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So, anyone here besides me catch part-1 of Ken Burns' Ernest Hemingway doc last night on PBS?

It held my attention and interest pretty darn well, anyway.

(...and even though it never featured some kid flying off into the air on his bicycle and silhouetted against a full moon!)  LOL

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32 minutes ago, Dargo said:

(...oh, and I remember noticing that Speilberg loved to make almost every adult character in it either clueless or cruel, and which only further enforced my thought that he had really made it primarily for kids)

I've learned to appreciate Melissa Mathison's paeans to  childhood ("The Black Stallion" was ahead of its time, and "The Indian in the Cupboard" is criminally overlooked), but I also found Spielberg a little mixed-message when it came to the Evil Adult Scientists.

It was a popular 80's vibe, with us hating the Government and all, to have Evil Government Scientists, but why do we get that scene of Peter "Evil Keys" Coyote confessing that he'd always wanted to find an alien--Which would have been nice if Coyote turns and helps them in the end, but instead makes Elliott look like an ageist jerk for still considering him Adult Bad?  Or the scene of one of the scientists saying "He's got DNA!", which would be a major finding, if it wasn't pitched to kids who don't know what that is, and think E.T. is being vivisected for it.

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21 minutes ago, Dargo said:

So, anyone here besides me catch part-1 of Ken Burns' Ernest Hemingway doc last night on PBS?

It held my attention and interest pretty darn well, anyway.

(...and even though it never featured some kid flying off into the air on his bicycle and silhouetted against a full moon!)  LOL

I watched some of it. It was on after Jeopardy last night It was mentioned in a question last night on Jeopardy and then the bio showed up right after on PBS! Unfortunately I got a phone call so watching was interrupted, I will watch it when it's on again.

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Hemingway's mother was quite a piece of work. I left off when his mom would dress the twins first as boys then as girls! btw, I got the Hemingway questions right last night, I'm sure you did too,. Oh, Jeopardy is on now.

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1 hour ago, Dargo said:

So, anyone here besides me catch part-1 of Ken Burns' Ernest Hemingway doc last night on PBS?

It held my attention and interest pretty darn well, anyway.

(...and even though it never featured some kid flying off into the air on his bicycle and silhouetted against a full moon!)  LOL

Yes I did...it was great!  Part 2 is coming up shortly.

 

18 minutes ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Hemingway's mother was quite a piece of work. I left off when his mom would dress the twins first as boys then as girls! btw, I got the Hemingway questions right last night, I'm sure you did too,. Oh, Jeopardy is on now.

They weren't twins...Ma just decided to dress him and one of his sisters identically as she saw fit; sometimes as boys, sometimes as girls...even though they were 2 years (I think) apart in age!  And you're right, his mother was something else.  So was his dad, which I attribute to being too 'over the top' on their religious beliefs.

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Yes, and she was so resentful about giving up her singing career to raise the children. Talk about a guilt trip to give the kids. Thanks for the correction, she dressed them as twins. Best not to be on the phone while watching a documentary.

watching part 2,hopefully without interruption

 

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11 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I was born in 1978, and I think I saw ET: THE EXTRA TERRESTRIAL sometime on a re-release ca. 1984 (before VHS blew up.)

I still have a STRONG MEMORY of how much I DESPISED IT, like white-hot-LOATHING from the pit of my stomach, as all the other children were getting misty and holding on to their mother's hands I was like:

 

I don't like ET either.  I never have.  I've seen it exactly once and once was enough. 

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I didn't realize the Hemingway documentary had started already. Saw the second part tonight. Guy

was something of an awhole. I wonder if part one mentioned Hemingway's up close and personal

critique of F. Scott Fitzgerald's wee wee. 

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15 hours ago, EricJ said:

Those of us who've seen Richard Attenborough's directing career CONTINUE to moan about Gandhi beating E.T., regardless of how one might feel about the latter.

One might consider Missing or Tootsie or even The Verdict, or perhaps various unnominated films, to be superior to both Gandhi and E.T.

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4 hours ago, Vidor said:

 

But you made incorrect statements above, and I thought I'd point that out.

 

My statements were far from inaccurate.

I stated at all times that I must have missed things and/or I did not know things.

I have now rewatched the critical scenes. I found only minor lines of dialogue and one poor shot to establish any change in his health. This is far from overt and so it is reasonable that an average viewer would miss them. Any analysis of the scene against realistic expectations of the course of deterioration due to toxic environment clearly indicates that the movie is taking great liberties and inserting a situation for which no basis has been laid. It parallels the poor screenwriting evident in mystery stories when the perpetrator has no screen time nor is ever mentioned prior to the penultimate scene. 

Love it if you will. I expect much more of my movie-watching time and vapid explanations of why a movie is great do not sway me. 

 

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5 hours ago, Dargo said:

Maybe in my case it was the fact that when E.T. first hit the screens I was already 30, and so of an age when an earnestly told little fairy tale like this Spielberg movie would appeal to me less than if I were half that age at the time.

 

I was not far past that age when I was first exposed to it. Our party was myself and two other women of similar age and my step-daughter and five of her friends. The girls were early teens. None of us were in any manner captivated by the movie prior to the girls realizing that they outnumbered us two-to-one and sought to take advantage of the fact that they could leap with ease from row to row while we had to climb over seats. I am happy to say that it was a time when age and guile won over youth and ability! A part of our victory was that our water pistols were larger than what the girls had and were of the variety that chips of ice could be placed in the reservoirs to make a shot to the back of the neck or down the front of a blouse particularly effective.

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9 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I didn't realize the Hemingway documentary had started already. Saw the second part tonight. Guy

was something of an awhole. I wonder if part one mentioned Hemingway's up close and personal

critique of F. Scott Fitzgerald's wee wee. 

No Vautrin, no mention of Fitzgerald's nether regions!  Part 3 wraps up the series tonight.  What's sad is that suicide seems to be embedded in the family's DNA.  Of the 8 people in Hemingway's initial family (Mom, Dad, 6 siblings), half of them killed themselves.  Sad and shocking at the same time.  As usual, I love the style of the presentation which is familiar in a Ken Burns collaboration.  The interviews with people who knew him or studied him are most insightful.  I think Ernest Hemingway is the kind of guy a lot of people would gravitate to.  He could be charming, witty, and sardonic; the kind of jock you'd want to have playing on your team, but he also had a flip side to him that was sometimes cruel, cutting, and aloof.  I could see myself wanting to hang around a fellow like that, but I think I'd eventually get to the point where I could only take him in small doses.

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9 hours ago, SansFin said:

My statements were far from inaccurate....

I have now rewatched the critical scenes. I found only minor lines of dialogue and one poor shot to establish any change in his health. This is far from overt and so it is reasonable that an average viewer would miss them....

Love it if you will. 

 

 

Well, your post indicated a failure to pay attention and a failure to understand the plot.  And while I haven't conducted an opinion poll I think everyone else since 1982 has understood that being on Earth made E.T. sick and Elliott got sick along with him.  Hate it if you will!  

 

I have however given it further thought and concluded that since Einstein's theory of relativity tells us that faster-than-light travel is impossible, therefore the plot of "E.T." is not realistic, therefore "Gandhi" actually did deserve to win Best Picture of 1982.

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The Conversation Poster

The Conversation (1974) FLIX On Demand 7/10

A wire tap expert (Gene Hackman) refuses to turn over his tapes on a case he thinks will end in murder.

This was a very good character study masquerading as a mystery/thriller. Hackman gives one of his best and most subtle performances. It was directed by Francis Ford Coppola the same year he did The Godfather Part II. The film is very slow and tried my patience but the twist ending is worth waiting for. I had seen this before but I did forget most of it, including the twist. There is an interesting supporting cast. John Cazale is Hackman's co worker who becomes frustrated by his friend's cold behavior. Frederic Forrest and Cindy Williams are a young couple Hackman is hired to bug. Allen Garfield plays a sleazy rival wire tapper. Harrison Ford has an early role as a menacing assistant to Hackman's mysterious client. And Robert Duvall has a surprising unbilled cameo. 

 

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4 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

The Conversation Poster

The Conversation (1974) FLIX On Demand 7/10

A wire tap expert (Gene Hackman) refuses to turn over his tapes on a case he thinks will end in murder.

This was a very good character study masquerading as a mystery/thriller. Hackman gives one of his best and most subtle performances. It was directed by Francis Ford Coppola the same year he did The Godfather Part II. The film is very slow and tried my patience but the twist ending is worth waiting for. I had seen this before but I did forget most of it, including the twist. There is an interesting supporting cast. John Cazale is Hackman's co worker who becomes frustrated by his friend's cold behavior. Frederic Forrest and Cindy Williams are a young couple Hackman is hired to bug. Allen Garfield plays a sleazy rival wire tapper. Harrison Ford has an early role as a menacing assistant to Hackman's mysterious client. And Robert Duvall has a surprising unbilled cameo. 

 

 

Never heard a better example in the English language of how stress changes the meanings of words.

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16 minutes ago, Vidor said:

 

Never heard a better example in the English language of how stress changes the meanings of words.

I'm guessing you mean the line "He'd kill us if he had the chance"

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Black Bart (1948)

Universal released this western, a fictionalized account of the gentleman bandit who preyed on Wells Fargo stagecoaches in California during the 1870s. The film is distinguished by its strong Technicolor, making this production constantly pleasing to the eye.

Dan Duryea, in a lead role, for a change, plays the title character, in a generally effective if understated performance, lacking the flamboyance of his best work. Top billed Yvonne de Carlo plays Lola Montez, another real life character, here with a fictional romance with Bart whom she wants to retire from the robbery business before he pays the ultimate price one day for his dangerous lifestyle. De Carlo looks sexy and flashy in a couple of Spanish style dance numbers though her character strangely disappears before the end of the film.

Cast in supporting roles are Jeffrey Lynn, of all people, as a larcenous western bad man, along with Pa Kettle himself, Percy Kilbride, as a compatriot. Kilbride, at least, brings a rustic credibility to his characterization that Lynn clearly lacks. The stunt double work in this film is pretty obvious, at times, and every time Black Bart rides a horse in costume, including a mask covering his head, you just know that Duryea was no where near the film set that day.

The ending may seem abrupt and rather conventional but I had to wonder with the flippant bantering dialogue we hear between a pair of bandits as they are finally cornered by the law if William Goldman had seen this film and been inspired by that aspect of it before writing his screenplay two decades later for Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.

The other interesting aspect of this film is watching Duryea and de Carlo sharing romantic scenes a year before they were reunited to far different effect for the same studio's noir classic Criss Cross.

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRAoJoAIiqDJQMDh9zFeVB

2.5 out of 4

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12 hours ago, midwestan said:

No Vautrin, no mention of Fitzgerald's nether regions!  Part 3 wraps up the series tonight.  What's sad is that suicide seems to be embedded in the family's DNA.  Of the 8 people in Hemingway's initial family (Mom, Dad, 6 siblings), half of them killed themselves.  Sad and shocking at the same time.  As usual, I love the style of the presentation which is familiar in a Ken Burns collaboration.  The interviews with people who knew him or studied him are most insightful.  I think Ernest Hemingway is the kind of guy a lot of people would gravitate to.  He could be charming, witty, and sardonic; the kind of jock you'd want to have playing on your team, but he also had a flip side to him that was sometimes cruel, cutting, and aloof.  I could see myself wanting to hang around a fellow like that, but I think I'd eventually get to the point where I could only take him in small doses.

I think a little of Hemingway went a long way, unless one had an interest in fishing, bullfighting, or hunting.

But he was likely a fun drinking companion. Not sure about the sober Hemingway. The story about Hemingway

giving Fitzgerald the once over in a men's room is from Hemingway's posthumously published memoir A Moveable

Feast. I looked in my copy last night but couldn't find it. Might have missed it. The whole episode is pretty funny.

At the conclusion of his "examination," Dr. Hemingway told Fitzgerald he was perfectly fine in the ******* area. 

I'm enjoying the program. It gives a good chronological account of his life, which many folks probably only know

in bits and pieces. 

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9 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

The Conversation Poster

The Conversation (1974) FLIX On Demand 7/10

A wire tap expert (Gene Hackman) refuses to turn over his tapes on a case he thinks will end in murder.

This was a very good character study masquerading as a mystery/thriller. Hackman gives one of his best and most subtle performances. It was directed by Francis Ford Coppola the same year he did The Godfather Part II. The film is very slow and tried my patience but the twist ending is worth waiting for. I had seen this before but I did forget most of it, including the twist. There is an interesting supporting cast. John Cazale is Hackman's co worker who becomes frustrated by his friend's cold behavior. Frederic Forrest and Cindy Williams are a young couple Hackman is hired to bug. Allen Garfield plays a sleazy rival wire tapper. Harrison Ford has an early role as a menacing assistant to Hackman's mysterious client. And Robert Duvall has a surprising unbilled cameo. 

 

Great film. Haven't seen it in awhile.

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15 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I think a little of Hemingway went a long way, unless one had an interest in fishing, bullfighting, or hunting.

But he was likely a fun drinking companion. Not sure about the sober Hemingway. The story about Hemingway

giving Fitzgerald the once over in a men's room is from Hemingway's posthumously published memoir A Moveable

Feast. I looked in my copy last night but couldn't find it. Might have missed it. The whole episode is pretty funny.

At the conclusion of his "examination," Dr. Hemingway told Fitzgerald he was perfectly fine in the ******* area. 

I'm enjoying the program. It gives a good chronological account of his life, which many folks probably only know

in bits and pieces. 

Part 3 to wrap up the documentary "Hemingway" was a real downer!  The poor guy cracked his coconut one too many times in his life that by the end, he had a brain that probably resembled mush.  Being part of his family, whether he was a youngster or in the twilight of his life would have given those with the strongest necks and backs a most severe case of whiplash.  Watching that interview NBC did with him in the mid-50's from Cuba was heart-breaking and painful to watch; far from the hard-drinking, robust, man's man image Hemingway usually conveyed in photos and print interviews.  I think his Nobel Prize for Literature for writing "The Old Man and the Sea" was akin to a 'make up' win for previous slights, as we sometimes see with Academy Award winners.  I read "Old Man..." in high school and was bored to death by it, whereas, "The Sun Also Rises" was a book I couldn't put down.

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6 hours ago, midwestan said:

Watching that interview NBC did with him in the mid-50's from Cuba was heart-breaking and painful to watch;

 

I only caught a few minutes of the show but I think I saw that.  Was that the interview with the reporter where he's talking about writing a book about Africa, only he's enunciating the words slowly and carefully as if he's drunk?  And he actually verbalizes "comma" and "period"?  Yes, that was awful.

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9 hours ago, midwestan said:

Part 3 to wrap up the documentary "Hemingway" was a real downer!  The poor guy cracked his coconut one too many times in his life that by the end, he had a brain that probably resembled mush.  Being part of his family, whether he was a youngster or in the twilight of his life would have given those with the strongest necks and backs a most severe case of whiplash.  Watching that interview NBC did with him in the mid-50's from Cuba was heart-breaking and painful to watch; far from the hard-drinking, robust, man's man image Hemingway usually conveyed in photos and print interviews.  I think his Nobel Prize for Literature for writing "The Old Man and the Sea" was akin to a 'make up' win for previous slights, as we sometimes see with Academy Award winners.  I read "Old Man..." in high school and was bored to death by it, whereas, "The Sun Also Rises" was a book I couldn't put down.

Yes, very depressing. Really felt sorry for the old boy, especially as some of the events were accidents that

he had little control over. I felt sorry for his last wife. He really put her through the wringer. No one deserves

something like that. That interview was sad, and even though he was reading off cue cards, he still seemed

confused. I think the Nobel Prize might have been a make up for earlier novels or else something of a lifetime

achievement award for his work as a whole, though it was given for The Old Man and the Sea. I think I too read it

in high school but don't remember much about it, except that it was rather short and an okay adventure story.

I doubt most high school kids had much of an interest in an old guy and his nothing much left but the bones

marlin. It was interesting that Llosa felt it was a masterpiece and O'Brien dismissed it as adolescent writing

with little to recommend it. Hard not to think of his buddy Fitzgerald's well known quote about there being

no second acts in American lives. I hope PBS repeats it at some time so I can see part one, which I missed.

 

 

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9 hours ago, midwestan said:

Part 3 to wrap up the documentary "Hemingway" was a real downer!  The poor guy cracked his coconut one too many times in his life that by the end, he had a brain that probably resembled mush.  Being part of his family, whether he was a youngster or in the twilight of his life would have given those with the strongest necks and backs a most severe case of whiplash.  Watching that interview NBC did with him in the mid-50's from Cuba was heart-breaking and painful to watch; far from the hard-drinking, robust, man's man image Hemingway usually conveyed in photos and print interviews.  I think his Nobel Prize for Literature for writing "The Old Man and the Sea" was akin to a 'make up' win for previous slights, as we sometimes see with Academy Award winners.  I read "Old Man..." in high school and was bored to death by it, whereas, "The Sun Also Rises" was a book I couldn't put down.

Did the documentary mention Hemingway's rather inept attempts to spy for the Communists?

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The Long Dark Hall 1951 directed by Reginald Beck  & Anthony Bushell. with Rex Harrison Lilli Palmer Anthony Dawson .Screenplay by Nunnally Johnson,.A crime drama developped by Universal for Eddie Robinson then it  was sold to a UK producer.An ok movie but what is quite surprising is the subject : an unfaithful husband is the last person to have seen his murdered mistress.On the heels of Carole Landis's suicide....in 1948.Palmer was married to Rex in real life she also went to the funeral with Harrison.Just before Harrison had made only 1 film Unfaithfully Yours with Preston Sturges and it died at the box office in part because of the scandal. Harrison left Hollywood for a while.I think this one was barely released in America.A movie imitating real life events,Harrison hates the film and my question is why he and Palmer did it then? They obviously knew the screenplay... Anthony Dawson does a great performance as the villain-again- he later played the hired killer in Dial M for Murder,always cast as a villain he was a very good actor, he deserved bigger roles.I do not know if this movie was ever shown on TCM 6.5/10

rex.jpg

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