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38 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I never saw this movie before but I had to rent it on demand to see what the fuss is about. It was profane, raucous and HILARIOUS!. I haven't laughed this much at a movie in years! I just found it to be a satire on the violent world of win-at-costs sports. 

I wasn't offended by the remark by Paul Newman's character about the son, the kid wasn't even in the scene. I sometimes get offended by things in real life, not in 44 year old fictional movies. I am not bothered by the Abe Lincoln scene in Holiday Inn either.

As a fan of the sport of hockey since childhood( Go Wings!!)   I quickly "got" the send-up of the violence in the sport and it's importance to possibly the survival of minor-junior league hockey.  And the "macho" behavior of the players in those leagues.   It's crystal clear the producers, writers and the director weren't shooting for the "high art" certain  cinematic elitists in these boards diss it for.   Just a good time romp for both the audience AND the cast.    As for the ABE LINCOLN scene in "Holiday Inn"......

I recall what a black guy I worked with said about white actors in blackface in old movies .....

"It don't matter how much shoe polish some h o n k y smears on his face, he STILL won't ever truly be BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL!  :D   And anyway,"  he went on...." Don't people be saying 'imitation is the sincerest form of flattery'?  "  ;) 

Sepiatone

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1 hour ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I never saw this movie before but I had to rent it on demand to see what the fuss is about. It was profane, raucous and HILARIOUS!. I haven't laughed this much at a movie in years! I just found it to be a satire on the violent world of win-at-costs sports. 

I wasn't offended by the remark by Paul Newman's character about the son, the kid wasn't even in the scene. I sometimes get offended by things in real life, not in 44 year old fictional movies. I am not bothered by the Abe Lincoln scene in Holiday Inn either.

Nuthin like a bad review from me to drum up some business for a movie!!

I’m like the Bosely Crowther of this site!

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

BTW, CAN ANYONE EXPLAIN WHAT THIS CURIOUS ENCLOSURE THAT FIGURED PROMINENTLY IN THE MOVIE IS EXACTLY? I am QUITE CURIOUS to know.

ryansdaughter02.jpg

I can't remember, but I think it was linked to the military. Some sort of storage thingie? (LOL) I can't see the whole thing.

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51 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I can't remember, but I think it was linked to the military. Some sort of storage thingie? (LOL) I can't see the whole thing.

it was quite curious. i wondered if the fishermen used it to store boats on the beach and keep them from floating out with the tide, but then I think of THE STORM and that seems futile. and damned if i know what the big, rusty kerosene tank is all about.

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9 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

came across this and HAD TO SHARE:

 

That's so sad! But it's nice to see the young Melvyn Bragg, whom I listen to regularly whilst I'm on the treadmill. His "In Our Time" podcasts about every subject imaginable are great for passing the time.

 

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17 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

it was quite curious. i wondered if the fishermen used it to store boats on the beach and keep them from floating out with the tide, but then I think of THE STORM and that seems futile. and damned if i know what the big, rusty kerosene tank is all about.

I'll have to look at it again more closely next time I watch it. It looked like something that may have washed ashore from some cargo ship or something.

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4 hours ago, MrMagoo said:

No problem with your take. I just felt the tight, taut editing, especially during the sewer chase sequences, needed a sharp, crisp score. Strings...some horns. But then...they didn't ask me.😁

You wanted something traditional. Got me thinking, who in England might have been available, and William Walton's name came to mind. Film scoring wouldn't have been new to him, but he was slower than snail poop.

Julian Bream, for whom Walton wrote some beautiful guitar works, said Walton was famous for getting up in the morning, writing down three notes, then coming back in the evening and rubbing out one.

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"The Third Man Theme" was extremely popular as a single in both Europe and the US.  It was #1 on the Billboard  Best Seller list for 11 weeks in 1950, and ended up as the #3 song overall for the year (behind "Goodnight Irene" and "Mona Lisa")

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Billboard_number-one_singles_from_1950_to_1958

As to a more traditional score composer, maybe Benjamin Britten or Ralph Vaughan Williams?

Reed definitely didn't want traditional Viennese orchestral music (doesn't seem appropriate given the city's condition after the war, does it?)  At times, I find the zither score a tad overpowering and too loud, but mostly think it fits the film.  

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Regarding critics going after Ryan's Daugther, I think it was because of the moment in society at the time.....a lot of old-fashioned films ran into a lot of trouble from critics at the time and at the box office. See also Blake Edwards' Darling Lili the same year.

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15 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Regarding critics going after Ryan's Daugther, I think it was because of the moment in society at the time.....a lot of old-fashioned films ran into a lot of trouble from critics at the time and at the box office. See also Blake Edwards' Darling Lili the same year.

Darling Lili had.....a LOT more problems than just being "old-fashioned".  😣

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In one of his negative reviews (he seems to have written two) of Ryan's Daughter, New York Times critic Vincent Canby opened with:

"IF it's true, as one reviewer has written, that every frame of David Lean's new film, "Ryan's Daughter," is "a work of pure and undiluted genius," there are, according to my calculations, approximately 276,480 works of pure and undiluted genius in the 192-minute movie, which should put "Ryan's Daughter" on a par with such other repositories as the Louvre, the Metropolitan Museum and the Hermitage."

https://www.nytimes.com/1970/11/22/archives/thoroughly-romantic-rosythoroughly-romantic-rosy.html

So who is the reviewer whom Canby is referring to? Possibly the Daily News critic?

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1 hour ago, CinemaInternational said:

Regarding critics going after Ryan's Daugther, I think it was because of the moment in society at the time.....a lot of old-fashioned films ran into a lot of trouble from critics at the time and at the box office. See also Blake Edwards' Darling Lili the same year.

Yes, it had the "uncool" factor. When I saw Hello, Dolly! on the big screen two years ago, I was astonished at what a fine film it is. It was also totally uncool when released, unlike, say, Easy Rider or Medium Cool. Cool then = dated now.

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I just watched "Possessed" (1947) for about the hundredth time. (SPOILERS AHEAD)

I really like this film. Especially near the ending when Joan Crawford shoots Van Heflin. He has been such a contemptible cad throughout that my biggest point of anxiety was after she shot the first bullet. I was rooting for her to empty the gun into him and she did not disappoint.

It's one of those post WWII films where mental illness is starting to be analyzed scientifically, but there is plenty of melodrama in it too. Joan and Van Heflin have an affair and Joan falls for Heflin's character. Him - not so much. He breaks up with her and says she is smothering him. and that he has wanderlust and just wants to roam around for awhile. Now Heflin doesn't owe her love he doesn't feel, but he could at the very least give her space and time to heal. But nope, the next day he goes down to Joan's employer and gets hired for a construction engineer's job. So he is constantly popping in and out of her life, making fun of her pain, showing up uninvited at her wedding when she marries her rich boss, and ultimately woos and gets engaged to Joan's new twenty year old stepdaughter.  So the man she has always loved will be her son-in-law??? Of course she goes crazy. 

Raymond Massey is good as  at first the rich boss and then husband of Joan who realizes she doesn't love him but is OK with that.  

Joan made a film for MGM in 1931 also called Possessed, but it has nothing at all in common with this film. 

 

 

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15 hours ago, Swithin said:

In one of his negative reviews (he seems to have written two) of Ryan's Daughter, New York Times critic Vincent Canby opened with:

"IF it's true, as one reviewer has written, that every frame of David Lean's new film, "Ryan's Daughter," is "a work of pure and undiluted genius," there are, according to my calculations, approximately 276,480 works of pure and undiluted genius in the 192-minute movie, which should put "Ryan's Daughter" on a par with such other repositories as the Louvre, the Metropolitan Museum and the Hermitage."

https://www.nytimes.com/1970/11/22/archives/thoroughly-romantic-rosythoroughly-romantic-rosy.html

So who is the reviewer whom Canby is referring to? Possibly the Daily News critic?

Reading that review almost put me to sleep. Reminded me how much I don't miss Vincent Canby. Half the review isn't even about the movie. It could have been the Daily News. They picked it as Best Picture of the Year (Wanda Hale) They used the quote in their ads.

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12 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Reading that review almost put me to sleep. Reminded me how much I don't miss Vincent Canby. Half the review isn't even about the movie. It could have been the Daily News. They picked it as Best Picture of the Year (Wanda Hale) They used the quote in their ads.

I think maybe that was considered an article rather than a review.  His actual review (see link) appeared a few days earlier. Don't know why he felt compelled to write about it twice. 

https://www.nytimes.com/1970/11/10/archives/sarah-miles-stars-in-leans-ryans-daughter.html

The Daily News was very popular in those days. It was conservative, just as the Post was liberal. Roles have changed! I think the News (which had the largest circulation in the country), was favoured by, among others, the large New York Irish-American community. I wonder if that had anything to do with the paper's love for Ryan's Daughter.

 

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23 minutes ago, Swithin said:

You would prefer, maybe, some Janet Maslin? 

She was easier to take. I don't even know who writes NYT movie reviews anymore......

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57 minutes ago, Hibi said:

She was easier to take. I don't even know who writes NYT movie reviews anymore......

I got so fed up with film criticism in the 1990s that I pretty much quit reading. also i don't watch too many modern films these days.

...there's also the fact that film and TV are becoming one medium, whether we all like it or not., so what even IS film criticism any more?

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11 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I got so fed up with film criticism in the 1990s that I pretty much quit reading. also i don't watch too many modern films these days.

...there's also the fact that film and TV are becoming one medium, whether we all like it or not., so what even IS film criticism any more?

LOL. True. I prefer to see something sans reviews anyway as they often give a way too much of the plot. With the internet, print film reviews have less importance nowadays....Everyone with a laptop can be a critic!

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18 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

(Darling Lili)

Oh God, do I HAVE to?

It's...bad.   Not "MST3K-fanboy" bad, but more the kind of overproduced long-long-haul that also made "Star!" part of the late-60's Decline of Julie.  

Blake Edwards was taking so much guff from fed-up 60's Sound of Music haters joking about about "G-rated" Julie Andrews from Mary Poppins, he spent most of his career putting his wife into "off-type" roles, like the idea that sweet miss Julie would play a nasty-wasty WWI spy.  Unfortunately, it IS against type, and hard to work up any sympathy for her, even if the script says she has to turn "good" by the last reel.  Also, the fact that it wasn't a musical for its big budget and promotion had to be fixed in its recut, so we get arbitrary music numbers thrown in--Including one desperately Maria-wannabe number where Rock & Julie walk with a happy outing of schoolchildren singing, untranslated, in French, and who walk out of the picture, never to be seen again...Huh.   🤔

(And then Blake had to go and parody that in "S.O.B.", so he could do ANOTHER joke about Mrs. Edwards playing against sweet G-rated type...)

LOL. True. I prefer to see something sans reviews anyway as they often give a way too much of the plot. With the internet, print film reviews have less importance nowadays....Everyone with a laptop can be a critic!

Ever since Roger Ebert died, and we lost the populist voice of mainstream-journalism critics, RottenTomatoes consenses have had to substitute.

Yes, half the review sources seem to be "Everyone with a laptop and a blog", but when a much-hyped movie opens, and the Twitter chat says "33% and dropping rapidly!", that says more volumes about the movie's real-world ability to over or underwhelm an audience than a dozen paragraphs could.

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