stage in the theater.  It appears for "Where is the Life That Late I Led?" and then disappears immediately afterwards.

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Many musicals aren't as good as the stage versions when they are turned into movies.  My Fair Lady and On The Town are two examples.  Cabaret was a vehicle for Liza M. in the film; however, the stage version's star is the Joel Grey character (the host).

Yesterday afternoon I watched As Good As It Gets (again).  It is a bit cliched, but I still like it.  Has anyone heard anything about Jack N. having some form of dementia (he is now morbidly obese)?

 

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14 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I really liked Kiss Me Kate.  I just watched it for the first time early last year?? Maybe the year before? I don't even remember now.  It was fairly recent, however.  Normally, I'm not a fan of Kathryn Grayson.  I find her singing to be very shrill and unpleasant to listen to.  However, in this film, she seemed to have toned it down a smidge, or perhaps it was just less annoying in this movie.  I loved Ann Miller's "Too Darn Hot" number.  I especially loved her scenes with Tommy Rall, Bobby Van, and Bob Fosse.   I loved Howard Keel in this movie, and there was so much more of him to see in this film o.O 

While I haven't seen Taming of the Shrew performed in the manner in which Shakespeare intended, I have seen 10 Things I Hate About You, also based on 'Shrew.'  It was easy to draw parallels between the characters in that film and the characters in 'Kate' and I was able to keep straight who was who and what was happening in the play within the film. 

I actually thought that Kathryn looked great in her "play wig" and costumes.  I found her "real-life" blonde wig to be very unflattering.   

I loved the costumes in this film and I enjoyed how colorful it was.  This was a great movie, one that I had put off seeing for such a long time. 

Ann is really great Stage Door that she made with Lucy when she was 14.  It is fascinating to see her holding her own with the likes of Lucy, Ginger Rogers, Eve Arden, and Katharine Hepburn. 

I'd like to see "Stage Door".  I haven't come across it in recent months.

Lori

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39 minutes ago, Lori Ann said:

I'd like to see "Stage Door".  I haven't come across it in recent months.

Lori

It's an RKO film, so it's in the TCM library and features so many big-name stars.  I'm sure it'll be shown a least a few times this year.

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A lot of films have been described as "Grand Hotel on X." But Luxury Liner (1933) (not to be confused with Luxury Liner [1948], even if both do feature George Brent) deserves special mention, because it's based on a potboiler novel, in this case by Gina Kaus, and Paramount was undoubtedly hoping to replicate some of MGM's magic. The primary plot features Brent as a doctor whose wife has run off with a financier (Frank Morgan). Brent wangles his way into serving as the ship's doctor for the trans-Atlantic trip (his rear end failing to capsize the boat). Before long Morgan is shocked--shocked!--that his paramour did not properly clear matters with her husband before leaving him (and at any rate, Morgan has met an operatic soprano in whose...career?...he takes particular interest). The B plots feature Alice White as a steerage-class gold digger who breathlessly aspires to the A decks by any means necessary, C. Aubrey Smith as a ruined textile magnate who is kinder to White than she deserves, and a couple of medical cases who help the good doctor to see what is truly best in life (namely ship's nurse Zita Johann, who of course has a Tragic Past, with which she may finally come to terms after having met Brent). Recommended if you're not allergic to melodrama.

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10 hours ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

A lot of films have been described as "Grand Hotel on X." But Luxury Liner (1933) (not to be confused with Luxury Liner [1948], even if both do feature George Brent) deserves special mention, because it's based on a potboiler novel, in this case by Gina Kaus, and Paramount was undoubtedly hoping to replicate some of MGM's magic. The primary plot features Brent as a doctor whose wife has run off with a financier (Frank Morgan). Brent wangles his way into serving as the ship's doctor for the trans-Atlantic trip (his rear end failing to capsize the boat). Before long Morgan is shocked--shocked!--that his paramour did not properly clear matters with her husband before leaving him (and at any rate, Morgan has met an operatic soprano in whose...career?...he takes particular interest). The B plots feature Alice White as a steerage-class gold digger who breathlessly aspires to the A decks by any means necessary, C. Aubrey Smith as a ruined textile magnate who is kinder to White than she deserves, and a couple of medical cases who help the good doctor to see what is truly best in life (namely ship's nurse Zita Johann, who of course has a Tragic Past, with which she may finally come to terms after having met Brent). Recommended if you're not allergic to melodrama.

Fascinating! Thank you! 
That’s really pretty wild, The suggestion that any woman would pass over George Brent in his prime for Frank Morgan!!!!!

(I know we all like to kid George, but in the early 30s he was a really good looking guy)

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I've been watching Martin Scorsese's 7 part documentary on Fran Leibowitz called PRETEND IT'S A CITY on (ick) Netflix. I really love when Scorsese chooses subjects like this to immortalize on film. To date my favorites of his are KUNDUN '97, KING OF COMEDY '82 and ITALIAN AMERICAN '74 - all brilliant time capsule, charactor studies.

Scorsese does it again: taking a pretty every day normal person and showing all that's extraordinary about them. His filmmaking & editing skills of choosing what to show & how to film it are so honed at this point, he's mastered it perfectly. For the ages. This is what strong filmmaking should look like. 

 

 

OK, so maybe I'm biased because this world is so familiar to me, Frannie even resembles me (back when I could get a haircut) and I recognize the places & situations she's speaking about. I just love her wisdom & "take" on life; a constant complaining optimist.

There are several scenes of Fran walking on the 1939 World's Fair Exhibit Map of NYC housed in the Museum at Flushing Meadows making her look like Godzilla or a goddess reining over the City. Adorable. And the music chosen is perfect, always hints NYC, classic yet sometimes edgy, no cheesy  "radio" hits.

A good documentary tells me something I didn't already know. While I knew a lot about Fran, I was not aware she knew Charles Mingus, a fascinating segment of her story.  Thank you Marty for making something (non violent) I can enjoy. 

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Voyage to the Prehistoric Planet (1965)

 

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Year: 2020. Two astronauts have a hard landing on Venus. They assemble their Ikea-inspired robot and begin exploring only to be attacked by midget Godzillas. Three more astronauts with a bubble car go to rescue them. Big Bird's distant cousin who has been on crack for twenty years attacks the bubble car. Exploration reveals the remnants of a civilization and much time is spent pondering navels, beautiful alien women and man's place in the universe. 

 

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This movie is a sort of three-for-one special. It was originally made as: Planeta bur (1962). Infamous Roger Corman purchased rights to the movie, dubbed the dialogue into English and added scenes with Basil Rathbone so it would appeal to American audience. He recreated also all scenes of Kyunna Ignatova with Faith Domergue as fidgety woman left in orbit to monitor activity on the surface. The movie was recut and scenes with Mamie Van Doren added for release as: Voyage to the Planet of Prehistoric Women (1968).

This is a decent movie if you can mentally block out Herr Corman's alterations. The scenes with Basil Rathbone are totally irrelevant. The original scenes with Kyunna Ignatova were insipid. The replacement scenes with Faith Domergue cause wincing and/or cringing in nine out of ten viewers. The dubbing was done by Mrs. Wilson's third grade class.

 

The bubble car is cool. The robot is super-cool. The landscaping is so-so. The boys in rubber lizard costumes are kinda fun. The flying animal is only a little worse than the bird in: The Giant Claw (1957). The last scene is truly inspired and beautifully captured!

5/10

Available on a twenty-five cent DVD from McKay's Used Books in Nashville, TN. ;)

 

 

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This afternoon, one of my premium stations ran the original Day of the Jackal starring Edward Fox.  Having seen the updated remake where Bruce Willis is the Jackal and just wouldn't shut up, I appreciated Fox's performance and the entire film (it is about an attempt to assassinate Charles DeGaulle) is so quiet and subtle in many ways.  If you have never seen the film, I definitely recommended it.

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10 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Fascinating! Thank you! 
That’s really pretty wild, The suggestion that any woman would pass over George Brent in his prime for Frank Morgan!!!!!

(I know we all like to kid George, but in the early 30s he was a really good looking guy)

I agree with you. But around that same time Frank Morgan had a well-functioning "daddy" mode--check out Success At Any Price or A Lost Lady (both 1934), in which he gives younger leading men some serious competition.

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44 minutes ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

I agree with you. But around that same time Frank Morgan had a well-functioning "daddy" mode--check out Success At Any Price or A Lost Lady (both 1934), in which he gives younger leading men some serious competition.

EW!! EW!!! EEEEW!!!

(and thank you. )


I have always been quite curious to see AFFAIRS OF CELLINI (1934) For which Frank Morgan earned a best actor nomination even though it is my understanding he has a supporting role (This was two years before they establish the supporting category.) I seem to recall hearing he plays a Lothario in that one as well.

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3 hours ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

I agree with you. But around that same time Frank Morgan had a well-functioning "daddy" mode--check out Success At Any Price or A Lost Lady (both 1934), in which he gives younger leading men some serious competition.

There is also the pre-code When Ladies Meet (1933).    In this film a young Myrna Loy is after the married Frank Morgan,   instead of suitor Robert Montgomery.

In the 40s version,   it is Joan Crawford after Herbert Marshall,  with Robert Taylor as the suitor.      (the point being that Crawford and Marshall as a couple is a lot more understandable than Loy and Morgan).

PS:  This reminds me of a classic Judge Judy line when a women sues a man for treating her badly and dumping her,  after she gives him money or buys him things;      There must be something there that I don't see!

 

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

EW!! EW!!! EEEEW!!!

(and thank you. )


I have always been quite curious to see AFFAIRS OF CELLINI (1934) For which Frank Morgan earned a best actor nomination even though it is my understanding he has a supporting role (This was two years before they establish the supporting category.) I seem to recall hearing he plays a Lothario in that one as well.

Morgan as the Duke is more of a wannabe (in contrast to Constance Bennett, who as the Duchess is clearly a...woman of great experience...). But Fay Wray's character is as dopey as she is beautiful, and Morgan's approach is quite effective.

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On 1/18/2021 at 9:36 AM, txfilmfan said:

The TCMFF showed this in 3-D a few years back and that put a different spin on it.  I didn't know it had been filmed in 3-D until the festival scheduled it, but once you know that, you can tell by the odd camera angles, depth of the sets (especially on the theater's stage) and the fact that things are thrown towards the camera periodically.  I never noticed this before.

One thing I've never liked is the disappearing/re-appearing thrust stage in the theater.  It appears for "Where is the Life That Late I Led?" and then disappears immediately afterwards.

I got the Blu3D on disk when it came out, and yes, the original theatrical version's pretty impressive.  There were only about two or three musicals (The French Line, Those Redheads From Seattle) that tried going 3D in '51-'53, but Kate was the only one that knew how to use the format enough to benefit from a deep Broadway stage.  👍

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The Time Travelers (1964)

 

Scientists accidentally create a portal which leads more than a century into the future and then collapses to trap them there. Mutants, androids and an all-hope-ends-at-a-certain-moment countdown are suitable challenges for the intrepid scientists.

Some of the reviews for this movie are absolutely glowing. I suspect that I am in quite different time continuum as I found it as slow as a broken watch. 

The true highlight of the movie is the excellent editing at the end. I can not speak of it because it is a spoiler but it is sufficiently interesting and unique as to justify watching the movie once.

4/11.7

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Dishonored Lady (1947)

Hedy Lamarr is the art director of a high class magazine living a precarious life of numerous affairs (a source of company gossip) who is on the verge of a breakdown. After smashing up her car in what may have been a suicide attempt outside a psychiatrist's home she starts seeing the shrink on a regular basis (professionally), only to walk off her job and relocate herself elsewhere where she meets a simple minded slob with whom she falls in love. Soon, however, faces from the past will reappear in her life, culminating in a murder trial.

Trite melodrama is primarily a showcase for Lamarr of whom references are made to her beauty at least once every five or ten minutes, it seems. Hedy, a limited actress, is actually not bad in her role, quite convincing in one scene in which her character is tipsy. The supporting cast is a reasonable one of male admirers, ranging from Dennis O'Keefe as a scientist with whom she falls in love to John Loder (in real life at the time Mr. Lamarr, or is it that she was Mrs. Loder?) as a smug, self satisfied, filthy rich client of hers with whom she has a dalliance, as well as William Lundigan, unexpectedly cast against type as a smug associate who turns out to be a scoundrel. The film's ending is quite contrived.

A minor but watchable film for fans of Lamarr and the melodramatically predictable.

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2 out of 4

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Last night, after a double dose of NCIS (which needs Ziva back as well as Robert Wagner and needs to stop forcing Torres and Bishop down our throats - two people who didn't even know Pearl Harbor Day).  The writing has gone downhill (or the show has jumped the shark).  After that, switched to TCM to see Judy Holliday shine in Adam's Rib.

I have a question for those of you who watch Jeopardy.  I've watched Ken Jennings and, while I have never cared for him, I feel he is moving the game along. True, he seems to lack the humor and adlib ability that Alex Trebek had; however, no one could fill those shoes.  Next up may be the perky Katie Couric, and later Mayim B.  They are only guest hosts, so I'm giving them all a chance (because I don't watch Jeopardy for the hosts - I want to guess the questions).  Excuse the convolution.

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I think Jennings is doing fine.  And JEOPARDY is to me like FAMILY FEUD in that I generally don't care who the host is( on Feud anyway) I just like the game.  And I want to guess the Jeopardy clues too, and the show has given me the mix of being surprised at how much I know, while at the same time reminding me how much I DON'T know!  ;)  And I give Jennings credit for having the courage to step into those enormous shoes Alex left behind.   Anyway( on the "just watched" front.....)

The other night I watched this excellent episode of AMERICAN MASTERS on PBS.

https://www.pbs.org/video/diahann-carroll-outtake-d89el6/?continuousplayautoplay=true

About the history of black female entertainers in America during the 20th century, and how some made breakthroughs, and some, like Abbey  Lincoln  and Nina Simone used their celebrity to become activists.  My only issue was they overlooked the career of African-American  dancer/actress/singer/French resistance fighter/civil rights activist JOSEPHINE BAKER.  centering instead on more contemporary figures like LENA HORNE, Ms. Lincoln, Ms. Simone, DIAHANN CARROLL , PAM GRIER .   I meant to post about this earlier but got tied up in other threads with other issues.  ;) 

Sepiatoe

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