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24 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Didnt the old AI go belly up at some point?  I think after the co-founder died?

AIP cracked during the late 70s. One of their co-founders, James Nicholson, did indeed die in the mid-1970s, shortly after he left the company he helped to found. (before his death, he had started a new Producers shingle over at 20th Century Fox, but had only produced two films before his death: The legend of Hell House with Roddy McDowell, Gayle Hunnicut, and Pamela Franklin and Dirty Mary, Crazy Larry with Peter Fonda, Susan George, Vic morrow, and Roddy McDowell again)

That was the start of the downfall. The other part happened when they started to spend a bit more on their films (without  improving the film quality). The Amityville horror and love at First Bite made plenty of money, but it wasn't enough to offset the losses from A Matter of Time (buzzsaw editing aside, the best movie they ever did), Force 10 from Navarone, The Island of Dr. Morneau, CHOMPS, Meteor, and a few others.  The quote from the surviving co-founder at the time was: "We're the Wollworths of the movie business,  but Woolworths is being outpriced" This left them vulnerable to a takeover which came from Filmways, who after a protracted time of negotiation, bought them out and renamed them Filmways Pictures, whose most notable films were two Brian De Palma films, Dressed to kill and Blow Out, plus a trio of late career films for veteran stars: The Earthling [William Holden], The First Deadly Sin [Frank Sinatra], and Tell Me a Riddle [Melvyn Douglas]. The new name only lasted two years before becoming the distribution arm of Orion. The irony of that was that the old AIP distribution network, once synonymous with exploitation,  was now being used to pump such high-tone films as The Cotton Club, Amadeus, The Purple Rose of Cairo, Platoon, Married to the Mob, Ran, Au Revoir Les Enfants, Women on the Verge of a nervous Breakdown, Hoosiers, Dances with Wolves, and The Silence of the Lambs into theatres.

For the record, the final  film of the old AIP was the heist film How to Beat the High Co$t of Living, an early 1980 time capsule, starring Jane Curtain, Susan Saint James, Jessica Lange, Eddie Albert, Richard Benjamin, Cathryn Damon, and Dabney Colman, which was pretty entertaining.

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4 hours ago, SansFin said:

So are: Dick, Johnson, Rod, ****, Leroy, ****, Junior and Frank.

In England, so is John Thomas. In Promise Her Anything Leslie Caron's baby is called John Thomas, and this was probably done for the reference which many wouldn't get.

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I remember now that (brief) period where AIP tried to go legit. They did a remake of Wuthering Heights with, I think, Timothy Dalton as Heathcliff.  A Matter of Time (that layed a HUGE expensive egg) etc.....

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14 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I remember now that (brief) period where AIP tried to go legit. They did a remake of Wuthering Heights with, I think, Timothy Dalton as Heathcliff.  A Matter of Time (that layed a HUGE expensive egg) etc.....

Most of what they either produced or distributed was schlock, but there were a few over the years that stand out.  Some that I remember:

  • The Pawnbroker
  • Dillinger
  • Some of my Best Friends Are...
  • Mad Max (US distributor)

I distinctly remember Dillinger, as several scenes were filmed in my hometown, and that was a big deal for an 8 year old...

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January 6
Death on the Nile
 (EMI; dist. in the US by Paramount, 1978)
Source: TCM

I am tentatively trying to get back on my plan of posting and reviewing every movie I watch this year. Various circumstances, family tragedy and some sort of general sense of malaise within me sidetracked me very early on. I don't know if I can recover, since I'm now nine weeks behind. I can only review one movie at a time and see what I can do! I definitely need to do shorter reviews if I'm going to have any prayer, although it will probably be hard for me to show brevity on an old sentimental favorite like this one. Two months ago, I watched LornaHansonForbes' link to the video showing all the errors in this movie. I must admit, though my viewing in January was probably 15th or 20th time to watch it, I wasn't aware of virtually any of them, although I think maybe once I noted the reversal of positions of the two newlyweds climbing the pyramid. I guess I'm not very observant, or I was just so sucked in, I didn't notice.

I think I was in fourth grade when my parents and my older brother went to the see this movie without me. I don't recall the circumstances, but I must have  either been sleeping over at a friend's house or with one set of grandparents. My mom and brother both raved about it. I didn't see it until it aired on HBO, probably a year later. It sparked a several year obsession with Agatha Christie and particularly the Hercule Poirot mysteries with me. Our local Waldenbooks put out all her paperbacks and had them neatly stacked in chronological order, using up a massive amount of shelf space that would certainly never happen today, and I started with Murder on the Links and went on through to Curtain. I don't know many 11-year-olds were reading Agatha Christie then. I can say with some confidence in my many years as both a teacher and substitute teacher that roughly zero per cent of 11-year-olds are aware of her existence now. I also read maybe two Miss Marples and 10 Little Indians, but otherwise, I was all about Poirot. Probably quite sexist of me.

Death on the Nile was one of Christie's "travelogue" mysteries, like Murder on the Orient Express. As I recall, these books were quite a bit longer than the standard Poirot mysteries and obviously set in exotic locales. I read the book after seeing the movie. As I recall, the plot is very similar. The movie does sort of painstakingly make a case in its middle third to show why each suspect, even some really unlikely ones, might want to have committed the murder and how in a bit of a repetitive fashion that I think the book handled better. Even at age 11 with not a lot of movie-watching experience, I was like, "Yeah, okay, I get it. Any one of them could have done it."

In England, there's a fabulously wealthy young woman (Lois Chiles) who has a peniless bestie (Mia Farrow) who's informed her she's fallen in love with and is engaged to a brilliant young man (Simon MacCorkindale) who's "as poor as a church mouse", and can she bring him round and maybe see if the rich woman can find some kind of employment before him. Next scene, Farrow introduces MacCorkindale to Chiles, and they smile at each other way too long. Jump ahead a few months, it's Chiles and MacCorkindale who are married and Farrow playing the role of bitter, deranged stalker. They try to flee to Cairo to get away from her, but she books passage on the same boat about to go on a Nile excursion. Also sailing is Poirot, played for the first time by Peter Ustinov. 

Okay, Mild Spoiler Alerts from here on out.

If you've never seen the movie before, it take a little time to figure out who the victim is going to be, because the movie takes its time to work up to the murder. It's the wealthy woman, who gets shot in the temple in her cabin just after a great deal of commotion has been going on involving violence between the Farrow and MacCorkindale characters. Though Farrow would initially seem the obvious suspect, the aftermath of said violence indicates it was physically impossible for her to have committed the murder. That's okay, though: the whole damn ship is populated with a who's who of actors whose characters all bore Chiles a grudge: Bette Davis, Angela Lansbury, Maggie Smith, Jack Warden, Olivia Hussey, George Kennedy and Jane Birkin. I may be forgetting a couple.

I will only reveal that most of these characters are window dressing, as a Christie story typically needs a lot of suspects, and the main triangle of characters provide the thread that needs to be followed most closely from beginning to end. The way the murder was committed, and the way the murderer avoids detection (at least temporarily - no one escapes Poirot) is probably preposterous if you give it too much thought, but very clever for an escapist movie.\

I especially like Ustinov. He's still my favorite Poirot. On this most recent viewing, I was particularly struck by the scenes between him and Farrow early on, where he warns her about letting evil nest in her heart. I find Farrow something of a mixed bag. I've never cared for her much in most of her non-Woody Allen movies (I'm not going to talk about that controversy anymore. I thought I gave a very fair summary of that new documentary, and Hibi bust a gut laughing at me, saying I sounded like an Allen PR agent. So maybe we're not even aware of our own biases), but she's very riveting here. I don't remember if this or Return from Witch Mountain came out first, but those were the first two Bette Davis movies I ever saw, and then that song came out, and I was like, "Woah, guess she was a big deal." I don't suppose I'd ever seen a picture of her younger self at that time. The snippy banter between her and Smith is great fun, and I assume the latter was thrilled to get to share the screen with the former?  Similarly, I saw this movie and the Disney movie Candleshoe around the same time, followed not long after by one of the very late Pink Panther movies, and that trio was my introduction to David Niven at the very end of his career. He's charming as all get out as Poirot's Watson (more or less) in this one. I love the scene where he tangos with Lansbury (this film was also my introduction to her). MacCorkindale was briefly a big deal, but I never really heard from him again after Jaws 3-D and Manimal. I was kinda sad to see on his imdb page that he died more than 10 years ago in his late '50s.

Anyway, I love the on-location shooting (was it on-location? I better pull in the reigns on that assumption, but it's very authentic-looking). It was very evocative of a time that I'm sort of sad I missed, when people of means could travel so glamorously, although it does reek a bit of colonial privilege. I always laugh when the ship's host says "I grovel in mortification". And the ending is pretty boffo.

With all the big movies being postponed during the pandemic, I am only vaguely becoming aware again that film is finally about to get the Kenneth Branagh treatment, after his adaptation of Orient Express. I found that film only kind of okay. Essentially the same plot with some dumb extra scenes and unnecessary CGI. I fear this one will be more of the same.

Death on the Nile (1978 film) - Wikipedia

 Total movies seen this year: 11

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January 7
The Smiling Lieutenant 
(Paramount, 1931)
Source: TCM

This movie, which maybe should have been called The Winking Lieutenant, was part of Miriam Hopkins' Star of the Month spotlight. It was maybe my fifth, sixth, seventh time to see it. We got the obligatory references to Lubitsch Touch in the intro. I see this was Paramount's biggest grossing of the film of the year, so it was clearly a big deal.

Maurice Chevalier plays a lieutenant in the Austrian royal guard who's quite the Don Juan. His comrade in arms played by the always-memorable Charlie Ruggles takes him to meet the woman Ruggles is sweet on, a concert violinist played by a strikingly young Claudette Colbert. Since one man is Maurice Chevalier and the other is Charlie Ruggles, Colbert winds up as Chevalier's girlfriend. Sadly, the gobsmacked and disgruntled Ruggles disappears from the film at this point. 

Sometime later, the king of the neighboring postage-stamp fictional country of Flausenthurm and his daughter, played by Hopkins, pay a state visit. While standing guard at the welcoming ceremony, Chevalier spots Colbert at the crowd and winks at her .... except Hopkins thinks he's winking at her. To avoid an international incident, Chevalier must prove his intentions were honorable and marry Hopkins. He's set up for a life of luxury, but it's a life, he finds very boring, so as often as he can, he puts on a tuxedo and straw hat (looking like Bing Crosby) and heads out to rendezvous with Colbert. Meanwhile, Hopkins is heartbroken. 

Spoiler Alert

Hopkins summons Colbert to a private audience and bares her soul. Colbert isn't unsympathetic. She doesn't want to be a palace-wrecker, I guess. And so she gives Hopkins some advice on how to encourage Chevalier to stay home more often, along the lines of the way Sandy hooks Danny at the end of Grease. I don't know how women are supposed to interpret this. Being a bit of a "hoor" is alright within the playful confines of marriage, apparently.

There are several clever sight gags, and I probably like best the scene near the end between Colbert and Hopkins. There's a kiss between them that seems to linger just a fraction of a second too long. This is not really my favorite Lubitsch film, but there's nothing I can really think of to say that's wrong with it. I give it a thumbs up, thought I might not go out of my way to watch it again any time soon.

Okay, how's that for brevity?

The Smiling Lieutenant - Wikipedia

Total movies seen this year: 12

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9 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Always wise.

PS- HOW can something be BOTH AMERICAN and INTERNATIONAL?

It is common nomenclature in business. An American company is one which is based in America and has little market penetration in other countries. An American International company is based in America but has sales offices and/or distribution networks in other countries. A multinational is a company with executive offices in more than one country and is rarely identified with its country of origin.

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9 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

PS- HOW can something be BOTH AMERICAN and INTERNATIONAL?

Joel:  "Well, let's watch and find out..."

For the record, the final  film of the old AIP was the heist film How to Beat the High Co$t of Living, an early 1980 time capsule, starring Jane Curtain, Susan Saint James, Jessica Lange, Eddie Albert, Richard Benjamin, Cathryn Damon, and Dabney Colman, which was pretty entertaining.

I'd heard it was debated either between their distribution of the original "Mad Max", or "Gorp", a Meatballs-wannabe summer-camp slob comedy (also 1980).

8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

THE OPENING CREDITS:

I'm not sure what classical piece is being eerily homaged for the theme, but are any old-school Sesame Street alumni flashing back on "A-B-C-D-E, C-D-E-F-G...."?

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On 5/27/2015 at 11:43 PM, misswonderly3 said:

 

Hmm, db, I'm not sure if you mean my "enormous assumption" is that the Lee Remick character was "happy" before becoming an alcoholic, or  that most people who become alcoholics already have some kind of pain, which they try to mask by drinking.

 

I just meant, going by the information the film gives us (which is all we can go by), Kirsten was a fairly happy young woman before she succombed to her drinking problem. So, if she could become clean again, she'd have a relatively nice life to return to (as I said, she was still quite young, she had a husband who loved and supported her, and a child who wanted her mother back.)

 

I understand why she would be afraid to take on the enormous challenge of trying to overcome her addiction. What I don't understand is why, with so many reasons to do so (try), she didn't even want to.

 

Not being an expert on the subject of addiction ( I have a very close friend who's a life-long alcoholic, but that hardly qualifies me), I cannot really address the other  "assumption": that is, that people who develop an addiction problem are in some way unhappy already, even before they become addicted. Perhaps there are many who, like Kirsten in TDOWAR, are happy enough before the drinking takes over.

But what I'm talking about is not the tremendous difficulty of overcoming the alcohol addiction;  what I'm talking about is not even having the desire to attempt it. The Remick character had a lot of reasons to have the will to try, even if it was going to be an intimidatingly hard thing to do.

"what I'm talking about is not even having the desire to attempt it." That IS alcoholism.

 

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14 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

AIP cracked during the late 70s. (snipped) pretty entertaining.

Did you write this directly from your brain or did you have to reference it?

Everyone has their specialty interest when it comes to history. 

Thanks for posting the opening title, Lorna. I'm often impressed with the artistry of AIP credits, they're like cheesy low budget versions of Saul Bass animation. But in retrospect are definitely more creative and mood setting than modern credits. (I recorded that movie-can't wait to watch it)

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2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Thanks for posting the opening title, Lorna. I'm often impressed with the artistry of AIP credits, they're like cheesy low budget versions of Saul Bass animation. But in retrospect are definitely more creative and mood setting than modern credits. (I recorded that movie-can't wait to watch it)

THE OPENING CREDITS TO BLACULA ARE EVEN BETTER: THEY'RE LIKE IF EDWARD GOREY HAD DESIGNED THE ATARI GAME "ADVENTURE"

***WARNING: SOME OF YOU MAY NOT BE READY FOR THIS MUCH FUNK DEPENDING ON YOUR TIME ZONE

 

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10 hours ago, EricJ said:

Joel:  "Well, let's watch and find out..."/ I'm not sure what classical piece is being eerily homaged for the theme, but are any old-school Sesame Street alumni flashing back on "A-B-C-D-E, C-D-E-F-G...."?

Believe it or not, for a good deal of my life, I would "put on" an episode of MST the way people put on their favorite albums or playlists while cleaning the house, doing the crossword, etc. etc. This was, I have to honestly so, an inadvertant quote on my part- MSTisms have entered my subconscious to where I spout them without intent to claim them as me own.

Although I am sure not even CROW was THE FIRST to ask how something could be AMERICAN and INTERNATIONAL.

I am struggling to recall the SESAME STREET BIT to which you refer, and I was a hardcore watcher in the early 80's. any chance you can provide a video reference? i am genuinely intrigued.

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If I may tack on to discussion of THE DUNWICH HORROR:

DEAN STOCKWELL is an actor who I like and admire very very much, he is- in my opinion- the best child actor I have ever seen, and he matured into a fine-looking young man and really gifted actor, period.  a misfire of a performance from him is still 100% worth watching, and he is also really cute in this film. he is supposed to be THE DEVIL'S CABANA BOY** but he has these GIANT BROWN EYES and CURLS that are just ADORABLE, he really looks about as sinister as GABE KAPLAN.

**SIMPSONS quote.

a fun way to watch THE DUNWICH HORROR for those of who have yet to see it (no spoilers!) is to view it as an unofficial sequel to IMITATION OF LIFE, where SANDRA DEE as SUSIE MEREDITH is PULLING A CHRISTINA CRAWFORD, setting out on her own as an actress sans financing or management/agent connections courtesy of MOTHER and THIS is the VEHICLE she has (unwisely) chosen to star in.

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7 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

DEAN STOCKWELL is an actor who I like and admire very very much, he is- in my opinion- the best child actor I have ever seen, and he matured into a fine-looking young man and really gifted actor, period.  a misfire of a performance from his is still 100% worth watching, and he is also really cute in this film. he is supposed to be THE DEVIL'S CABANA BOY** but he has these GIANT BROWN EYES and CURLS that are just ADORABLE, he really looks about as sinister as GABE KAPLAN.

My favorite Dean Stockwell as a child performance is in The Happy Years (1950), based on Owen Johnson's Lawrenceville Stories. Stockwell is the star of this highly enjoyable film about a bad boy in early 20th century New Jersey.

HappyYears-500x264.jpg

Happy_years.jpg

 

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2 minutes ago, Swithin said:

My favorite Dean Stockwell as a child performance is in The Happy Years (1950), based on Owen Johnson's Lawrenceville Stories. Stockwell is the star of this highly enjoyable film about a bad boy in early 20th century New Jersey.

 

 

Thanks, I've never heard of that one! IT'S A BEEN A WHILE since I've seen it, but I recall being BLOWN AWAY by his performance in  DOWN TO THE SEA IN SHIPS, a 1949 whaling picture he did for Fox with LIONEL BARRYMORE.

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13 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

January 6
Death on the Nile
 (EMI; dist. in the US by Paramount, 1978)
Source: TCM

I am tentatively trying to get back on my plan of posting and reviewing every movie I watch this year. Various circumstances, family tragedy and some sort of general sense of malaise within me sidetracked me very early on. I don't know if I can recover, since I'm now nine weeks behind. I can only review one movie at a time and see what I can do! I definitely need to do shorter reviews if I'm going to have any prayer, although it will probably be hard for me to show brevity on an old sentimental favorite like this one. Two months ago, I watched LornaHansonForbes' link to the video showing all the errors in this movie. I must admit, though my viewing in January was probably 15th or 20th time to watch it, I wasn't aware of virtually any of them, although I think maybe once I noted the reversal of positions of the two newlyweds climbing the pyramid. I guess I'm not very observant, or I was just so sucked in, I didn't notice.

I think I was in fourth grade when my parents and my older brother went to the see this movie without me. I don't recall the circumstances, but I must have  either been sleeping over at a friend's house or with one set of grandparents. My mom and brother both raved about it. I didn't see it until it aired on HBO, probably a year later. It sparked a several year obsession with Agatha Christie and particularly the Hercule Poirot mysteries with me. Our local Waldenbooks put out all her paperbacks and had them neatly stacked in chronological order, using up a massive amount of shelf space that would certainly never happen today, and I started with Murder on the Links and went on through to Curtain. I don't know many 11-year-olds were reading Agatha Christie then. I can say with some confidence in my many years as both a teacher and substitute teacher that roughly zero per cent of 11-year-olds are aware of her existence now. I also read maybe two Miss Marples and 10 Little Indians, but otherwise, I was all about Poirot. Probably quite sexist of me.

Death on the Nile was one of Christie's "travelogue" mysteries, like Murder on the Orient Express. As I recall, these books were quite a bit longer than the standard Poirot mysteries and obviously set in exotic locales. I read the book after seeing the movie. As I recall, the plot is very similar. The movie does sort of painstakingly make a case in its middle third to show why each suspect, even some really unlikely ones, might want to have committed the murder and how in a bit of a repetitive fashion that I think the book handled better. Even at age 11 with not a lot of movie-watching experience, I was like, "Yeah, okay, I get it. Any one of them could have done it."

In England, there's a fabulously wealthy young woman (Lois Chiles) who has a peniless bestie (Mia Farrow) who's informed her she's fallen in love with and is engaged to a brilliant young man (Simon MacCorkindale) who's "as poor as a church mouse", and can she bring him round and maybe see if the rich woman can find some kind of employment before him. Next scene, Farrow introduces MacCorkindale to Chiles, and they smile at each other way too long. Jump ahead a few months, it's Chiles and MacCorkindale who are married and Farrow playing the role of bitter, deranged stalker. They try to flee to Cairo to get away from her, but she books passage on the same boat about to go on a Nile excursion. Also sailing is Poirot, played for the first time by Peter Ustinov. 

Okay, Mild Spoiler Alerts from here on out.

If you've never seen the movie before, it take a little time to figure out who the victim is going to be, because the movie takes its time to work up to the murder. It's the wealthy woman, who gets shot in the temple in her cabin just after a great deal of commotion has been going on involving violence between the Farrow and MacCorkindale characters. Though Farrow would initially seem the obvious suspect, the aftermath of said violence indicates it was physically impossible for her to have committed the murder. That's okay, though: the whole damn ship is populated with a who's who of actors whose characters all bore Chiles a grudge: Bette Davis, Angela Lansbury, Maggie Smith, Jack Warden, Olivia Hussey, George Kennedy and Jane Birkin. I may be forgetting a couple.

I will only reveal that most of these characters are window dressing, as a Christie story typically needs a lot of suspects, and the main triangle of characters provide the thread that needs to be followed most closely from beginning to end. The way the murder was committed, and the way the murderer avoids detection (at least temporarily - no one escapes Poirot) is probably preposterous if you give it too much thought, but very clever for an escapist movie.\

I especially like Ustinov. He's still my favorite Poirot. On this most recent viewing, I was particularly struck by the scenes between him and Farrow early on, where he warns her about letting evil nest in her heart. I find Farrow something of a mixed bag. I've never cared for her much in most of her non-Woody Allen movies (I'm not going to talk about that controversy anymore. I thought I gave a very fair summary of that new documentary, and Hibi bust a gut laughing at me, saying I sounded like an Allen PR agent. So maybe we're not even aware of our own biases), but she's very riveting here. I don't remember if this or Return from Witch Mountain came out first, but those were the first two Bette Davis movies I ever saw, and then that song came out, and I was like, "Woah, guess she was a big deal." I don't suppose I'd ever seen a picture of her younger self at that time. The snippy banter between her and Smith is great fun, and I assume the latter was thrilled to get to share the screen with the former?  Similarly, I saw this movie and the Disney movie Candleshoe around the same time, followed not long after by one of the very late Pink Panther movies, and that trio was my introduction to David Niven at the very end of his career. He's charming as all get out as Poirot's Watson (more or less) in this one. I love the scene where he tangos with Lansbury (this film was also my introduction to her). MacCorkindale was briefly a big deal, but I never really heard from him again after Jaws 3-D and Manimal. I was kinda sad to see on his imdb page that he died more than 10 years ago in his late '50s.

Anyway, I love the on-location shooting (was it on-location? I better pull in the reigns on that assumption, but it's very authentic-looking). It was very evocative of a time that I'm sort of sad I missed, when people of means could travel so glamorously, although it does reek a bit of colonial privilege. I always laugh when the ship's host says "I grovel in mortification". And the ending is pretty boffo.

With all the big movies being postponed during the pandemic, I am only vaguely becoming aware again that film is finally about to get the Kenneth Branagh treatment, after his adaptation of Orient Express. I found that film only kind of okay. Essentially the same plot with some dumb extra scenes and unnecessary CGI. I fear this one will be more of the same.

Death on the Nile (1978 film) - Wikipedia

 Total movies seen this year: 11

I didn't know Simon Mac. had died. How sad. His career never panned out after this film for some reason. Yes, it really was shot on location. Not sure all the interior boat scenes were, but they really were floating down the Nile. I remember Bette complaining afterwards about the heat and how in the good old days they'd have shot it on a studio set...........

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59 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

If I may tack on to discussion of THE DUNWICH HORROR:

DEAN STOCKWELL is an actor who I like and admire very very much, he is- in my opinion- the best child actor I have ever seen, and he matured into a fine-looking young man and really gifted actor, period.  a misfire of a performance from him is still 100% worth watching, and he is also really cute in this film. he is supposed to be THE DEVIL'S CABANA BOY** but he has these GIANT BROWN EYES and CURLS that are just ADORABLE, he really looks about as sinister as GABE KAPLAN.

**SIMPSONS quote.

a fun way to watch THE DUNWICH HORROR for those of who have yet to see it (no spoilers!) is to view it as an unofficial sequel to IMITATION OF LIFE, where SANDRA DEE as SUSIE MEREDITH is PULLING A CHRISTINA CRAWFORD, setting out on her own as an actress sans financing or management/agent connections courtesy of MOTHER and THIS is the VEHICLE she has (unwisely) chosen to star in.

LOL. I think Universal didnt renew Dee's contract and she was free lancing and seemed all at sea. (they put her in a lot of dumb projects towards the end) She never regained her footing and her personal problems took over her life. I peeked at a few Horror scenes and agree Stockwell was really cute in this film.

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2 minutes ago, Hibi said:

LOL. I think Universal didnt renew Dee's contract and she was free lancing and seemed all at sea. (they put her in a lot of dumb projects towards the end) She never regained her footing and her personal problems took over her life. I peeked at a few Horror scenes and agree Stockwell was really cute in this film.

w7O2irSRYlee6jYsLR2hzDUCI4s.jpg

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