Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, kingrat said:

Swithin, I also thought that Michael Collins was a good film. Neil Jordan has made a number of interesting films, a point underlined by the diversity of favorite Jordan films different people mentioned on Det. Jim McLeod's thread.

I remember picking The End of the Affair in that particular thread, but I'm also quite fond of Michael Collins and Mona Lisa. Jordan's films in the 80s and 90s had a truly particular voice in the 80s and 90s that was rather alluring. His more recent career has been quieter, but his 2018 film Greta, an update of the psycho-biddy genre of the 1960s is an absolute hoot of a film, perched somewhere between  modern urban gothic thriller and outrageous dark comedy. I can't think of any other film where a murderess shoots somebody dead and then starts ballet dancing after firing the bullets.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I have been wanting to see THE LAST TEMPTATION OF CHRIST (1988) for some time. 

I came across it on Peacock streaming service. 
 

 it’s not bad, I was not expecting the dialogue to be so rudimentary and some of the acting to be so...

so...Speaking of the acting, I have a question for any of you cinephiles who have seen this one: 

(ahem)

WHAT THE **** IS GOING ON WITH HARVEY KEITEL IN THIS FILM?

KEITEL’s  turn as JUDAS is really something to behold, oddly perfect in that he undeniably BETRAYS THIS MOVIE. I’m kind of surprised Scorsese got a best Director nomination when he allowsed a performance this subpar to mar a movie.

While Martin Scorsese was up for an Oscar for directing The Last Temptation of Christ, Harvey Keitel received a nomination for Worst Supporting Actor of 1988 at the Razzies for playing Judas. He lost to Dan Aykroyd in Caddyshack II. [The other men up for that Razzie were Billy Barty in Willow, Christopher Reeve in Switching Channels {which was the umpteenth remake of The Front Page}, and Richard Crenna in Rambo III]

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

While Martin Scorsese was up for an Oscar for directing The Last Temptation of Christ, Harvey Keitel received a nomination for Worst Supporting Actor of 1988 at the Razzies for playing Judas. He lost to Dan Aykroyd in Caddyshack II. [The other men up for that Razzie were Billy Barty in Willow, Christopher Reeve in Switching Channels {which was the umpteenth remake of The Front Page}, and Richard Crenna in Rambo III]

WHAT?!?!?!

BILLY BARTY WAS *GREAT* IN WILLOW!!!!!!

PHILISTINES!!!!!!! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I saw SLAP SHOT about the time it came out and don't remember any particular scenes. I thought the hockey was feeble, the characters were horrific stereotypes and the plot was moronic. What the h*** was Paul Newman thinking? 

How do such things get made? What must a studio or producer be thinking?

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, MrMagoo said:

I saw SLAP SHOT about the time it came out and don't remember any particular scenes. I thought the hockey was feeble, the characters were horrific stereotypes and the plot was moronic. What the h*** was Paul Newman thinking? 

How do such things get made? What must a studio or producer be thinking?

It was pretty successful, made about $26 million (Which in those days was a pretty tidy sum) and even had two sequels in the 2000s (minus Newman.)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

It was pretty successful, made about $26 million (Which in those days was a pretty tidy sum) and even had two sequels in the 2000s (minus Newman.)

Stupid is as stupid does.

It's an interesting era. I was in my early 20's, just finishing then out of college. Just getting started. Disco. DALLAS. It was all a blur to me as I was so consumed with work. The late 70's into the 80's was a lost decade for me....cinema wise. 

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Had no desire to see this particular film anyway. At the time of its release, it was regarded as having one of the dirtiest scripts ever put on the screen. It didn't work out for Nancy Dowd,  the woman who wrote the script; she got an Oscar out of Coming Home for concocting the original story, but very little of her original draft ended up in the film, her script for Swing Shift was changed enough to make her take a male pseudonym, and she has not recorded any work on any film since 1989.

Just for the record, the ending of the film is famous, even to those who haven't seen it, Newman, encouraging his players to play it dirty as ever, has his star player Michael Ontkean do a striptease on the ice, ending with Ontkean in just a jockstrap that exposes his  a*s*s*. They win the game, but the teams folds just afterward.

Although I have no interest in seeing Slap Shot, I might need to watch the last few minutes just to see such a profound, brilliantly crafted, deeply moving ending.

  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently watched Alien in memory of Yaphet Kotto, one of my favorite black actors. Another movie of his that I like, a forgotten favorite, is Report to the Commissioner. It sort of reminds me of The French Connection in terms of the gritty feel to it. I'm a fan of those kinds of cop movies. Yaphet Kotto is great in this, no surprise. 

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i started watching SLAP SHOT (1977) ...the film turned into A CLOCKWORK ORANGE ON ICE- a slickly constructed, confident glorification of violence and the culture of violence, salted and dressed in such a way as to be greatly digestive to said culture.

 

This is a curious way to characterize "Slap Shot".  The violence of the hockey team is characterized throughout as embarrassing and ridiculous, even as it helps them win games, and of course in the end the Michael Ontkean character simply refuses to goon it up anymore and publicly protests.  This film was in no way a glorification of violence.  I don't remember the offensive comment you alluded to, but if one wanted to object to something on grounds of political correctness I'd think one would mention Melinda Dillon's topless scene, which has nothing to do with the arc of the story and is plainly "hey, here are some breasts."

 

As much as some folks might not like to admit it violence is a part of hockey.  In every other North American sport you get ejected for fighting but in the NHL you can get in a fight and come back in the game after a short penalty.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

A KID FOR TWO FARTHINGS (1955)

I first saw this movie a few years ago when it aired on TCM as an Essentials Jr selection. I’ve been wanting to re-watch it for a while now. The last time I saw it, I ended up sobbing like a baby by the end of it so I wasn’t sure if I was ready for another blubber-fest.  I don’t usually cry at movies, but if any movie can make me cry, it’s one about animals!  

The movie’s title refers to “Chad Gadya”[One Little Goat],  a favorite song of mine from childhood. (One of the characters sings a bit of the song in English at the end of the movie.) With Passover approaching, the song and the movie have been on my mind. So I finally took my chances on a repeat of the waterworks and re-watched the movie this weekend.

A KID FOR TWO FARTHINGS is the first color movie from English director Carol Reed, with a screenplay by Wolf Mankowitz, adapted from his novel of the same name. It’s set in London’s East End after World War II (specifically the 1950s --- which means the movie was not a “period piece” when it was released but rather a contemporary tale). The story focuses on a boy who lives with his mother above the trouser-maker’s East End shop where she works. The boy’s father is absent, working in South Africa for the past two years (supposedly securing enough to send for his wife and son) so the trouser maker Mr. Kandinsky serves as a father figure to the boy.  The boy (whose name is Joe) is so captivated by Kandinsky’s stories about wish-granting unicorns that he believes he has purchased one when he buys a baby goat with a single deformed horn.

It’s a sentimental movie, but it pulled me in once again on my second viewing. Yes, the boy’s accent is much too “posh” (as the English would say) for a working class (or even a middle class) London child, but the emotional performance that Carol Reed was able to draw from him is so captivatingly real.  Of course, Reed had previously worked his directorial magic on a non-actor child in his more well-known THE FALLEN IDOL.

The movie was shot at England’s Shepperton Studios as well as on location in Petticoat Lane in London’s East End, which at the time of the filming was a thriving Jewish community.  The segment where Joe buys the goat near the opening of the bridge, for example, was shot near the street markets. One of my favorite parts of the movie --- where Joe chases the runaway goat through the market stalls --- appears to have been at least partially filmed on location.  The footage during the chase definitely has a pseudo-documentary look and the ambient sounds seem quite real.

By the way, Joe actually pays 3 shillings and 9 pence halfpenny for the “unicorn.”  But two farthings does sound more like the two zuzim from “Chad Gadya.”

image-w448.jpg?1445909412

 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/18/2021 at 9:53 AM, TomJH said:

Thanks, you did. By the way, I agree with you about the sentimental but touching On Borrowed Time. Lionel Barrymore is wonderful in it and there's never been a screen crier quite like Bobs Watson. This film used to come on TV a lot when I was a kid. It's one of my earliest film watching memories.

The other night I watched MARY OF SCOTLAND (1936)  just to revisit another Hepburn masterpiece. We all know the story and how it ends. I did not sit through every scene and listen to every word of dialog. I just went back and forth and watched beautiful scene after beautiful scene. Fabulous set pieces. Elegant dialog...DIALOG! DIALOG! DIALOG! A black and white film with outstanding lighting and elegant camera angles. Simply, a work of art. The ending when Mary is executed is a beautiful scene. Like the ending to a great operatic aria.....Nessum Dorma comes to mind. 

The reason I bother bringing it up is that about 3/4 the way through there's a modest little scene with Mary (Hepburn) sitting at a table across from a little boy. Who is that little boy? Why none other than the terrific little, Bobs Watson! And no...he didn't cry in this scene.

That kid had a fine a little career. Shared the screen with some real big shots. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, MrMagoo said:

The other night I watched MARY OF SCOTLAND (1936)  just to revisit another Hepburn masterpiece. We all know the story and how it ends. I did not sit through every scene and listen to every word of dialog. I just went back and forth and watched beautiful scene after beautiful scene. Fabulous set pieces. Elegant dialog...DIALOG! DIALOG! DIALOG! A black and white film with outstanding lighting and elegant camera angles. Simply, a work of art. The ending when Mary is executed is a beautiful scene. Like the ending to a great operatic aria.....Nessum Dorma comes to mind. 

The reason I bother bringing it up is that about 3/4 the way through there's a modest little scene with Mary (Hepburn) sitting at a table across from a little boy. Who is that little boy? Why none other than the terrific little, Bobs Watson! And no...he didn't cry in this scene.

That kid had a fine a little career. Shared the screen with some real big shots. 

 

Bobs Watson deaths in the movies seem to inspire other characters in those films to change. In BOYS TOWN a weepy Mickey Rooney changes from a tough mug into a reformed kid and in DODGE CITY Errol Flynn becomes a town sheriff after an innocent Bobs is killed as a result of gunfire.

Mickey_Rooney_42.jpg

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/20/2021 at 11:18 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

AHA! I DID IT! I FINISHED DEATH IN VENICE (1971)!!!

I turned it off, like, EIGHT TIMES, but it KEPT SHOWING UP IN MY HULU FEED and I kept going back to it.

image.jpg

I feel the need to preface my remarks on this film with two things:

1. I know this is a film that is near and dear to a lot of you and i respect that

and

2. it's a good movie. ITS NOT A FILM FOR EVERYONE, but I respect anyone who LOVES it.

Now I would like to say that the closest analogy I can think for it, as a film, is: it the story of a director who paints a wall on a glorious summer day on the beach** in Venice (Italy) and shoots and photographs that paint drying for two and half hours SO lovingly and with such exquisite care that every single shot of that **** paint drying could be framed and hung up in a museum. IT IS SOME GORGEOUS, BRILLIANTLY SHOT AND LIT AND DRESSED AND FRAMED PAINT DRYING that goes on FOR TWO AND A HALF(?) HOURS. And THE DIRECTOR also hires a GREAT ACTOR (DIRK BOGARDE]  to SIT THERE AND WATCH THE PAINT DRY and draws forth from him a bold, vanity-free performance of SUCH UNDENIABLE DEPTH AND PROFUNDITY (again while sits there and watches the paint dry) THAT YOU CAN'T HELP BUT BE AWED by the TALENTS OF BOTH.

Also, I could not help but think of RUDY GIULIANI and THE HAIR DYE at the end of the movie.

Also also, i was not expecting it to be SO TOPICAL with THE THEME OF A PANDEMIC that is BEING DOWNPLAYED as an UNDERCURRENT TO ALL THE LANGUID, LOVELY, AMBER-TONED, EXQUISITE PAINT DRYING.

**- re "the beach" in VENICE, so, apparently there is LAND in Venice, Italy? I mean, before this movie I truly thought it was, like 80-90% canals, but no- there is actual land and even a beach in Venice, Italy, those of you who have been, yes?

 

Now that's perserverance!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, I've been taking in the multi-part "mini series"  GENIUS:ARETHA  on NetGeo.  the last few nights.  It's an interesting insight to the background and rise to fame of Detroit's "Queen of Soul" pride and joy.  

CYNTHIA ERIVO as the adult Aretha does an excellent job with young SHAIA JORDAN, as the adolescent Aretha  matching "chops for chops" with Erivo.  And COURTNEY B. VANCE  as Rev. C. L. Franklin rounds out a cast that's truly up to the task.  So far, this long time Aretha fan isn't disappointed.

Sepiatone

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/21/2021 at 8:16 PM, kingrat said:

Although I have no interest in seeing Slap Shot, I might need to watch the last few minutes just to see such a profound, brilliantly crafted, deeply moving ending.

Yeah, I'd watch it just for that! LOL.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/21/2021 at 3:13 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

i started watching SLAP SHOT (1977) because I am trying to see more 70's films and sports films.

slap_shot-poster-3.jpg

it's a movie about minor league hockey, the same premise as 1988's MAJOR LEAGUE more or less- a sports team gets wind that they're for sale, so they up their game to get some butts in the seats.

it was written by a woman, and was included in the FILMS BY WOMEN showcase on the PEACOCK streaming service- so I kept that in mind as the film turned into A CLOCKWORK ORANGE ON ICE- a slickly constructed, confident glorification of violence and the culture of violence, salted and dressed in such a way as to be greatly digestive to said culture. the women's roles weren't terrible and there were some humorous moments.

and then...

VERYCLOSE to the end of this film, the "HERO" played by PAUL NEWMAN makes a cruel, explicit, homophobic and HIGHLY sexual remark about a character's EIGHT YEAR OLD SON, SERIOUSLY, THE KIND OF THING THAT COULD END YOU UP IN JAIL OR WITH A FRACTURED SKULL IF YOU SAID IT TO THE WRONG PERSON- AND FOR THAT MATTER, BOY, DO I EVER WISH YOU WOULD!

[I'D REPEAT THE REMARK HERE TO GIVE YOU ALL CONTEXT, BUT HONESTLY, IT'S SO DEGRADING AND FILTHY IT'S NOT WORTH SHARING.]

It was one of the most breathtakingly insulting things I can recall seeing since the OLE ABE LINCOLN scene in HOLIDAY INN.

AND IT STUNG.

And it made me remember what it felt like growing up in the 80s and 90s and seeing **** like this that just reinforced the self loathing that was already there.

And at that point, just as if I had been on an hour and twenty minute long first date with someone not entirely unattractive or unable to hold a conversation who had just remarked to me that "YOU KNOW, Q-ANON MAKES SOME REALLY VALID POINTS, ESPECIALLY ABOUT THE JEWISH SPACE LASERS" i upped and "NOPE"ED THE **** OUT OF THAT SITUATION.

I don't know how SLAP SHOT ends and I don't care and as far as I'm concerned PAUL NEWMAN can take a bottle of CREAMY CAESAR and RAM it. [edit- i was so p!ssed when i wrote this, i forgot he's dead.)

In reading up about the movie, I can't find any discussion at all of this particular scene, again the specifics of which I would just rather not repeat here (I thought about starting my own thread about it, but decided not to.)

in re: the female screenwriter there is no homophobia that I find quite so appalling as the homophobia of "cool girls."

Can you pm me what he said???? I've got to know!

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/19/2021 at 7:18 PM, Fedya said:

I was going to say I enjoyed A Matter of Time, until I realized that you were talking about a completely different movie, and the movie I was thinking of was Time After Time, about HG Wells and Jack the Ripper in 1970s San Francisco.

YES!

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Actually, I've been taking in the multi-part "mini series"  GENIUS:ARETHA  on NetGeo.  the last few nights.  It's an interesting insight to the background and rise to fame of Detroit's "Queen of Soul" pride and joy.  

CYNTHIA ERIVO as the adult Aretha does an excellent job with young SHAIA JORDAN, as the adolescent Aretha  matching "chops for chops" with Erivo.  And COURTNEY B. VANCE  as Rev. C. L. Franklin rounds out a cast that's truly up to the task.  So far, this long time Aretha fan isn't disappointed.

Sepiatone

As an AF fan myself you might enjoy these as well.

One of the most thoughtful remembrances of Aretha Franklin  was by Mark Steyn.

I share it here.

Think: Steyn's Song of the Week #332 :: SteynOnlinepenned 

I'd also encourage anyone to watch the 2018 documentary AMAZING GRACE filmed in 1972 and directed by Sidney Pollack. It's wonderful.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Hibi said:

Can you pm me what he said???? I've got to know!

The only thing which I can find which might be appropriate is an exchange listed on the: IMDb.com 'quotes' page for the movie.

 https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0076723/quotes/?tab=qt&ref_=tt_trv_qu It is approx. one-fourth down the page. It is between: Reggie Dunlop and: Anita McCambridge. 

I personally find it crude and insensitive but not rising much above the general crudeness and insensitivity of the entire movie.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Actually, I've been taking in the multi-part "mini series"  GENIUS:ARETHA  on NetGeo.  the last few nights.  It's an interesting insight to the background and rise to fame of Detroit's "Queen of Soul" pride and joy.  

CYNTHIA ERIVO as the adult Aretha does an excellent job with young SHAIA JORDAN, as the adolescent Aretha  matching "chops for chops" with Erivo.  And COURTNEY B. VANCE  as Rev. C. L. Franklin rounds out a cast that's truly up to the task.  So far, this long time Aretha fan isn't disappointed.

Sepiatone

Haven't seen that yet, but I'm quite intrigued by it, as both of a fan of Aretha Franklin, and as someone who thinks that Cynthia Erivo is a riveting new presence in films. I've only seen her in two films, the twisty, violent neo-noir Bad Times at the El Royale and the biopic Harriet, but both times she blew me away with brilliant performances (and the films were marvelous too.) Plus she has a singing voice like an angel.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/21/2021 at 5:11 PM, CinemaInternational said:

Had no desire to see this particular film anyway. At the time of its release, it was regarded as having one of the dirtiest scripts ever put on the screen.

That movie, and The Last Detail were heavily promoted for their raunchy 70's pottymouths in the ad campaigns.  Still not raising any curiosity for me, even though there's very little Golden-Age 1973-75 cinema could say that would shock 2021 Twitter.  Especially for the str8, who don't go into moral outrages or jihadic campaigns for tolerance.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/21/2021 at 8:16 PM, kingrat said:

Although I have no interest in seeing Slap Shot, I might need to watch the last few minutes just to see such a profound, brilliantly crafted, deeply moving ending.

since SLAP SHOT and jockstraps have been mentioned, one of the other problematic moments in the film was a subplot that the TEAM MANAGER PLAYED BY STROTHER MARTIN was once caught in a hotel room by coach PAUL NEWMAN wearing (and i more or less quote) "a black bra with tassles and a zebra skin jockstrap" and then he proceeded to come on to NEWMAN'S CHARACTER.

There's a lot of offensive stuff to parse here, the blackmail, the confusing of cross dressing [which is a straight thing] and homosexuality, but most of all: there is no such thing as a zebra skin jock strap. I just don't believe it exists. and i even went online and looked.

furthermore, fellow homosexuals, would ANY of you EVER EVER EVER have the lack of decency to wear such a thing, and one paired with a black bra with tassles no less?

you match the shoes to the purse OR YOU GET THE HELL OUT OF HERE NOW!!!!!!

  • Like 1
  • Haha 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Didn't mention the other day, but I had the misfortune of seeing one of the worst films I have ever seen. It was a 1997 film called The End of Violence, which sounded OK on the surface, a film from a usually quality director (Wim Wenders of Paris, Texas and Wings of Desire) and a decent cast with a story that was reaching for something relevant about society , but a film that was extremely muddled, confusing, unbelievable, poorly scripted, incoherent, and based on all the sudden jarring cuts in the editing, likely cut and edited by Lizzie Borden.  I couldn't wait for the end of the film.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...