Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ALSO THE KID** AND HIS MOTHER REMINDED ME OF BARON AND MELANIA, SO I COULDN'T HELP BUT HAVE A LARF AT THAT.

 

**also a little bit of a young, less masculine JODIE FOSTER.

You're making me laugh, Lorna. Now I may have to watch this movie, or at least a few minutes of it. I've always put Death in Venice on the list of long, s-l-o-w movies that I will gladly proclaim as masterpieces if I don't actually have to watch the darn things. I remember watching The Leopard and wishing the aristocracy would decay a little faster. Maybe a lot faster.

 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

**- re "the beach" in VENICE, so, apparently there is LAND in Venice, Italy? I mean, before this movie I truly thought it was, like 80-90% canals, but no- there is actual land and even a beach in Venice, Italy, those of you who have been, yes?

 

My knowledge is very limited because I spent only four days there in the early 1970s. I believe that the main part of the city is entirely encircled by road. There was a small patch of unimproved land but I saw it from the road which acted as barrier between sea and land. Murano is a short water-taxi ride from proper Venice and there was what some might call a beach there. My memory of it is as a very polluted semi-swamp. I doubt that even the most talented filmmaker could have made it appear enticing.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been wanting to see THE LAST TEMPTATION OF CHRIST (1988) for some time. 

I came across it on Peacock streaming service. 
 

 it’s not bad, I was not expecting the dialogue to be so rudimentary and some of the acting to be so...

so...Speaking of the acting, I have a question for any of you cinephiles who have seen this one: 

(ahem)

WHAT THE **** IS GOING ON WITH HARVEY KEITEL IN THIS FILM?
 

Did Scorsese just sit him down in the screening room right after casting him and run the Tony Curtis “yondah lies dah cahstle of my fodder” scene from whatever movie that’s in and say

“NOW THIS IS WHAT I WANT FROM YOU AS JUDAS ISCARIOT, HARVEY!! Only- and this is CRUCIAL here- I want YOU to recite your lines in even MORESO GALLINGLY ANACHRONISTIC  BROOKLYNESE...like I want you to ACT EXACTLY LIKE we’re making the sequel to “MEAN STREETS” here, and we’re on location in a real sandy part of Jersey where everyones wearing burlap dresses and no ones had a haircut for months!!!!! Like Paramus, exactly.”

KEITEL’s  turn as JUDAS is really something to behold, oddly perfect in that he undeniably BETRAYS THIS MOVIE. I’m kind of surprised Scorsese got a best Director nomination when he allowsed a performance this subpar to mar a movie.

I am torn on Willem Dafoe’s performance, He has undeniable moments though.

DAVID BOWIE plays PONTIOUS PILOT as ROSALIND RUSSELL in a brief scene and it’s delicious. 

HARRY DEAN STANTON surprised me  with how good he was in his part.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

The only other Venetian set film I can think of is DONT LOOK BACK, and that one makes the city seem like one long canal. 

There's also Summertime with Katharine Hepburn.

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

There's also Summertime with Katharine Hepburn.

 

Also Joseph Losey's Eva, also known as Eve, starring Jeanne Moreau and Stanley Baker, which may be available on YouTube. There are a few shots which look like Nicolas Roeg had seen it before he made Don't Look Now. The Lido is a vaporetto ride away from the main part of Venice. Yes, there is a beach. We weren't there in the summer, so I don't know what it is like in high season. It's not on the must-see list of tourist attractions. In the earlier twentieth century the city fathers of Venice tried to encourage celebrities to come to the Lido instead of the Riviera.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

FLESHPOT ON 42nd STREET (1973) - "interesting" soft-core porn  Starring HARRY REEMS (under another name) good lead actress; cheapo. 

GURU, THE MAD MONK (1970)  - from bad to worse  I couldn't stop watching this drek. 

I was up 'til nearly 5am watching BOTH.   On TCM Underground.  ANDY MILLIGAN LIVES!!! 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

January 8
Hang 'Em High
 (United Artists, 1968)
Source: TCM

I watched three movies on Pat Hingle night, and this was the first.

I believe this was Clint Eastwood's first Hollywood Western after his trio of "spaghetti Westerns" made with Sergio Leone, I know I caught this somewhere on commercial TV in the '80s before there was a TCM. I have sharp memories of the vivid opening sequence, although I probably stopped watching as soon as it got to the first commercial break, because I didn't have any memory of the rest of the movie. And in the four months since I watched the whole thing, I've forgotten a lot of the plot specifics.

Eastwood plays an ex-lawman turned cattle rancher who is taking newly purchased cattle back to his land. We know he's a good guy because the movie opens with him wandering into a lake to retrieve a calf who has strayed, then gently carrying it out.  Then an angry mob catches up with him. The guy he just bought the cattle from has apparently been murdered, and although Eastwood has a deed for the purchase, the mob - whose members include Ed Begley, Alan Hale, Jr. and Bruce Dern - decide a little vigilante justice in order a la The Ox-Bow Incident, and string him up. Only the semi-miraculous intervention of lawman Ben Johnson saves Eastwood's life, though he's left with permanent rope burns around his neck. Johnson takes Eastwood into the nearest town, takes a couple of minutes to dispatch of attempted escapee Dennis Hopper (who gets to go full bat-S crazy in his two minutes of screen time), then turns him over to a "hanging" judge played by Hingle. More good fortune for Eastwood - his case is investigated, and he's clear of all charges. Now, he wants vengeance on the sorry SOBs who strung him up. Hingle offers to make him a marshal, but he's got to bring the lynch mob and any other ne'er-do-wells he comes across in lawfully and alive. This doesn't go so well his first time out of the gate, as Eastwood ends up having to blow the guy away (I think it was Dern). I thought this would prove to be a pattern for the entire movie and lead to confrontation between Eastwood and Hingle, but it doesn't.  I also wasn't sure what the ultimate relationship between those two characters was going to be. Hingle is so high on Eastwood to begin with, it seemed inevitable their relationship would sour. There's some kind of parallel going on between the type of justice the mob wants to mete out in the opening scene and Hingle's justice - he wants Eastwood to bring them in alive so he could rush them through a perfunctory "fair trial" and then string them up. A little odd to see Eastwood, the guy who would go on to play Dirty Harry, in a movie with an ostensibly liberal message about justice, although this was early in his stardom. I kept waiting for Hingle to become an outright villain, maybe the main villain, like Robert Vaughn in Bulitt. It's hard to follow what the real criminals are even up to in that movie, just that Vaughn is a jerk. But I guess the real villain's role belongs to Begley in this movie (did he ever play a nice guy?). Hingle gives an interesting speech about achieving statehood for Oklahoma means proving achievement of all the expectations of civilization, including firm justice. Regardless how you feel about his character, it's an electrifying performance. Probably the best one in the movie. Eastwood is fine, maybe a little softer at times than we're accustomed to. He tries to romance Inger Stevens, who has her own reasons for wanting justice, but these scenes don't really add too much to a movie that's already too long and at times funereally paced.

Anyway, a marginal thumb up for me. I'm typically not too crazy about Westerns, so any one I can make it all the way through must be pretty good.

Amazon.com: Hang 'em High: Clint Eastwood, Inger Stevens, Pat Hingle, Ed  Begley, Ben Johnson, Charles McGraw, Ruth White, Bruce Dern, Alan Hale Jr.,  Arlene Golonka, James Westerfield, Dennis Hopper, Leonard J. South,

Total movies seen this year: 14

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

January 8
The Strange One (Columbia, 1958)
Source: TCM

The second of three movies I watched on Pat Hingle night. I'll be honest right up front: I'm not sure I get this film. The movie poster with Ben Gazzara (see below) with his military cap obscuring his eyes and undershirt partially exposed seems like it would be a fit for a military version of Scorpio Rising. And from what I'm reading, there was enough of a homoerotic context to rile up the Production Code on more than one occasion before the film's release. It was written by Calder Willingham, adapted from his own play, End as a Man.

Gazzara had already played Brick in the stage production of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof which, I've read, is a lot gayer than the movie. Here, in his film debut, he plays a sociopathic student at a Southern military academy. He seems to live for breaking the rules, though rather than doing so directly, he's intuitive enough to manipulate everyone around him into doing it for him. This includes his roommate (Hingle) and two underclassmen who are roommates (one of whom is played by George Peppard). In the opening sequence, Gazzara manipulates the others into setting up a fixed poker game during bed-check, getting a dim-bulb cadet who's quick to anger when drunk to beat up another cadet who happens to be the son of the academy's commanding officer. The rest of the movie is kind of a cat-and-mouse game between Gazzara and the other cadets who are either unwilling or unknowing participants. As one poster on imdb says, there's a comeuppance at the end, though it's not particularly satisfying. I guess the most homoerotic undercurrent appears in the form of another cadet who hero-worships Gazzara to the point of writing a thinly disguised novel of his life that sounds like a love letter, the parts we get to hear, even though Gazzara is abusive to him. 

Any implications of homosexuality no doubt made the Production Code uncomfortable. I personally am sorry to see that it has to be so tied into a sort of S&M vibe and a cruelty vibe, as if that's the only way it can be expressed. Most of the reviews I read are glowing. Not really my kind of movie, but the acting is strong, and if what I've written intrigues you, then please check it out. Hingle is a good-natured lunkhead in this one, not a very challenging role. It was pretty early in his career, I guess.

The Strange One (1957) - IMDb

Total movies seen this year: 15

 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, MrMagoo said:

Totally agree. This may sound off to some, but, to me, there are similar scenes in Star Wars. I hardly doubt Kurosawa copied Lucas, as Star Wars came out first. Just that great film makers know how to do big scenes. 

 

I've largely become accustomed to our new world of home viewing, and I don't watch comic book movies that probably play better on a big screen with Dolby surround.  This was the first time in a while, watching "Ran", that I found myself actively wishing I could see it in a theater.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Vidor said:

 

I've largely become accustomed to our new world of home viewing, and I don't watch comic book movies that probably play better on a big screen with Dolby surround.  This was the first time in a while, watching "Ran", that I found myself actively wishing I could see it in a theater.

That last shot of RAN will stay with me for life. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Vidor said:

 

I've largely become accustomed to our new world of home viewing, and I don't watch comic book movies that probably play better on a big screen with Dolby surround.  This was the first time in a while, watching "Ran", that I found myself actively wishing I could see it in a theater.

I first saw RAN in a little, country theater in NW CT. It was not a big screen. It showed a lot of independent, and art house movies. My wife and I went with another, older couple who were real cinephiles and when I mentioned how I thought there were some STAR WAR like scenes in there, they scoffed. Thank you all for affirming me!

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

The Strange One (1957) - IMDb

Total movies seen this year: 15

Haha, as that poster rose on my monitor, seeing just the top line & graphic thought it said, "The most fascinating Louise you ever met" The figure reminds me of Glen or Glenda & look at the tree cameo! I'd say this movie's intentionally lavender.

Keep up the good work sewhite, you've watched several movies that are new to me.

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Apropos of nothing, I happened to flip on "CBS Sunday Morning" for the first time in about a million years.  Who was on?  Ben Mankiewicz, that's who.  He was discussing "Love Story" and interviewing O'Neal and MacGraw.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Michael Collins (1996), written and directed by Neil Jordan, starring Liam Neeson, Aidan Quinn, Alan Rickman, Julia Roberts, and Stephen Rea

Source: DVD

Michael Collins (1890-1922) was an Irish revolutionary leader who was instrumental in the fight for Irish independence, mostly as a military organizer, then, reluctantly, as a political operative. The film covers the period from the Easter Rising (1916) through Bloody Sunday (1920) to Collins' assassination in 1922.

It's a sprawling, good movie, (Oscar-nominated score and cinematography), which largely accords heroic status to Collins. Like most movies based on history, it does take liberties, and has been criticized for that. An unforgivable alternation, though, is the torture and murder by the British of Ned Broy (played by Stephen Rea). Broy actually lived until 1972, serving the Irish government in many capacities. (This reminds me of the death of Louis Leonowens in Anna and the King of Siam. I understand that these films are not documentaries, but why kill off a character -- Anna's son -- based on a historic personage who lives to relative old age?)

Despite the necessarily broad canvas of the movie, the leading characters are generally well drawn, and one gets a sense of their complexity. Aidan Quinn is particularly good as Harry Boland, Collins' closest friend and collaborator, from whom he later becomes estranged. One flaw, though, is the character of Kitty, whom Boland and Collins both fall in love with (Collins wins her hand). At the end of the film, Kitty's selection of her wedding dress is intercut with scenes of  Collins assassination. That's a pretty effective device, which conveys the sadness of the contrast of the ordinary lives of the Irish people of that time, with the realities of ever-present violence. Nevertheless, Kitty is often seen coming into rooms in awkward (for the film) interludes with her boyfriends, and one want to cry out, "What the hell is Julia Roberts doing in this movie?" 

One of the most powerful scenes in the film is the depiction of Bloody Sunday, one of the tragic events in Irish history. The day begins with the murder, by Collins' comrades and under his direction, of British military leaders in Ireland. It continues with the slaughter, by the British, of football players and spectators at a football match in Croke Park, Dublin.  That's a terrifying scene: the crowd enjoying the game, when tanks roll in and start shooting. (Those British can be nasty. The scene reminds me of the 1919 massacre, ordered by Acting Brigadier-General Reginald Dyer, of unarmed Indians attending a festival at Jallianwalla Bagh in the Punjab). On the other hand, there are scenes of normal life, including a beautifully shot dance scene. There is also a powerful scene in the self-proclaimed Irish parliament, when de Valera and Boland and others walk out in protest to the settlement Collins has negotiated in London. (Collins had been sent to London by de Valera. Collins complains that he is not a diplomat. The film depicts the assignment given by de Valera to Collins as a setup for inevitable failure.)

In 1966, Eamon de Valera (1882-1975), who had served several terms as Irish Taoiseach/Prime Minister, said:  “It is my considered opinion that in the fullness of time history will record the greatness of Michael Collins and it will be recorded at my expense.” That is largely what Neil Jordan's film does: Collins (played by Liam Neeson) is depicted as a hero, whose commitment to violence is a reluctant but necessary route to getting the British out of Ireland.  On the other hand, de Valera (played by Alan Rickman) is depicted as Machiavellian and deceitful. The film even hints that de Valera may have been complicit in Collins' assassination.

Michael Collins was filmed in Dublin and other locations around Ireland.

michael-collins

de Valera, Collins, Boland

image.jpg

Kitty with her two admirers

 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Swithin, I also thought that Michael Collins was a good film. Neil Jordan has made a number of interesting films, a point underlined by the diversity of favorite Jordan films different people mentioned on Det. Jim McLeod's thread.

Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Swithin, I also thought that Michael Collins was a good film. Neil Jordan has made a number of interesting films, a point underlined by the diversity of favorite Jordan films different people mentioned on Det. Jim McLeod's thread.

A REALLY INTERESTING NEIL JORDAN film I saw a little while back was a very early one of his- 1984's THE COMPANY OF WOLVES, which is a revisionist RED RIDING HOOD and was also excellent and stylistically ahead of its time. ANGELA LANSBURY has a part as Grandmama.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

i started watching SLAP SHOT (1977) because I am trying to see more 70's films and sports films.

slap_shot-poster-3.jpg

it's a movie about minor league hockey, the same premise as 1988's MAJOR LEAGUE more or less- a sports team gets wind that they're for sale, so they up their game to get some butts in the seats.

it was written by a woman, and was included in the FILMS BY WOMEN showcase on the PEACOCK streaming service- so I kept that in mind as the film turned into A CLOCKWORK ORANGE ON ICE- a slickly constructed, confident glorification of violence and the culture of violence, salted and dressed in such a way as to be greatly digestive to said culture. the women's roles weren't terrible and there were some humorous moments.

and then...

VERYCLOSE to the end of this film, the "HERO" played by PAUL NEWMAN makes a cruel, explicit, homophobic and HIGHLY sexual remark about a character's EIGHT YEAR OLD SON, SERIOUSLY, THE KIND OF THING THAT COULD END YOU UP IN JAIL OR WITH A FRACTURED SKULL IF YOU SAID IT TO THE WRONG PERSON- AND FOR THAT MATTER, BOY, DO I EVER WISH YOU WOULD!

[I'D REPEAT THE REMARK HERE TO GIVE YOU ALL CONTEXT, BUT HONESTLY, IT'S SO DEGRADING AND FILTHY IT'S NOT WORTH SHARING.]

It was one of the most breathtakingly insulting things I can recall seeing since the OLE ABE LINCOLN scene in HOLIDAY INN.

AND IT STUNG.

And it made me remember what it felt like growing up in the 80s and 90s and seeing **** like this that just reinforced the self loathing that was already there.

And at that point, just as if I had been on an hour and twenty minute long first date with someone not entirely unattractive or unable to hold a conversation who had just remarked to me that "YOU KNOW, Q-ANON MAKES SOME REALLY VALID POINTS, ESPECIALLY ABOUT THE JEWISH SPACE LASERS" i upped and "NOPE"ED THE **** OUT OF THAT SITUATION.

I don't know how SLAP SHOT ends and I don't care and as far as I'm concerned PAUL NEWMAN can take a bottle of CREAMY CAESAR and RAM it. [edit- i was so p!ssed when i wrote this, i forgot he's dead.)

In reading up about the movie, I can't find any discussion at all of this particular scene, again the specifics of which I would just rather not repeat here (I thought about starting my own thread about it, but decided not to.)

in re: the female screenwriter there is no homophobia that I find quite so appalling as the homophobia of "cool girls."

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

A REALLY INTERESTING NEIL JORDAN film I saw a little while back was a very early one of his- 1984's THE COMPANY OF WOLVES, which is a revisionist RED RIDING HOOD and was also excellent and stylistically ahead of its time. ANGELA LANSBURY has a part as Grandmama.

That film made me go home and trim my eyebrows (i.e. the space between them)! 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i started watching SLAP SHOT (1977) because I am trying to see more 70's films and sports films.

slap_shot-poster-3.jpg

it's a movie about minor league hockey, the same premise as 1988's MAJOR LEAGUE more or less- a sports team gets wind that they're for sale, so they up their game to get some butts in the seats.

it was written by a woman, and was included in the FILMS BY WOMEN showcase on the PEACOCK streaming service- so I kept that in mind as the film turned into A CLOCKWORK ORANGE ON ICE- a slickly constructed, confident glorification of violence and the culture of violence, salted and dressed in such a way as to be greatly digestive to said culture. the women's roles weren't terrible and there were some humorous moments.

and then...

VERYCLOSE to the end of this film, the "HERO" played by PAUL NEWMAN makes a cruel, explicit, homophobic and HIGHLY sexual remark about a character's EIGHT YEAR OLD SON, SERIOUSLY, THE KIND OF THING THAT COULD END YOU UP IN JAIL OR WITH A FRACTURED SKULL IF YOU SAID IT TO THE WRONG PERSON- AND FOR THAT MATTER, BOY, DO I EVER WISH YOU WOULD!

[I'D REPEAT THE REMARK HERE TO GIVE YOU ALL CONTEXT, BUT HONESTLY, IT'S SO DEGRADING AND FILTHY IT'S NOT WORTH SHARING.]

It was one of the most breathtakingly insulting things I can recall seeing since the OLE ABE LINCOLN scene in HOLIDAY INN.

AND IT STUNG.

And it made me remember what it felt like growing up in the 80s and 90s and seeing **** like this that just reinforced the self loathing that was already there.

And at that point, just as if I had been on an hour and twenty minute long first date with someone not entirely unattractive or unable to hold a conversation who had just remarked to me that "YOU KNOW, Q-ANON MAKES SOME REALLY VALID POINTS, ESPECIALLY ABOUT THE JEWISH SPACE LASERS" i upped and "NOPE"ED THE **** OUT OF THAT SITUATION.

I don't know how SLAP SHOT ends and I don't care and as far as I'm concerned PAUL NEWMAN can take a bottle of CREAMY CAESAR and RAM it. [edit- i was so p!ssed when i wrote this, i forgot he's dead.)

In reading up about the movie, I can't find any discussion at all of this particular scene, again the specifics of which I would just rather not repeat here (I thought about starting my own thread about it, but decided not to.)

in re: the female screenwriter there is no homophobia that I find quite so appalling as the homophobia of "cool girls."

Had no desire to see this particular film anyway. At the time of its release, it was regarded as having one of the dirtiest scripts ever put on the screen. It didn't work out for Nancy Dowd,  the woman who wrote the script; she got an Oscar out of Coming Home for concocting the original story, but very little of her original draft ended up in the film, her script for Swing Shift was changed enough to make her take a male pseudonym, and she has not recorded any work on any film since 1989.

Just for the record, the ending of the film is famous, even to those who haven't seen it, Newman, encouraging his players to play it dirty as ever, has his star player Michael Ontkean do a striptease on the ice, ending with Ontkean in just a jockstrap that exposes his  a*s*s*. They win the game, but the teams folds just afterward.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...