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14 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I didn't know Simon Mac. had died. How sad. His career never panned out after this film for some reason. Yes, it really was shot on location. Not sure all the interior boat scenes were, but they really were floating down the Nile. I remember Bette complaining afterwards about the heat and how in the good old days they'd have shot it on a studio set...........

i HAVE MENTIONED this before, but I was once BLESSED to have met someone who worked on JAWS 3-D (very high-up in the below the line dept.-someone who insured the actors for shooting, so they know all the gossip) and they ADORED SIMON MACORKINDALE (SP?) and said he was, quite possibly, the kindest, classiest, most wonderful person they have ever worked with and this person KNEW EVERYONE BY THIS TIME (they had long since moved up in the industry.)

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57 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

It doesn't really capture the awfulness of the film though!. I tried watching it once (on TCM, I think) and couldnt get through more than 10 mins of it. Not sure Minnelli's 3 hour cut would've been any better.

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8 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

(I think they were going for EDGAR ALLEN POE, but it just sort of reads "MIST-ER KOT-TER!"

LOL!!!

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Just now, Hibi said:

It doesn't really capture the awfulness of the film though!. I tried watching it once (on TCM, I think) and couldnt get through more than 10 mins of it. Not sure Minnelli's 3 hour cut would've been any better.

I have never heard of this film until an hour ago, but I am going to make a BOLD WAGER that, no, it would not.

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3 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i HAVE MENTIONED this before, but I was once BLESSED to have met someone who worked on JAWS 3-D (very high-up in the below the line dept.-someone who insured the actors for shooting, so they know all the gossip) and they ADORED SIMON MACORKINDALE (SP?) and said he was, quite possibly, the kindest, classiest, most wonderful person they have ever worked with and this person KNEW EVERYONE BY THIS TIME (they had long since moved up in the industry.)

LIfe isn't fair. What a shame.

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Last night, I watched Austenland with Keri Russell as a woman obsessed with the author.  She attends Austenland, run by a very nasty Jane Seymour, and, because Ms. Russell has a bargain package, she is treated like dirt by several people.  It was cute and Jennifer Coolidge almost steals the show.  I have seen at least one other movie with obsessed Austen fans, including one with Emily Blunt.  I've read all of Austen at least once (and have seen several movie adaptations); however, while I consider myself a Dickensian and was a member of a Dickensian society, I am not obsessed with him.  After that, watched Robert Irvin on Food Network (Restaurant and Dinner Impossible) because they weren't repeats.

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January 7
Trouble in Paradise
 (Paramount, 1932)
Source: TCM

Again Lubitsch, again Hopkins. Now, this is a film I will stop and watch every time it's on. It was just on again Sunday I think on a night devoted to Kay Francis (or Fwancis as one poster on here, I've forgotten who, must call her every time she's mentioned), but I'm visiting my mother and was unable to watch. Not sure I can pinpoint why I find this film so much more compelling than The Smiling Lieutenant. The twists and turns of the plot are part of it, as are the charms of Herbert Marshall. He wasn't handsome enough to be a full-time romantic lead, I guess, but he works just fine, more than fine, in that role in this movie.

Marshall and Hopkins are con artists and thieves each pretending to be someone they're not. They arrange a private romantic dinner, each with the intent of fleecing the other. In a clever touch, only when they both realize they're being fleeced by the other do they realize they've found their soul mate. Or so it seems. They launch an elaborate plot to insinuate themselves into the lives of a fabulously wealthy female tycoon (Francis), by first stealing a valuable item of hers than returning it for the reward money. They both become personal assistants to Francis. I think they're pretending to be brother and sister? I've forgotten that part. Anyway, in the course of the deception, as Marshall and Hopkins are plotting to really fleece Francis of everything, Marshall proves to be a remarkably good personal assistant, and he and Francis become attracted to each other, leaving Hopkins seething with jealousy. Meanwhile, Francis' associates, who are suspicious of Marshall from the get-go, edge more closely to discovering his true identity. Much of this depends on the memory of one Edward Everett Horton, a would-be suitor of Francis' whom Marshall once conked on the head while robbing him blind in Venice. Horton and Charlie Ruggles, who was underused in Lubitsch's Smiling Lieutenant, provide a lot of nice comic relief as battling suitors for Francis' hand, though she only has eyes for Marshall.

I always get wrapped up wondering how it's all going to end (not entirely sure I remember right now, which is just as well, since I can't spoil the ending). Someone is going to have to get hurt or make a sacrifice. 

I've already praised Marshall. Francis I can kind of take or leave, although I like her here with her quiet confidence and her adoration of Marshall. Hopkins has to play a broader role, at first the love interest, then the increasingly frustrated partner who fears she's about to be thrown over. She's fearless in the part and makes the movie stronger. Like in Lieutenant, there are many clever Lubitsch sight gags. And no musical numbers, which is probably one I reason why I like it better.

This is one of the great early sophisticated comedies, and I highly recommend it.

Trouble in Paradise (1932 film) - Wikipedia

Total movies seen this year: 13

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9 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Did you write this directly from your brain or did you have to reference it?

Everyone has their specialty interest when it comes to history. 

I had to cross-verify a few facts a bit, but otherwise its what I have read and learned over the years from research.

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Secrets of the Castle (2017)

 

"Guédelon is the world’s biggest experimental archaeological site." They are constructing a castle using only techniques, tools and materials available in the 13th Century. This is a five-episode documentary of a historian and two archaeologists who spent six months at the site.

This is so perfectly and wonderfully fascinating! It truly examines many of the oft-overlooked aspects of Medieval life. How stone is cut and laid into the walls is interesting but this goes even into the probable method of putting reeds on cottage floor for comfort and cleanliness. The historian leaves much of the heavy work to the archaeologists but grinding wheat into flour means turning a heavy stone for two hours each day! She rediscovers the method by which they likely made gold thread for embroidery.  She approaches each task with enthusiasm while knowing that she will not be as good at it as a Medieval peasant. 

That it took the skilled craftsmen on site a total of two-thousand-seven-hundred hours to cut and carve the stone for one Gothic window gives one a much greater appreciation for the amount of labor involved in building cathedrals of that period. 

Every trade and skill which you can imagine went into castle construction at some point and this series reveals important aspects of many of them.

9/9.9

 More information about the project and sample videos may be found at: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04sv5nc

 

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8 hours ago, Hibi said:

It doesn't really capture the awfulness of the film though!. I tried watching it once (on TCM, I think) and couldnt get through more than 10 mins of it. Not sure Minnelli's 3 hour cut would've been any better.

I was going to say I enjoyed A Matter of Time, until I realized that you were talking about a completely different movie, and the movie I was thinking of was Time After Time, about HG Wells and Jack the Ripper in 1970s San Francisco.

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The Earth Dies Screaming (1964).

British B movie in which a bunch of people who were all in places with isolated air supplies find that something has destroyed the rest of humanity.  A couple of people in spaceman suits come and turn the dead into zombies.

At a little over an hour, it's worth one watch, and succeeds in what it does, but you know going in that it's not going to be anything notably great.

It's in the FXM rotation and is going to be on again next Monday and Tuesday.

6/10

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On 3/16/2021 at 5:53 AM, TikiSoo said:

Sad what first comes to mind for some about a performance. 😞

 

 

I don't feel sad about it, especially because "Joe" is an exploitation film and that's why Sarandon was cast.

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Just watched "Ran" off of Amazon Prime, one of the last Kurosawa films I hadn't seen.

 

Holy.  Cow.  Talk about a beautiful movie.  "Ran" is just gorgeous.  Old-fashioned spectacle filmmaking.  Kind of made me wish I could experience it in a movie theater.  The scene where King Lear's sons--sorry, blanking on the character name--storm the castle where he has holed up is absolutely jaw-dropping.

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16 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I am struggling to recall the SESAME STREET BIT to which you refer, and I was a hardcore watcher in the early 80's. any chance you can provide a video reference? i am genuinely intrigued.

The Alphabet Chat, where a highbrow Muppet host would rhapsodize about his favorite letter, despite various on-set...distractions.  😂

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lExKEuZtt4

16 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

THE OPENING CREDITS TO BLACULA ARE EVEN BETTER: THEY'RE LIKE IF EDWARD GOREY HAD DESIGNED THE ATARI GAME "ADVENTURE"

The strangest off-tone AIP credits, however, belong to Cry of the Banshee (1970), that wanted to give young animator Terry Gilliam his first break:

 

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Nightmare Alley is Tyrone Power's best work. Great movie. As for your earlier mention of Victor Mature, he was a vastly under-rated actor. He steals the show from Peter Sellers in his parody of his movie career in After the Fox. 

 

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AHA! I DID IT! I FINISHED DEATH IN VENICE (1971)!!!

I turned it off, like, EIGHT TIMES, but it KEPT SHOWING UP IN MY HULU FEED and I kept going back to it.

image.jpg

I feel the need to preface my remarks on this film with two things:

1. I know this is a film that is near and dear to a lot of you and i respect that

and

2. it's a good movie. ITS NOT A FILM FOR EVERYONE, but I respect anyone who LOVES it.

Now I would like to say that the closest analogy I can think for it, as a film, is: it the story of a director who paints a wall on a glorious summer day on the beach** in Venice (Italy) and shoots and photographs that paint drying for two and half hours SO lovingly and with such exquisite care that every single shot of that **** paint drying could be framed and hung up in a museum. IT IS SOME GORGEOUS, BRILLIANTLY SHOT AND LIT AND DRESSED AND FRAMED PAINT DRYING that goes on FOR TWO AND A HALF(?) HOURS. And THE DIRECTOR also hires a GREAT ACTOR (DIRK BOGARDE]  to SIT THERE AND WATCH THE PAINT DRY and draws forth from him a bold, vanity-free performance of SUCH UNDENIABLE DEPTH AND PROFUNDITY (again while sits there and watches the paint dry) THAT YOU CAN'T HELP BUT BE AWED by the TALENTS OF BOTH.

Also, I could not help but think of RUDY GIULIANI and THE HAIR DYE at the end of the movie.

Also also, i was not expecting it to be SO TOPICAL with THE THEME OF A PANDEMIC that is BEING DOWNPLAYED as an UNDERCURRENT TO ALL THE LANGUID, LOVELY, AMBER-TONED, EXQUISITE PAINT DRYING.

**- re "the beach" in VENICE, so, apparently there is LAND in Venice, Italy? I mean, before this movie I truly thought it was, like 80-90% canals, but no- there is actual land and even a beach in Venice, Italy, those of you who have been, yes?

 

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They just remade Nightmare Alley up around where I live.  Stop with the sequels, remakes, etc.  Robert Downey's Doctor Doolittle was a bomb, and, while I though Steve Martin made a good Father of the Bride, both he and the film could not stand up to the original (with Tracy) and its sequel.  Now Downey is old enough to take on the role.

Since I tend to fall asleep on the couch, I can usually find something to watch or watch something on demand.

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15 hours ago, Vidor said:

Just watched "Ran" off of Amazon Prime, one of the last Kurosawa films I hadn't seen.

 

Holy.  Cow.  Talk about a beautiful movie.  "Ran" is just gorgeous.  Old-fashioned spectacle filmmaking.  Kind of made me wish I could experience it in a movie theater.  The scene where King Lear's sons--sorry, blanking on the character name--storm the castle where he has holed up is absolutely jaw-dropping.

Totally agree. This may sound off to some, but, to me, there are similar scenes in Star Wars. I hardly doubt Kurosawa copied Lucas, as Star Wars came out first. Just that great film makers know how to do big scenes. 

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4 minutes ago, MrMagoo said:

Totally agree. This may sound off to some, but, to me, there are similar scenes in Star Wars. I hardly doubt Kurosawa copied Lucas, as Star Wars came out first. Just that great film makers know how to do big scenes. 

Not too surprising since George Lucas was influenced by an earlier Akira Kurosawa movie, The Hidden Fortress (1958):

https://www.bbc.com/culture/article/20160104-the-film-star-wars-stole-from

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

AHA! I DID IT! I FINISHED DEATH IN VENICE (1971)!!!

Definitely not a crowd-pleaser.  I do like slow "motionless" movies that are gorgeously shot and have beautiful music.  I consider DEATH IN VENICE an actor's piece. 

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

AHA! I DID IT! I FINISHED DEATH IN VENICE (1971)!!!

I turned it off, like, EIGHT TIMES, but it KEPT SHOWING UP IN MY HULU FEED and I kept going back to it.

image.jpg

I feel the need to preface my remarks on this film with two things:

1. I know this is a film that is near and dear to a lot of you and i respect that

and

2. it's a good movie. ITS NOT A FILM FOR EVERYONE, but I respect anyone who LOVES it.

Now I would like to say that the closest analogy I can think for it, as a film, is: it the story of a director who paints a wall on a glorious summer day on the beach** in Venice (Italy) and shoots and photographs that paint drying for two and half hours SO lovingly and with such exquisite care that every single shot of that **** paint drying could be framed and hung up in a museum. IT IS SOME GORGEOUS, BRILLIANTLY SHOT AND LIT AND DRESSED AND FRAMED PAINT DRYING that goes on FOR TWO AND A HALF(?) HOURS. And THE DIRECTOR also hires a GREAT ACTOR (DIRK BOGARDE]  to SIT THERE AND WATCH THE PAINT DRY and draws forth from him a bold, vanity-free performance of SUCH UNDENIABLE DEPTH AND PROFUNDITY (again while sits there and watches the paint dry) THAT YOU CAN'T HELP BUT BE AWED by the TALENTS OF BOTH.

Also, I could not help but think of RUDY GIULIANI and THE HAIR DYE at the end of the movie.

Also also, i was not expecting it to be SO TOPICAL with THE THEME OF A PANDEMIC that is BEING DOWNPLAYED as an UNDERCURRENT TO ALL THE LANGUID, LOVELY, AMBER-TONED, EXQUISITE PAINT DRYING.

**- re "the beach" in VENICE, so, apparently there is LAND in Venice, Italy? I mean, before this movie I truly thought it was, like 80-90% canals, but no- there is actual land and even a beach in Venice, Italy, those of you who have been, yes?

 

Congratulations.  I've never been able to get through it without falling asleep.  Maybe I should watch it in the morning.

The beach isn't in the main part of Venice itself.  It's Lido, which is a barrier island a boat ride away from Venice.  It's where the term "Lido deck" comes from on cruise ships.

The hotel is now derelict.  It's been in a perpetual redevelopment plan for years.

 

 

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