Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

Hotel Artemis (2018)

 

LA privatized the water supply and the corporation controlling it shut off all water to the citizens. This causes a riot and the private police force is authorized to use deadly force to quell it. This movie is not about that.

A gang of criminals tries to rob a bank during the riot but things go amiss and three of them are wounded. Hotel Artemis is an illicit trauma center catering to criminals with bullet wounds and similar injuries. The three reach it but only two are admitted because there is a rule against taking in any person who is not a member.  There are rules also against weapons, disrespect of staff and killing other patients. It is not a good night for the rules.

Jodie Foster is excellent as the old, tired and conflicted nurse who runs the establishment. 

Most of the remainder of the cast has been in movies within the Marvel Cinematic Universe. They all acquit themselves very well and are very believable in their roles.

Jeff Goldblum is in a very few scenes. I am sorry to say that he left his character quite one-dimensional. There was one line which he could have made brilliant but he phoned it in.

The movie paints a grand picture of dystopian LA with superb scenery and cinematography.

It is unfortunate that the movie as a whole simply does not work. The writing is innovative within scenes but it is as if there is no grand scheme. I am sure that it looked wonderful on paper but it was very much a set of: "if this is the situation then that has to happen and be immediately followed by this other stock thing."

5/11.4

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I just concluded my 12th watch of Bogdanovich's "Noises Off" (1992)... I have no words to defend my actions, other than this movie cheers me up and is a good distraction. 
Noises Off (1992) - About the Movie | Amblin

Plus, what a cast: Michael Caine, Carol Burnett, Julie Hagerty, Christopher Reeve, Marilu Henner, John Ritter, Nicollete Sheridan... 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

I just concluded my 12th watch of Bogdanovich's "Noises Off" (1992)... I have no words to defend my actions, other than this movie cheers me up and is a good distraction.

I'd seen the play at our local semi-pro group, back when it was still a fresh-off-Broadway thing, years before the movie came out.

...Act II MUST be seen live.    😂

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just saw a new documentary on HBO last night about Tina Turner. It's only titled Tina, and its extremely well-made. Tragic, heartbreaking, ultimately very touching, invigorating, and uplifting. It makes you love her even more. It is also as she states toward the end, her retirement note. It seems that (unless she pops up for inductment at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame) she just wants to bow out now and live the rest of her life quietly.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Chapman Report (1962).

Hollywood tried to make a serious movie about sex while the Production Code was still in effect.  It's an impossible task, an needless to say, they failed badly.  Four women (Jane Fonda, Shelley Winters, Glynis Johns, and Claire Bloom) all respond to a couple of sexologists doing a scientific study of women's sexuality.  This is the hook to explore the various characters' sex lives.

Glynis Johns comes off best, since she gets the comic relief portion of the movie, as a wife who thinks spicing up her sex life with football player Ty Hardin will make things more interesting to the researchers.  Winters does reasonably well in a standard-issue "trapped in a loveless marriage" plotline, while Fonda and Bloom belonged in an over-the-top melodrama like The Best of Everything.

It doesn't work, and it didn't help that the TCM print looked to me as though it had been panned-and-scanned from Cinemascope.  In fact, IMDb says it was originally filmed with a 1.66:1 aspect ratio, not Cinemascope, but it looked grainy with the colors being a bit washed out.

4/10.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Fedya, I've never been able to get through THE CHAPMAN REPORT & thought it was me. 

I did however, borrow CALL NORTHSIDE 777 '48 from my library after reading the comments about it in this thread. I won't re-review it, it was great fun. I really rely on this thread to point me towards unfamiliar titles.

I was happy the movie started out with "This is based on a true story & filmed on location whenever possible" because I would have never believed it, too unrealistic! I absolutely loved the footage in the "round pen" penitentiary and Chicago neighborhoods.

I find it amazing I can watch an entire movie starring James Stewart and follow the story believing him. You know every second it's Stewart, but you still believe he's experiencing all you're seeing happen in the movie. It's a weird concept.  Richard Conté was the other star and I couldn't help thinking he looked like a second rate Garfield.

But the unintentionally funniest part of the movie is all the SMOKING. The Dr doesn't even remove his gloves before lighting up in the examining room! The saddest part (for me) was seeing the newspaper office & running of the presses. There was even a scene showing lead type being set. A world long gone.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The one big problem with Call Northside 777 is that there's no way you could enlarge the photo that much and still have it be clear as day.

I really like the cycle of Fox docudramas from the late 1940s.  The House on 92nd Street is fun, but Boomerang! is probably the best.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Thrill of It All Poster

The Thrill Of It All (1963) TCM-7/10

A doctor's wife becomes a TV spokeswoman which disrupts her household.

The first time I have seen this all the way through, it was a funny 1960s domestic comedy with some satire on TV. Doris Day is as funny as ever with her shocked expressions and line delivery. She has great chemistry with James Garner, who turns in one of his best comedic performances. He is probably Day's best leading man right after Rock Hudson. Carl Reiner co wrote this and has some amusing cameos as a TV actor. There are several old pro characters in this. Edward Andrews and Arlene Francis play an older couple expecting a baby. Zasu Pitts plays a live in maid and  has one of the funniest scenes when she finds Garner in her room at night. Reginald Owen is a an irascible soap company tycoon, 25 years after he played Scrooge in A Christmas Carol. 

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

I began to watch Calling Philo Vance (1940) when it was on TCM the other day, then realized it was a remake of The Kennel Murder Case (1933), so switched it off. 

Instead, I watched The Dragon Murder Case (1934), which I think I have seen before, but which is great fun. A mansion filled with people, most of whom don't like each other; a pool party where three men dive in, only two come out (of a very strange pool!)  The film features as nutty and enjoyable a cast as you'd expect to find in a Philo Vance movie. Warren William excels as Vance, but the two most delightful characters are Eugene Pallette as Sgt. Heath, the bumbling inspector; and Etienne Girardot as Dr. Doremus,  the exasperated coroner, who is always getting called away from his meals. The interplay between Heath and Doremus is hilarious. Pallette played Sgt. Heath in six movies; Girardot played Doremus in three films. Kudos also to Helen Lowell, as a mad old lady.

Lyle Talbot is a major supporting character; mysterious at first, benevolent in fact. An odd thing: someone says to him, nastily, "That's just what I would expect from someone of your race." That's referred to once more, but there's no mention, as far as I could tell, of what his race is supposed to be.

Two exchanges between Girardot (Doremus) and Pallette (Heath):

Dr. Doremus: Ernest, it's clear that you don't know much about women. Now I'll tell you, women are, generally speaking...

Sergeant Ernest Heath: You certainly said it! They ARE generally speaking!

****************

Dr. Doremus: [Leaving the scene, thoroughly annoyed that the body was not dead] Now I'm going to get some breakfast... 

[turning for one last word]

Dr. Doremus: ... and, Heath, don't you call me out here again unless you've got a corpse. I'm here as a coroner, not as a doctor! 

Sergeant Ernest Heath: [shouting after him sarcastically] Why don't you learn to carry a hard-boiled egg in your pocket?

MV5BMWExYjFmNzMtN2NiYi00NjlmLTg0ODAtODUy

020-pallette-william-giradot.jpg?resize=

Eugene Pallette, Warren William, Etienne Girardot

f2193501f81109f468aea6952953de54.jpg

Helen Lowell, Lyle Talbot, Warren William

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Swithin said:

Instead, I watched The Dragon Murder Case (1934), which I think I have seen before, but which is great fun.

Helen Lowell, Lyle Talbot, Warren William

I love this movie very much! Helen Lowell is a real treasure.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Naked Archaeologist (2005–2008)

 

This is a quite wonderful and engrossing series! I have no particularly deep interest in archaeology but I found this quite fascinating. It is hosted by Simcha Jacobovici who has won more than twenty awards for his documentaries. This is his investigation into Biblical archaeology. It covers a wide range from the clothes worn at the time to locating Mt. Sinai to why there is a huge slab of ancient glass in the middle of a Holy cemetery. It explores also the many ways that archaeology provides evidence to support stories in the Bible and how the Bible has led to many important archaeological discoveries.

The information is serious but he presents it in an often whimsical way. Of particular interest to me is how he incorporates micro-clips of old movies into his narrative. These are not just scenes from Biblical epics. His speaking of the gold and silver looted from King Solomon's Temple is backdropped by pirates finding treasure. Cartoons, 1930s musicals and madcap comedies are all fodder for his mill. I believe he used this to prevent the soul-deadening travelogue-and-talking-heads format of many documentaries.

That his method of presentation does not detract from the integrity of the research is evidenced by one episode of this series winning the Special Jury Prize at the 8th International Archaeological Film Festival.

8/9.4

It is available with no additional fees on Amazon Prime Video and with advertisements on TubiTv and is listed as being available on several other streaming services. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I just watched THE END OF THE AFFAIR '99 based on comments in this thread. The movie was based on a story by Graham Greene and starred Ralph Fiennes, Julianne Moore & Stephen Rea.

qfIvAhZj9nMbQ2F4OAdiiPjr26K.jpg

I knew it would show lots of sex (title) so was prepared with thumb on the remote ff button. At first, the story was an eye roller-Ok so Julianne Moore's charactor is married to boring Stephen Rea, meets Ralphie and is swept off her feet. The husband suspects, and Fiennes as a "friend" hires an investigator to uncover the details. Yawn.

But then in a dramatic turn, the Fiennes charactor is killed & his lover prays to God (or the Devil?) to spare him, her love for him is so great. Then it kind of goes along the same lines as the classic "Monkey Paw" story. Intriguing rest of the story but of course,  can't reveal more without ruining it. There are a few "repeated scenes" to show different character's POV of the same incident, but will say I completely saw through them & knew what was going on from the beginning.

Personally, I'm a big fan of "fantasy/miracle" stories like this, especially those involving religion and this movie certainly delivered...glad I stuck with it. The Private Investigator was a great side plot and felt the actor brought a lot to the role & story. I've never seen Ralph Fiennes before and couldn't help being reminded of Paul Henreid.

I love Julianne Moore, she never looked better in this. So talented, she managed a British accent the entire movie flawlessly. The 1940 era costuming was MAGNIFICENT.  She wore only crimson, coral, deep sage & forest greens in a sea of male browns. The lighting, photography & Technicolor added much to the story. And the whole time she reminded me of Mary Astor!

The poor rebuffed husband was sympathetically played by Stephen Rea, another unknown to me. He handled this difficult role deftly I was actually more empathetic & drawn to him than Fiennes! His face kept reminded me of a classic voice actor, maybe Paul Frees? Weird that each actor reminded me of someone else..

End_of_the_affair.jpg

Picking up this image on Wiki, I see this is a remake-have to watch that one now!

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I just watched THE END OF THE AFFAIR '99 based on comments in this thread. The movie was based on a story by Graham Greene and starred Ralph Fiennes, Julianne Moore & Stephen Rea.

qfIvAhZj9nMbQ2F4OAdiiPjr26K.jpg

I knew it would show lots of sex (title) so was prepared with thumb on the remote ff button. At first, the story was an eye roller-Ok so Julianne Moore's charactor is married to boring Stephen Rea, meets Ralphie and is swept off her feet. The husband suspects, and Fiennes as a "friend" hires an investigator to uncover the details. Yawn.

But then in a dramatic turn, the Fiennes charactor is killed & his lover prays to God (or the Devil?) to spare him, her love for him is so great. Then it kind of goes along the same lines as the classic "Monkey Paw" story. Intriguing rest of the story but of course,  can't reveal more without ruining it. There are a few "repeated scenes" to show different character's POV of the same incident, but will say I completely saw through them & knew what was going on from the beginning.

Personally, I'm a big fan of "fantasy/miracle" stories like this, especially those involving religion and this movie certainly delivered...glad I stuck with it. The Private Investigator was a great side plot and felt the actor brought a lot to the role & story. I've never seen Ralph Fiennes before and couldn't help being reminded of Paul Henreid.

I love Julianne Moore, she never looked better in this. So talented, she managed a British accent the entire movie flawlessly. The 1940 era costuming was MAGNIFICENT.  She wore only crimson, coral, deep sage & forest greens in a sea of male browns. The lighting, photography & Technicolor added much to the story. And the whole time she reminded me of Mary Astor!

The poor rebuffed husband was sympathetically played by Stephen Rea, another unknown to me. He handled this difficult role deftly I was actually more empathetic & drawn to him than Fiennes! His face kept reminded me of a classic voice actor, maybe Paul Frees? Weird that each actor reminded me of someone else..

End_of_the_affair.jpg

Picking up this image on Wiki, I see this is a remake-have to watch that one now!

This is also supposed to air in the late night hours on TCM next week. Even though I found the sex scenes to be way too explicit for the rest of the story, this is easily one of the best films of 1999 (#3 out of 59 that year for me). It's beautifully handled on every level, and I think it teaches a good moral lesson in the end. In its native England it was up for many awards, but here in America, award bodies went for lesser films like American Beauty to fill out the nominations list, leaving this one with only two Oscar nominations. And Julianne Moore deserved to win the Oscar that year.

I have seen the earlier version with Deborah Kerr, Van Johnson, and John Mills. Its  very good, and it clears up one moral muddle included in this version toward the end, but it also doesn't include one other closing element seen here that I found extremely moving.

Regarding Ralph Fiennes, I think he is one of the better actors at work today, and I urge you to check out Quiz Show from 1994, about the rigging scandal surrounding the game show Twenty-One in the late 50s. Fiennes played one of the cheating contestants who was in moral agony over his actions, and it was a great performance. The film also had rich performances from John Turturro and Paul Scofield, and had a probing script, plus fine direction by Robert Redford. I think it was the best film of its year.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Butcher's Wife (1991) -- 6.75/10

mqdefault.jpg

Source: HBO

There is no way around the fact that I was born in the 90s and that I have a bit of a soft spot for films that were released in the years leading up to when I was born, maybe in part to understand the world I was born into. It also helps matters that the early 90s were really in retrospect, one of the last gasps for a major studio system to exist mainly on mid-budget films, allowed to be more personal and involving  than big blockbusters. Every now and then though I see one that doesn't pan out, and such is the case with The Butcher's Wife, which at times comes close to working, but in the end does not quite make it.

First of all, one should know that this particular film stars Demi Moore as a blonde psychic/agony aunt/matchmaker from South Carolina who impulsive marries a portly butcher (George Dzundza) from New York because of a dream she had. Upon finding herself in New York, she provides love tips in Greenwich Village to straights and lesbians alike, in addition to helping others in big ways. But somewhere along the line (still only a few days after her sudden marriage), she feels she has miscalculated badly in her love predictions as she finds herself drawn to a psychiatrist (Jeff Daniels) who is often infuriated by her, and her husband, also falling out of love quickly, has fallen for a mousy woman turned bar singer, per Demi's career advice (Mary Steenburgen). Add to all this romantic confusion one more man after Demi (Max Perlich) and that one of the two lesbians (Margaret Colin, the other one being played by Frances McDormand) was at the beginning of the film Jeff Daniels' girlfriend, and you have a second half where it is hard to follow all the confusion this film is throwing at us about  changing relationships within a week.

Moore has a bizarre accent that never feels authentic (Lorna here would rip it to shreds) and she looks washed out. Yet she makes some elements of the role work somehow. of the rest of the cast, Steenburgen comes off best. She seems the most attuned to the quirky mood of the film, and she is often inspired in her delivery of scenes. And she sings extremely well. The rest are all capable enough, even if some of them (like Perlich and McDormand) really do not have much to play at all.

And yet, in its first half, and even at some points after that, there is something sweetly enchanting going on here. it does capture the feeling of a close knit community, and does so with a warm, sweet heart. it has a lilting musical score, warm cinematography, and a personal feel to it. It is sometimes quite funny,  it has a fairy tale for adults feeling, plus its cute. But its ultimately a case of a noble attempt to do something different that almost but not quite gets there. Maybe with a real southerner in the lead like Holly Hunter and a more focused second half, this could have been a romantic comedy gem. 

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched Inside Daisy Clover. I'd seen the last half hour a couple of times, including the one great scene in the film, Natalie Wood in the sound booth. The film doesn't quite work, but I'm glad I saw it. Natalie Wood is too old to play a 16-year-old, yet, especially for a very feminine actress, she successfully gives Daisy a tomboyish, gamine quality. Ruth Gordon, Oscar-nominated as her mother, does her usual Ruth Gordon shtick, energetic and entertaining. Critics who had seen Ruth Gordon on stage in her earlier years said that she already had the mannerisms we're familiar with from her 60s films, but also tried to  be sexy.

Christopher Plummer seems to be channeling Laurence Harvey as the evil studio head Raymond Swan. In 1965 they might well have offered the role to Harvey first. Katharine Bard, an actress previously unknown to me, does well as Plummer's wife, Melora Swan--one of the greatest names I've ever heard. Edith Head did the gowns for Natalie Wood, and the cinematography is attractive. Andre Previn provides a fine score, although Daisy's theme song, "You're Gonna Hear From Me," lyrics by Dory Previn, is Streisand-ish 1960s rather than 1930s, the supposed time of the movie.

Inside Daisy Clover is worth seeing for me simply because we get to see the pre-stardom Robert Redford. It's interesting to see actors before their screen persona is fixed: I'm thinking of Cary Grant in Sylvia Scarlett, Robert Mitchum in The Locket, Kirk Douglas in Mourning Becomes Electra (nice guy) and The Strange Love of Martha Ivers (weakling), Bette Davis in her pre-Of Human Bondage films. After Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Redford would never have dared play a narcissistic bisexual movie star.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, kingrat said:

we get to see the pre-stardom Robert Redford.

 

Go seek out "Twilight Zone" episode "Nothing in the Dark"

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Anina (2013)

2QqS0em.jpg

 

This is a quite lovely and quite quirky little movie. It is in some ways a children's movie and in some ways it is not. Uruguay is not usually the first country to come to mind when thinking of animation and this is a mixed bag of somewhat-minimalist pretty drawings with some clunky movements. That is easily forgiven as you become interested in the story. It does convey well the surrealism of her dreams and fantasies. 

It is the story of Anina Yatay Salas who very much hates her name because it is three times a palindrome and her classmates constantly make fun of it. Her emotions erupt one day on the playground and she fights a girl whom she does not like. They are both given black envelopes which they are to hold for a week before they learn of their punishment. Breaking the seal of the envelope will result in more dire punishment.

I came to this movie after reading an article concerning how true-to-life it is to Uruguayan culture. I do not know how much I might have enjoyed it if I had believed that it had all sprung from a screenwriter's mind.

I watched it on: Amazon Prime Video but it is listed also as being available on: TubiTV. I can find it only in: Spanish with English subtitles which means paying more attention to it than I commonly do these days but it is only eighty minutes and well worth the time.

7.2/9

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, kingrat said:

 After Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Redford would never have dared play a narcissistic bisexual movie star.

BECAUSE HE WAS TOO BUSY LIVING IT, DARLING!

(I kid...but it's entirely possible that I'm not too far off.)

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Vidor said:

 

Go seek out "Twilight Zone" episode "Nothing in the Dark"

Thanks. I don't know if it's available, but I first saw Robert Redford on an episode of Bus Stop (short-lived series) where he and Barbara Baxley played a couple who kidnap the baby of an Irish Sweepstakes winner.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

BECAUSE HE WAS TOO BUSY LIVING IT, DARLING!

(I kid...but it's entirely possible that I'm not too far off.)

Now, Lorna, I wasn't going to say that--but the thought did cross my mind! Redford's screen persona often resembles the handsome guy in the gay bar who never approaches anyone, waits for someone up to his standards to approach him, and is never seen by others to be rejected. Of course Streisand is the aggressor in The Way We Were; that doesn't just fit her persona, it fits Redford's as well. Redford may be the most passive of Hollywood's leading men; he just lets them come to him.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Now, Lorna, I wasn't going to say that--but the thought did cross my mind! Redford's screen persona often resembles the handsome guy in the gay bar who never approaches anyone, waits for someone up to his standards to approach him, and is never seen by others to be rejected. Of course Streisand is the aggressor in The Way We Were; that doesn't just fit her persona, it fits Redford's as well. Redford may be the most passive of Hollywood's leading men; he just lets them come to him.

I am blanking on the title right now, but I was reading PAULINE KAEL and she reviewed an early 1970s REDFORD film (about auto racing?) where he wears no shirt and there are numerous shots of him handling his crotch.

She thought the movie was terrible.

and for BOTH of those reasons, I have wanted to see it very verymuch...surprised I can't recall the title though...

 

edit: it's LITTLE FAUSS AND BIG HALSY, and with a title that dumb, I can see why I did not recall it.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065989/?ref_=nm_flmg_act_47

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was on a Robert Redford kick for awhile last year and watched Downhill Racer (which I loved), The Candidate (which I also loved), All the President's Men (which I also loved), then The Way We Were (which I did NOT love).  I wanted to watch Three Days of the Condor, but haven't gotten to it yet.  Normally, I'm not particularly into blonde men (I just don't find them attractive), but I made the exception for Redford.  I don't know what sets him apart from say, Paul Newman, but I'm Team Redford any day of the week. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I was on a Robert Redford kick for awhile last year and watched Downhill Racer (which I loved), The Candidate (which I also loved), All the President's Men (which I also loved), then The Way We Were (which I did NOT love).  I wanted to watch Three Days of the Condor, but haven't gotten to it yet.  Normally, I'm not particularly into blonde men (I just don't find them attractive), but I made the exception for Redford.  I don't know what sets him apart from say, Paul Newman, but I'm Team Redford any day of the week. 

the uncommon blonde men with Greek-levels of chest hair combo is a rarity, and as such it is DEADLY EFFECTIVE on a  universal level.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

they look just like PENGUINS IN THE ZOO don't they?

Agnes-of-God-19852015-11-07-00-53-07.jpg

I watched AGNES OF GOD (1985) on TCM (is it OSCAR MONTH?)

I have never seen it before and I have to be honest with you, I actually thought it was pretty lousy- in fact, I was genuinely taken aback by how clumsy the first half of the movie is; it gets somewhat interesting at the end, but notsomuch that it can make-up for what is OBVIOUSLY a STAGE PLAY (and a STAGEY STAGE PLAY at that ) presented as un-cinematically as is humanly possible.

it is allegedly a film about mystery and spirituality and there is absolutely no aura of either about it. It is a film without style.  It is straightforward, HALLMARK HALL-OF-FAME level set-ups, and some in-exscuseably  washed-out cinematography, badly framed, and what dialogue and scenarios that are not ham-fisted exposition are  straight out of a 1950's melodrama that somehow snuck past the HAYES CODE.

In all honesty, I was taken aback by how bad it was.

the acting was fine- although I gotta say, as much as I adore ANNE BANCROFT, she's not given enough to do to warrant the BEST ACTRESS NOMINATION she got for it and especially not in a year as killer for lead performances by an actress as 1985 was.

interestingly, she lost to GERALDINE PAGE (for TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL); GERLADINE PAGE had played the part of MOTHER SUPERIOR in AGNES on stage but was passed over for BANCROFT.

 

edit- actually, there is one effective sequence where a Novitiate(?) takes on the vows, but the rest was very uninspired.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...