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THE ANGEL WITH THE TRUMPET 1950 by Anthony Bushell with Eileen Herlie Maria Schell Basil Sydney Oskar Werner Set in 1880's Austria ,this is  the  50 years saga of an Austrian family,interesting film but Basil Sydney is totally miscast,good acting.The uncredited narrator is Jack Hawkins with  his unmistakable voice I do not know if this movie was ever shown on TCM.. 6.5/10

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On 4/6/2021 at 6:57 PM, Dargo said:

So, anyone here besides me catch part-1 of Ken Burns' Ernest Hemingway doc last night on PBS?

It held my attention and interest pretty darn well, anyway.

(...and even though it never featured some kid flying off into the air on his bicycle and silhouetted against a full moon!)  LOL

I started to watch it. Fascinating. Not particularly a fan, but it was interesting. I was watching the Jazz series, but... Well, I can't find a schedule for these shows. They show up on PBS periodically, not really scheduled and I find that I'm watching part two or part six and miss out on a lot. It's infuriating really.  

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On 4/6/2021 at 9:46 PM, speedracer5 said:

I don't like ET either.  I never have.  I've seen it exactly once and once was enough. 

Agreed.

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On 4/7/2021 at 10:31 AM, TomJH said:

Black Bart (1948)

Universal released this western, a fictionalized account of the gentleman bandit who preyed on Wells Fargo stagecoaches in California during the 1870s. The film is distinguished by its strong Technicolor, making this production constantly pleasing to the eye.

Dan Duryea, in a lead role, for a change, plays the title character, in a generally effective if understated performance, lacking the flamboyance of his best work. Top billed Yvonne de Carlo plays Lola Montez, another real life character, here with a fictional romance with Bart whom she wants to retire from the robbery business before he pays the ultimate price one day for his dangerous lifestyle. De Carlo looks sexy and flashy in a couple of Spanish style dance numbers though her character strangely disappears before the end of the film.

Cast in supporting roles are Jeffrey Lynn, of all people, as a larcenous western bad man, along with Pa Kettle himself, Percy Kilbride, as a compatriot. Kilbride, at least, brings a rustic credibility to his characterization that Lynn clearly lacks. The stunt double work in this film is pretty obvious, at times, and every time Black Bart rides a horse in costume, including a mask covering his head, you just know that Duryea was no where near the film set that day.

The ending may seem abrupt and rather conventional but I had to wonder with the flippant bantering dialogue we hear between a pair of bandits as they are finally cornered by the law if William Goldman had seen this film and been inspired by that aspect of it before writing his screenplay two decades later for Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.

The other interesting aspect of this film is watching Duryea and de Carlo sharing romantic scenes a year before they were reunited to far different effect for the same studio's noir classic Criss Cross.

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2.5 out of 4

What a cast!

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5 hours ago, Vidor said:

 

I only caught a few minutes of the show but I think I saw that.  Was that the interview with the reporter where he's talking about writing a book about Africa, only he's enunciating the words slowly and carefully as if he's drunk?  And he actually verbalizes "comma" and "period"?  Yes, that was awful.

Hemingway was said to not like being interviewed.  For this televised show, he wanted to see the questions from the reporter in advance so he could prepare his answers.  He was reading his responses off cue cards that were placed on the floor (apparently).  He was almost catatonic with his speech pattern, as if he were being tortured, then interrogated for the 43rd time.

 

2 hours ago, kingrat said:

Did the documentary mention Hemingway's rather inept attempts to spy for the Communists?

I can't remember the circumstance, but Hemingway was apparently providing information to either British, American, or French intelligence.  He had been contacted by Soviet authorities to do the same for them, and he agreed at first, but never did issue a report to Moscow.

3 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Yes, very depressing. Really felt sorry for the old boy, especially as some of the events were accidents that

he had little control over. I felt sorry for his last wife. He really put her through the wringer. No one deserves

something like that. That interview was sad, and even though he was reading off cue cards, he still seemed

confused. I think the Nobel Prize might have been a make up for earlier novels or else something of a lifetime

achievement award for his work as a whole, though it was given for The Old Man and the Sea. I think I too read it

in high school but don't remember much about it, except that it was rather short and an okay adventure story.

I doubt most high school kids had much of an interest in an old guy and his nothing much left but the bones

marlin. It was interesting that Llosa felt it was a masterpiece and O'Brien dismissed it as adolescent writing

with little to recommend it. Hard not to think of his buddy Fitzgerald's well known quote about there being

no second acts in American lives. I hope PBS repeats it at some time so I can see part one, which I missed.

 

 

You may want to try PBS.org to see if you can stream that episode online.  I was able to do that for an episode of "All Creatures Great and Small", which aired earlier this year on Masterpiece Theatre.

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7 hours ago, kingrat said:

Did the documentary mention Hemingway's rather inept attempts to spy for the Communists?

It mentioned an argument he had in Spain with John Dos Passos about keeping silent on the NKVD executions of those deemed insufficiently communist. Dos Passos' friend and translator José Robles was executed by the Stalinists and he wanted to expose their activities, while Hemingway thought it would be a bad career move that would anger the pro-communist East coast establishment. The film then mentioned when discussing Hemingway's trip to China that he had been asked by Moscow to provide information on the war with the Japanese, but said in the same breath that he gave them none. 

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5 hours ago, midwestan said:

 

You may want to try PBS.org to see if you can stream that episode online.  I was able to do that for an episode of "All Creatures Great and Small", which aired earlier this year on Masterpiece Theatre.

I'll have to look around on the net and see if I can catch the first part somewhere. They'll probably repeat it

sometime in the not too distant future. One of my local PBS stations is re-running Ken Burns' Baseball documentary

too.

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This is a reply to @Janet0312  but I screwed up my quote.  She said, "Well, I can't find a schedule for these shows. They show up on PBS periodically, not really scheduled and I find that I'm watching part two or part six and miss out on a lot. It's infuriating really."

I found out about it by watching Jeopardy! Monday evening, where the documentary was a category with clues read by Ken Burns. A clever way to promote it, I thought. I pulled up the KERA schedule on my tablet and found it listed for a 9 o'clock start. 

PBS streams on Roku, but I don't know if this one is up there yet. 

If not, you can watch it here.

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Blood Alley (1955)

Uninspiring actioner in which John Wayne plays a Yankee sea captain asked to help an entire Chinese village escape from Red China to Hong Kong via a beat up old ferry boat. This was produced by Batjac, Wayne's production company, originally to have Robert Mitchum in the lead. Wayne was forced to fire Mitchum, however, after director William Welllman, who didn't get along with Mitchum, gave the Duke an "either him or me" ultimatum. Novice producer Wayne then cast himself in the lead role. From my perspective, considering the sparsity of intelligent script material here, this proved to be a break for Mitchum.

The Oriental "location" shooting was done off the coast of California for a generally handsome looking production. Lauren Bacall co-stars as a doctor's daughter who is also to take flight on the ferry, with Paul Fix, doing the pidgin English routine, as an elder Chinese spokesperson. Mike Mazurki, cast as an Oriental, is also along for the ride but speaks better English than Fix (which says a lot about Fix).

Wayne's character, initially held in a Communist prison cell, spends time speaking to an invisible woman companion he calls "Baby" to help himself keep sane. Unfortunately he still keeps talking to her even after he gets out. His kind of a woman, though. No back talk. Certainly, though, he has more screen chemistry with "Baby" than he does with Bacall.

The film is as slow as the ferry, its highlight sequence, arguably, set during a storm in which Wayne is attacked by a couple of Communists on board the ship (there are a fair number of "Commie" references made by Wayne throughout the film). Perhaps the dumbest moment in the film occurs after Wayne is piloting the ferry, filled with hundreds of villagers, as the Commies are firing shells at them from a ship. The shells are just barely missing the ferry as they try to make their escape, the lives of all aboard in the balance.

Then, suddenly, Bacall, who had sneaked ashore, comes racing back, trying to catch the ferry. Wayne stops the boat, with explosions raining all around them and puts it in reverse, closer to the line of fire, so the lady can hop aboard. Okay, I know she's Lauren Bacall and she's the leading lady and all that but Wayne's character is endangering the lives of hundreds of people for the sake of one. How would it look if one of the shells had struck killing dozens in the process? Somehow I have the impression that if it had been anyone but Bacall doing this Wayne's attitude would have been, "Tough luck, lady. I'm not endangering the lives of all aboard for some lamebrain who took off."

Wayne fans will probably like the film well enough but for the rest of us it's pretty forgettable. Anita Ekberg has a small dialogue-less part as a Chinese villager. I had difficulty recognizing her. Now that is a crime far greater than anything the Commies do in this film.

587108790874481_mainphotos.jpg

2 out of 4

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

Blood Alley (1955)

This was the John Wayne film being plugged when he guest starred on I Love Lucy. It was the episode when Lucy and Ethel stole Wayne's footprints in cement. At one point Lucy says she heard Wayne's new movie Blood Alley is just wonderful!

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15 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I'll have to look around on the net and see if I can catch the first part somewhere. They'll probably repeat it

sometime in the not too distant future. One of my local PBS stations is re-running Ken Burns' Baseball documentary

too.

If you have On Demand, I checked, all 3 episodes are On Demand ( I have spectrum) but other carriers probably will have it too.

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All the Way Home (1963) -- 10/10  

Source; Amazon Video; $2.99 48-hour rental

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I paid up to see this film because I knew I would never have another shot at it. i know that some complained online that they ended up accidentally with a stage production of this from the 80s with Sally Field and William Hurt, but I ended up  with the version I wanted, and it is simply a great film.  The only little quibble I have was over one particularly nasty racial slur twice in the same scene, but since the word is not condoned by the characters it lessens the sting.  Otherwise, there are only superlatives to be had. This is an achingly poignant study of a certain time and place, and also of grief. This was based on a stage play, which was in turn based of James Agee's autobiographical work A Death in the Family. The title is accurate. Halfway through the film, the husband and father played by Robert Preston passes away suddenly, leaving his wife Jean Simmons and young son bereft. Simmons and Preston play a very different couple, but a loving one, in spite of personal differences, hes the life force, and she is more restrained. In the cases of both of them, they are sublime. Preston is as good as ever in his limited time, and Simmons gets one of the very best performances of her career. It's also the final film for Aline macMahon, as an aging aunt, and she is brilliant here too. It's such a moving film, such a great film, that I feel somewhat cheated that it has flown under the radar for so long. It's well worth the $2.99 to see it, and in my mind is worth a lot more.

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7 hours ago, TomJH said:

Blood Alley (1955)

Uninspiring actioner in which John Wayne plays a Yankee sea captain asked to help an entire Chinese village escape from Red China to Hong Kong via a beat up old ferry boat. This was produced by Batjac, Wayne's production company, originally to have Robert Mitchum in the lead. Wayne was forced to fire Mitchum, however, after director William Welllman, who didn't get along with Mitchum, gave the Duke an "either him or me" ultimatum. Novice producer Wayne then cast himself in the lead role. From my perspective, considering the sparsity of intelligent script material here, this proved to be a break for Mitchum.

The Oriental "location" shooting was done off the coast of California for a generally handsome looking production. Lauren Bacall co-stars as a doctor's daughter who is also to take flight on the ferry, with Paul Fix, doing the pidgin English routine, as an elder Chinese spokesperson. Mike Mazurki, cast as an Oriental, is also along for the ride but speaks better English than Fix (which says a lot about Fix).

Wayne's character, initially held in a Communist prison cell, spends time speaking to an invisible woman companion he calls "Baby" to help himself keep sane. Unfortunately he still keeps talking to her even after he gets out. His kind of a woman, though. No back talk. Certainly, though, he has more screen chemistry with "Baby" than he does with Bacall.

The film is as slow as the ferry, its highlight sequence, arguably, set during a storm in which Wayne is attacked by a couple of Communists on board the ship (there are a fair number of "Commie" references made by Wayne throughout the film). Perhaps the dumbest moment in the film occurs after Wayne is piloting the ferry, filled with hundreds of villagers, as the Commies are firing shells at them from a ship. The shells are just barely missing the ferry as they try to make their escape, the lives of all aboard in the balance.

Then, suddenly, Bacall, who had sneaked ashore, comes racing back, trying to catch the ferry. Wayne stops the boat, with explosions raining all around them and puts it in reverse, closer to the line of fire, so the lady can hop aboard. Okay, I know she's Lauren Bacall and she's the leading lady and all that but Wayne's character is endangering the lives of hundreds of people for the sake of one. How would it look if one of the shells had struck killing dozens in the process? Somehow I have the impression that if it had been anyone but Bacall doing this Wayne's attitude would have been, "Tough luck, lady. I'm not endangering the lives of all aboard for some lamebrain who took off."

Wayne fans will probably like the film well enough but for the rest of us it's pretty forgettable. Anita Ekberg has a small dialogue-less part as a Chinese villager. I had difficulty recognizing her. Now that is a crime far greater than anything the Commies do in this film.

587108790874481_mainphotos.jpg

2 out of 4

As a followup to the Blood Alley review, I should have mentioned in it that an uncredited Victor Sen Yung plays a Commie solider in the film who tries to sexually assault Lauren Bacall. She is saved by all American John Wayne who gives Sen Young the sharp end of a bayonet. This stereotypical type casting is all the more ironic when you consider the fact that during WWII Victor Sen Yung served as a Captain of Intelligence for the U.S. Air Force while Wayne's war service was, well, you know, on the movie screen.

Victor Sen Yung is probably best known to film buffs today as Jimmy Chan, #2 son to Sidney Toler's Charlie Chan in a series of "B"mysteries during the '40s.

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23 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Victor Sen Yung is probably best known to film buffs today as Jimmy Chan, #2 son to Sidney Toler's Charlie Chan in a series of "B"mysteries during the '40s.

A TCM film buff is more likely to know Victor Sen Yung from his fine performances in Warner Bros.  films like The Letter,  Across The Pacific, and The Breaking Point (since TCM doesn't show the Chan films).     I really like this more cunning and dangerous side of Yung verses the rather comical side as #2 son in the Charlie Chan series.

He was also in the recently restored Ann Sheridan noir Women on the Run.  

T.V. buff know him as "Hop Sing," the cook on the long-running television series Bonanza, appearing in 107 episodes between 1959 and 1973.[7

He also was in Kung Fu,   as well as many earlier performances like Get Smart (where he plays a Japanese spy that is great at impersonation,  in the role as a Chinese,, which was  classic Buck Henry of comedy).

   

 

 

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3 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

If you have On Demand, I checked, all 3 episodes are On Demand ( I have spectrum) but other carriers probably will have it too.

Thanks. I don't have On Demand, but I'm sure the Hemingway doc will turn up one of these days.

Guess I should have paid more attention to the schedule.

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27 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

Thanks. I don't have On Demand, but I'm sure the Hemingway doc will turn up one of these days.

Guess I should have paid more attention to the schedule.

YIKES! It's on right now here on an affiliate.,WGBXW
google pbs schedule and it will show you if it's on there tonight. It's part 1 and started at 8pm est.

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1 hour ago, lavenderblue19 said:

YIKES! It's on right now here on an affiliate.,WGBXW
google pbs schedule and it will show you if it's on there tonight. It's part 1 and started at 8pm est.

Since PBS is more of a consortium rather than a network, each member station sets its own schedule (as they have to pay to air the programs).  Commercial networks like NBC, etc. pay their affiliates to carry programs in exchange for running national ads on their local airwaves (the opposite of the PBS model).   The commercial networks set their ad rates based upon a certain number of markets "clearing" or airing their programs and ads, and these are part of the affiliation contracts.

As a result, PBS schedules are somewhat variable from one market to the next, whereas the commercial networks' schedules are pretty much the same wherever you go in the country.  PBS has a preferred schedule, especially for primetime, but each station can opt out of the program, or time shift it.

In the case of Hemingway, most member stations carried it this week Monday to Wednesday, but that's not the case nationwide.  My local station showed each episode twice each evening, back-to-back earlier this week, and is scheduled to rerun it this weekend as well.   

Commercial stations can vary their national carriage schedules as well, but this is rather rare in primetime these days.  Most of the time it's because a station may have multiple affiliations (in smaller TV markets) and they have to pick and choose which programs to air.   Sometimes they will pre-empt for some local program.  In the old days, some stations would not air a program or a particular episode because they objected to the content (Maude's abortion storyline is an example of this).  But by and large, the commercial network schedules are standardized nationwide.

As the old saying goes, "consult your local listings."

 

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5 hours ago, Peebs said:

I was able to watch all three episodes for free on pbs.org.  See link below:

Hemingway | PBS

 

I tried that yesterday and while I got to the episode I wasn't able to play it.

Maybe it's the Curse of Papa.

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5 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

YIKES! It's on right now here on an affiliate.,WGBXW
google pbs schedule and it will show you if it's on there tonight. It's part 1 and started at 8pm est.

I get three different PBS stations and now that I think of it, I believe only two showed Hemingway.

So maybe the third one will show it next week. I'll be looking for it.

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6 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I get three different PBS stations and now that I think of it, I believe only two showed Hemingway.

So maybe the third one will show it next week. I'll be looking for it.

 if you have one of those fancy-schmancy Roku TVs, PBS has a whole station you can download. I did last night so I could watch the first episode: HEMINGWAY AT WAR: CH 1: I’M NOT GAY, I JUST *REALLY* WANT TO RIDE MY BICYCLE DOWN TO THE TRENCHES SO I CAN PASS OUT CANDY TO THE MEN. 

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I also have to add, I am *really* struggling with coming up with any reason why I should think somebody who witnessed firsthand the horrors of war and then went on to make the conscious choice to lie *repeatedly*  and with increasing grandeur about their various experiences during said war, Is anything other than a piece of dog ****.

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Oh great. Now they’re trotting out Mario Vargas Llosa to romanticize about the beauty of torturing animals aka bull”fighting.”

Of course to be fair, for those of us who’ve read anything by him, we know what an expert in torture Llosa is.

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I’m sorry, I’ve had a really terrible week and I’m extra salty lately. It just gets my goat how- In any discussion of “great literature” the works that are The easiest to digest and dissect, with paint by numbers symbolism, flat lifeless prose, and motifs with which the author chooses to slap the reader in the face repeatedly like a cold fish are ALWAYS LABELLED SUPERLATIVELY AS THE ****GREATEST OF ALL TIME*** AND IF YOU DONT SEE THAT, WELL THEN, LET ME PAT YOU ON THE HEAD,  HAND YOU A HARD CANDY TO SUCK ON AND SEND YOU ALONG YOUR SIMPLE WAY. 
 

ergo, Hemingway is inarguably the greatest American author ever** (With the possible exception of F Scott Fitzgerald) And his work is the Zenith of what a writer can achieve...

...Provided of course you’ve never ever read anything by Zora Neale Hurston or Jim Thompson or James M Cain or Dashiell Hammett or CATCH-22, or ALL THE KINGS MEN or Alice Walker or (Overly discussed and dissected as she is) Toni Morrison or Truman Capote or (For all his cryptic hooey) William Faulkner or James Jones or Frank Norris or James Baldwin or Ralph Ellison. 

sure, Jan. 

 

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26 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I’m sorry, I’ve had a really terrible week and I’m extra salty lately. It just gets my goat how- In any discussion of “great literature” the works that are The easiest to digest and dissect, with paint by numbers symbolism, flat lifeless prose, and motifs with which the author chooses to slap the reader in the face repeatedly like a cold fish are ALWAYS LABELLED SUPERLATIVELY AS THE ****GREATEST OF ALL TIME*** AND IF YOU DONT SEE THAT, WELL THEN, LET ME PAT YOU ON THE HEAD,  HAND YOU A HARD CANDY TO SUCK ON AND SEND YOU ALONG YOUR SIMPLE WAY. 
 

ergo, Hemingway is inarguably the greatest American author ever** (With the possible exception of F Scott Fitzgerald) And his work is the Zenith of what a writer can achieve...

...Provided of course you’ve never ever read anything by Zora Neal Hurston or Jim Thompson or James M Cain or Dashiell Hammett or CATCH-22, or ALL THE KINGS MEN or Alice Walker or (Overly discussed and dissected as she is) Toni Morrison or Truman Capote or (For all his cryptic hooey) William Faulkner or James Jones or Frank Norris.

 

You're going to love what Hemingway wrote to Charles Scribner about James Jones. 

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