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3 hours ago, LuckyDan said:

Oh! 
just as an FYI, a lot (most?) of us NEVER wander from the General Discussion section. 
You might want to ask the moderator if they will move it into the general discussion section, *a lot* more people will notice it: trust me.

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(Or you could just open a new thread on your own and copy and paste everything you wrote into it.)

I don’t personally think I have wandered out of the “general discussions” once in the last three years.

(We are an Olde fashioned bunch here.)
 

**So much so in fact did the voice transcription on my phone automatically puts an E on the end of the word “olde.”

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Just now, LornaHansonForbes said:

Oh! 
just as an FYI, a lot (most?) of us NEVER wander from the General Discussion section. 
You might want to ask the moderator if they will move it into the general discussion section, *a lot* more people will notice it: trust me.

Not a bad thought, but at this point I think those of us who are interested have said all we have to say.

Since this doc wasn't as well-promoted as some of Burns' previous films, there may be more interest after the repeat airings and a little word-of-mouth advertising.

And I'm a big believer in the niche boards. Replies are fewer and farther between, but they usually come.

 

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47 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

(Or you could just open a new thread on your own and copy and paste everything you wrote into it.)

I don’t personally think I have wandered out of the “general discussions” once in the last three years.

(We are an Olde fashioned bunch here.)
 

**So much so in fact did the voice transcription on my phone automatically puts an E on the end of the word “olde.”

I remember when Geoff Chaucer used to post here. He once told me, "Yf ye are here on a smartphone, thanne scrollyng down to the genre forums ys troublesome."

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Murder By The Clock (1931)

Paramount released this old house thriller between Universal's releases of Dracula and Frankenstein. Today, with the film's Gothic look thanks to Karl Struss's striking black and white photography, many would be inclined to emphasize a horror element to be found in the production, as well as the mystery.

The story may seem familiar but it has some good touches. A wealthy crotchety old lady, fearful of being buried alive in her crypt, has a siren installed in it that can only be operated from the inside. She also has the usual collection of heirs hoping to get her estate. Among them is a lumbering half wit (Irving Pichel), as mentally feeble as he is physically strong, who likes to talk of his desire to kill someone. Naturally he will be the number one suspect if anything happens to anybody. But there is also the fashionable, sleek, conniving wife (Lilyan Tashman) of the old lady's son, despised by the old lady herself, but able to twist her weakling son around her greedy fingers.

Those used to the slow pace of early talkies (particularly if you can endure Dracula) will have an easier time enjoying this film than some others. There is also the deliberate measured unnatural delivery of dialogue, a curse of many early talkies, to be found here, though no worse than in other films of the time. But the film also has its pay off moments, the eerie siren in the crypt that we just know we are going to hear sooner or later (more than once in the film actually), along with the over the top performances of both Pichel and Tashman.

Tashman's manipulative villainess, while not be be taken seriously because of her somewhat tongue-in-cheek portrayal, is a schemer out for the estate who will commit no murders in the film herself but is ready to twist various weak willed males in the film into committing the crimes for her, all the while trying to maintain an air of innocence to the investigating detective (William "Stage" Boyd in an effectively hard boiled performance) who, incredibly, she also tries to seduce. There is just no stopping this woman. Tashman's blonde seductress can be seen as a forerunner to the femme fatales of '40s noirs. While her performance lacks subtlety she still remains a primary focus of interest in the film.

There is also one memorable moment in which an off screen murder takes place, with the camera remaining on Tashman's face throughout it. The expression on her face in reaction to the crime, with her hand motions emulating the strangulation she is watching,  can best be described as one of o r g a s m i c glee. Tashman, one of Hollywood's fashion plates at the time who was married to actor Edmund Lowe, would die of cancer three years after this film's release.

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An old fashioned "fun" thriller, Murder By The Clock has not, to the best of my knowledge, ever had a DVD release. There is, however, a soft looking print of it currently available on You Tube.

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2.5 out of 4

 

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On 4/2/2021 at 2:06 PM, speedracer5 said:

I was on a Robert Redford kick for awhile last year and watched Downhill Racer (which I loved), The Candidate (which I also loved), All the President's Men (which I also loved), then The Way We Were (which I did NOT love).  I wanted to watch Three Days of the Condor, but haven't gotten to it yet.  Normally, I'm not particularly into blonde men (I just don't find them attractive), but I made the exception for Redford.  I don't know what sets him apart from say, Paul Newman, but I'm Team Redford any day of the week. 

Yes, I’m also Team Redford versus Team Newman. As much as I want to like Paul Newman (or for some reason think that I *should* like him), he leaves me cold.

I also really like ALL THE PRESIDENT’S MEN.  It’s one of the most engrossing movies about journalists, mostly because it plays out like a detective story, with two young newspaper reporters uncovering clues that link members of the Nixon administration to the 1972 Watergate break-in. (The burglary and the administration’s attempts to cover up involvement in it grew into the scandal that ultimately led to the President’s resignation.) I especially like Robert Redford’s performance in the early parts of the investigation. There’s something very real and engaging in those scenes where Redford (as journalist Bob Woodward) is interviewing leads on the phone and taking notes and doodling. I also like the sequence where Woodward and his Washington Post colleague Carl Bernstein (Dustin Hoffman) try to locate and interview workers for the Committee to Re-elect the President (CREEP *haha!*) from a personnel list they obtain. The different reactions the reporters receive outside the doors of the committee workers’ homes are compelling. A favorite moment is when they finally find someone who is eager to talk but soon learn that she is not the CREEP worker they’re looking for, just someone with the same last name who is upset by the threat to the Constitution. 

 I haven’t seen THE CANDIDATE (another politically themed movie) yet, but I want to.

I do like THE WAY WE WERE quite a bit. Some of my fondness for it is rooted in nostalgia: it’s favorite movie of both my mother and grandmother so I have memories of them watching it during my childhood. But I’ve also enjoyed watching it as an adult even though it is an imperfect movie. Robert Redford and Barbra Streisand play two people who are “wrong for each other” but who fall in love and marry. The biggest problem with the movie is that the couple’s split when Streisand’s character is pregnant with Redford’s character’s child makes no sense, despite his one-night stand with the Lois Chiles character. Apparently, there were some scenes that were cut from the movie that were political in nature (the break-up occurred during the time of the Red Scare/Hollywood blacklist period --- Redford’s character is a screenwriter at this point on the story). The version with those scenes tested poorly with a preview audience while the version without the political scenes tested well.  Even with the plot holes in the released movie, there are a number of magical scenes that consistently move me.  One is the scene where the college professor reads one of Redford’s stories in class as an example of great writing. The way Redford’s face reveals his character’s modesty and pride is amazing to watch. (Streisand is also very good in this scene.)  Another magical scene is the final “years later” one at the end, where the divorced Redford and Streisand meet by chance. Redford’s look when he tells Streisand he can’t have drinks with her and her current husband! And Streisand’s when she responds “I know.”

I’ve never seen THREE DAYS OF THE CONDOR in its entirety. I tried watching it a few years ago (I think when it shown on TCM as part of Faye Dunaway’s Summer Under the Stars tribute). I couldn’t get into it then even though I’m a fan of Redford, Dunaway and director Sydney Pollack. Maybe it’s time to give this one another try.  This movie was one of the inspirations for CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER, which is streaming now on Disney+ . . .

Another Robert Redford movie I like is BAREFOOT IN THE PARK, adapted from the Neil Simon play. Redford plays the strait-laced newlywed that he also played on Broadway. In the movie adaptation, his free-spirited wife is played by Jane Fonda, who is fantastic in the role and so beautiful. Redford’s non-verbal reactions are hilarious! This was not a movie I expected to like.  I had the pre-conceived idea that it would be an un-funny gag-fest. However, when I saw it for the first time last year with my sweetie, we literally laughed out loud throughout it. We loved Mildred Natwick as the wife’s mother, who like Redford reprised her role from the original stage production. The three actors’ comic timing is impeccable and they play Simon’s dialogue “for real” rather than trying to hit the jokes. Charles Boyer plays a bohemian neighbor of the newlyweds that Jane Fonda’s character tries to set up with her mother. As a fan of 1960s fashions, I loved the wardrobe Edith Heath designed for Jane Fonda, especially her long-sleeved orange top with brown slacks and her sleeveless pink sheath (or was it a shift?) dress.   I had a major OUCH! moment when one of the characters slipped on an icy stoop. By the way, because the movie is set in New York City, I had previously thought that the “park” in the title was Central Park, but I discovered that it was actually Washington Square Park (the newlywed couple’s apartment is in Greenwich Village).

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27 minutes ago, HoldenIsHere said:

Yes, I’m also Team Redford versus Team Newman. As much as I want to like Paul Newman (or for some reason think that I *should* like him), he leaves me cold.

I’ve never seen THREE DAYS OF THE CONDOR in its entirety. I tried watching it a few years ago (I think when it shown on TCM as part of Faye Dunaway’s Summer Under the Stars tribute). I couldn’t get into it then even though I’m a fan of Redford, Dunaway and director Sydney Pollack. Maybe it’s time to give this one another try.  This movie was one of the inspirations for CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER, which is streaming now on Disney+ . . .

Yes, Redford's character in CA:tWS is very much a homage to Condor, which itself was Redford's Nixon-Era Activist Paranoia: the Movie.  Feels a little too much like a personal project, but nobody could do political-intrigue thrillers like the 70's.

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7 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

Yes, I’m also Team Redford

I loved THE CANDIDATE - hey it has Peter Boyle & Melvyn Douglas in it too! 

Have you seen the Redford directed  THE MILAGRO BEANFIELD WAR '88? I've heard really good things about it but cannot find it ANYWHERE, been looking for years. 

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The Red Violin (1999)

I first saw this movie on DVD not long after its release. I remember I was interested by the synopsis on the jacket that promised a story about the history of a particular violin as it passes through the hands of different owners over the course of time. This was not long after "The Antiques Roadshow" became popular, and the value and provenance of fine objects became a point of interest for me. And I'm sure the cover art caught my eye.

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I don't want to say too much about the key points of the story because while it is not flawless (clever viewers will probably guess soon enough where things are headed) it is well-crafted and when the end comes, quite poetic. 

A violin maker in Cremona, Nicoló Bussotti, and his wife Anna, are expecting a child, for whom Nicoló has constructed what he believes is the finest violin he has ever made. Anna has an older servant named Cesca who happens also to be a tarot card reader. Anna asks Cesca to read her child's fortune, but Cesca tells her she cannot read the fortune of someone who has not been born. She can, though, read Anna's fortune, and as she says to Anna, "Until the baby is born, your humors are one."  Anna selects five cards and as each is turned, a chapter is revealed.

The story is told with back-and-forth shifts in time between Cremona in the 1680s and Montreal in the 1990s, interspersed with closed-ended stories in Vienna (my favorite of the segments and by far the most moving), Oxford (where things get quite melodramatic), and Shanghai, pre and post-revolution. (I found the depiction of life in a totalitarian state very frank in this section, and noted parallels to our current cultural tensions.) 

The Cremona story unfolds over the course of the film and at its climax, we learn the peculiar secret of the red violin. In it, and in the Montreal story, where we see the auction house business behind the scenes, a device similar to The Conversation is used with the same action shown from different perspectives, and using repeated footage that goes a little further every time we see it, until finally, in Montreal, we find that all the modern-day representatives of each of the violin's past owners are in one room, bidding to regain possession, and in Cremona, we learn why Cesca was able to foresee the story we now know.

Along the way there are stunning scenes of the various locales, especially in Europe and China. The music is, oddly, not always particularly memorable despite the virtuosity of Joshua Bell, though it is impressive when you hear it. I found myself wondering what Ennio Morricone would have done with this opportunity.

Irene Grazioli is very sympathetic as the mother anxious about childbirth at what she feels is advanced age, though she appears healthful and well within child-bearing years. I found the young violinist Christoph Koncz's portrayal of child prodigy and orphan Kasper Weiss in Vienna quite touching. (I have posted some excerpts from his segment here.) I enjoyed the depiction of his relationship with his teacher, played well by Jean-Luc Bideu. Jason Flemyng and Greta Scacchi play the eccentric virtuoso and his muse in the Oxford segment and now, after seeing it twice, it is apparent that this chapter was meant as serio-comic relief and, viewed in that light, they shine. Most impressive is Sylvia Chang in dual roles as, briefly, the mother of a young violinist in pre-Maoist China, and, more fully, the grown violinist after the revolution. Also noteworthy in this segment is Liu Zi Feng, who plays a teacher of Western music made to face public humiliation, and possibly death, for his love of Beethoven and Prokofiev.

And Samuel Jackson. I don't know but I think, as talented as he is, he missed in this one. He just looks like he's up to something. He acts like he's up to something. Even before his character decides to be up to something. I won't say he was miscast, but if I understand his character, and I think I do, then his director should have spoken to him. "Don't shift your eyes. Not in this scene. That comes later." "Too much. Why do you care if he plays the violin? Cooler."

The screenplay was co-written by director François Girard (who made a previous film about music, Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould) and Don McKellar, who appears as a restorer of instruments.

If you like period pieces, violins, or any instruments, antiques, history, if you have a soft-spot for children, for mothers, if you enjoy plot puzzles, take a look at this one. I think it is very well told. 

It is streaming free on Tubi, but while I normally don't mind ad breaks, I wish tonight I'd coughed up the $1.99 to see it without interruption on Redbox.

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Saw Red Violin on TV and liked it.  The other night, I rewatched In and Out (the one with Tom Selleck, Kevin Kline, Debbie Reynolds, Joan Cusack and Matt Dillon).  There is another movie by the same name but has nothing to do with the movie I watched.  Basic plot - while accepting an Oscar, Dillon claims that Kline is gay (he and Selleck are both gay, however, they have long-term marriages to women, so don't care if they are in real life). As he has shown in many movies, Kline can literally move (does the same in A Fish Called Wanda).  Re-enforces stereotypes about homosexuals, but I still like it and to quote J. Brown in Some Like it Hot, "Nobody's Perfect."

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On 4/10/2021 at 11:50 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

**CAVEAT For anyone thinking of checking out the Hemingway documentary: 

there are A LOT of EXPLICIT photos of dead bodies- Not just from the Wars, but especially from the 1935 hurricane that destroyed the Florida keys. I  verymuch wish they had prefaced the documentary series with a warning.

This reminds me of something Blanche says in The Golden Girls:

(paraphrasing, because I can't remember the exact quote)

BLANCHE on why she doesn't watch the news: "Once in awhile, they'll slip a dead body in on you.  You'll be watching a nice little story about children in Central America and boom! Dead body."

Thank you for that caveat though, I always hate when Forensic Files slips in a shot of the body.

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Thanks to the local library, I saw The Pajama Game, not available for TCM's SOTM tribute to Doris Day. Too bad, because The Pajama Game keeps most of the excellent Richard Adler/Jerry Ross score (including "Hey There," "Hernando's Hideaway," "There Once Was a Man," "Steam Heat" among others); the stars can actually sing; some of the cast is from the Broadway show; and although this isn't on a par with Stanley Donen's musical direction at its very best (Singin' in the Rain, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers), it's still very good.

Doris Day gets to play another of those plucky hard-working career gals, both strong and traditionally feminine, the perfect kind of role for her. I can see why John Raitt never became a big Hollywood star: not only were musicals on their way out as a staple of studio filmmaking, Raitt doesn't project much charm or even have much expression in his face--until he sings, that is. Raitt is a lyric baritone with strong top notes, and when he sings, he smiles and has all the charm that a star needs. Doris Day is one of the great popular singers, with the art that conceals art, the exact opposite of the style favored on the current TV singing competitions. Every moment of her songs sounds musical and sounds stylistically right, with clear diction taken for granted. One never sees the wheels turning or hears the singer deliberately making choices about phrasing.

Raitt and Day are wonderful together in the wittily staged "There Once Was a Man." Bob Fosse's choreography for "Steam Heat" was new and stunning when he first created it. The zany Carol Haney has always been a favorite of mine, a great dancer with a memorable frog-in-the-throat voice and all the energy in the world. Reta Shaw is another favorite.

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7 hours ago, kingrat said:

Thanks to the local library, I saw The Pajama Game, not available for TCM's SOTM tribute to Doris Day. Too bad, because The Pajama Game keeps most of the excellent Richard Adler/Jerry Ross score (including "Hey There," "Hernando's Hideaway," "There Once Was a Man," "Steam Heat" among others); the stars can actually sing; some of the cast is from the Broadway show; and although this isn't on a par with Stanley Donen's musical direction at its very best (Singin' in the Rain, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers), it's still very good.

Doris Day gets to play another of those plucky hard-working career gals, both strong and traditionally feminine, the perfect kind of role for her. I can see why John Raitt never became a big Hollywood star: not only were musicals on their way out as a staple of studio filmmaking, Raitt doesn't project much charm or even have much expression in his face--until he sings, that is. Raitt is a lyric baritone with strong top notes, and when he sings, he smiles and has all the charm that a star needs. Doris Day is one of the great popular singers, with the art that conceals art, the exact opposite of the style favored on the current TV singing competitions. Every moment of her songs sounds musical and sounds stylistically right, with clear diction taken for granted. One never sees the wheels turning or hears the singer deliberately making choices about phrasing.

Raitt and Day are wonderful together in the wittily staged "There Once Was a Man." Bob Fosse's choreography for "Steam Heat" was new and stunning when he first created it. The zany Carol Haney has always been a favorite of mine, a great dancer with a memorable frog-in-the-throat voice and all the energy in the world. Reta Shaw is another favorite.

Is that BONNIE RAITT’s father?

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10 hours ago, kingrat said:

Thanks to the local library, I saw The Pajama Game, not available for TCM's SOTM tribute to Doris Day. Too bad, because The Pajama Game keeps most of the excellent Richard Adler/Jerry Ross score (including "Hey There," "Hernando's Hideaway," "There Once Was a Man," "Steam Heat" among others); the stars can actually sing; some of the cast is from the Broadway show; and although this isn't on a par with Stanley Donen's musical direction at its very best (Singin' in the Rain, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers), it's still very good.

Doris Day gets to play another of those plucky hard-working career gals, both strong and traditionally feminine, the perfect kind of role for her. I can see why John Raitt never became a big Hollywood star: not only were musicals on their way out as a staple of studio filmmaking, Raitt doesn't project much charm or even have much expression in his face--until he sings, that is. Raitt is a lyric baritone with strong top notes, and when he sings, he smiles and has all the charm that a star needs. Doris Day is one of the great popular singers, with the art that conceals art, the exact opposite of the style favored on the current TV singing competitions. Every moment of her songs sounds musical and sounds stylistically right, with clear diction taken for granted. One never sees the wheels turning or hears the singer deliberately making choices about phrasing.

Raitt and Day are wonderful together in the wittily staged "There Once Was a Man." Bob Fosse's choreography for "Steam Heat" was new and stunning when he first created it. The zany Carol Haney has always been a favorite of mine, a great dancer with a memorable frog-in-the-throat voice and all the energy in the world. Reta Shaw is another favorite.

It's NEVER available on TCM! :(

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42 minutes ago, Hibi said:

It's NEVER available on TCM! :(

It's generally not available on any service, unless you want to buy or rent it.  Same with their other filmed musical, Damn Yankees.

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On 4/11/2021 at 8:25 PM, HoldenIsHere said:

I’ve never seen THREE DAYS OF THE CONDOR in its entirety. I tried watching it a few years ago (I think when it shown on TCM as part of Faye Dunaway’s Summer Under the Stars tribute). I couldn’t get into it then even though I’m a fan of Redford, Dunaway and director Sydney Pollack. Maybe it’s time to give this one another try. 

One of my all time favorites and apparently of Ben Mankiewicz's as well. He's referred to it as "the perfect movie".  The geopolitics and intel community aspects are just as relevant today. The chemistry between Redford and Dunaway works in a Stockholm syndrome sorta way.  I guess when you look like Redford did, you can pull that off.

It has come under the censorship knife though. There is a scene where the word 'homosexual' was cut to, sexual.  What makes it irksome is that there doesn't seem to be any reason to do it other than it's presented -along with several others- as a possible cause of Condor's curious behavior. 

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

It's generally not available on any service, unless you want to buy or rent it.  Same with their other filmed musical, Damn Yankees.

Yep!

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12 hours ago, kingrat said:

The Pajama Game keeps most of the excellent Richard Adler/Jerry Ross score (including "Hey There," "Hernando's Hideaway," "There Once Was a Man," "Steam Heat" among others); the stars can actually sing; some of the cast is from the Broadway show;

I love this one too. I have only seen it once many years ago but I remember most of it, especially the songs. "Seven And Half Cents' is another one, a witty song about getting a small raise.

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On 4/12/2021 at 6:23 AM, TikiSoo said:

I loved THE CANDIDATE - hey it has Peter Boyle & Melvyn Douglas in it too! 

Have you seen the Redford directed  THE MILAGRO BEANFIELD WAR '88? I've heard really good things about it but cannot find it ANYWHERE, been looking for years. 

I haven't seen THE MILAGRO BEANFIELD WAR.

The only Robert Redford directed movies I've seen are ORDINARY PEOPLE (seen this one a few times, at least three times in its entirety) and A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT.

ORDINARY PEOPLE is set (and exterior scenes and a few interior scenes were filmed) in the North Shore suburbs of Chicago, where I grew up. 

 

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42 minutes ago, HoldenIsHere said:

The only Robert Redford directed movies I've seen are ORDINARY PEOPLE (seen this one a few times, at least three times in its entirety) and A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT.

Quiz Show (1994) is actually pretty good--mostly for the real-life story and Ralph Fiennes' performance--and doesn't turn leftwing-soapbox until the last ten minutes, when Martin Scorsese shows up to play the Snidely Whiplash of pop culture.

"Lions For Lambs", however, will make you either cringe, facepalm, or giggle in kitschy nostalgia at how what we thought were the "angry" GWBush 00's had nothing on the last four years.

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I watched LADIES IN RETIREMENT (1941) on TCM...kind of like watching THE BRONTE SISTERS in NIGHT MUST FALL.

I have to be honest with you guys, I’m not in a very good mood lately but I really didn’t like this film *at all.*

Forgive the lack of eloquence, but man did the ending SUCK. 

On a letter grading scale I would give it an F.

NOT RECOMMENDED AT ALL.

BOO!

Hiss!

[hurls rotten tomato]
[head of lettuce]
[dead cat]

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I watched LADIES IN RETIREMENT (1941) on TCM...kind of like watching THE BRONTE SISTERS in NIGHT MUST FALL.

I have to be honest with you guys, I’m not in a very good mood lately but I really didn’t like this film *at all.*

Forgive the lack of eloquence, but man did the ending SUCK. 

On a letter grading scale I would give it an F.

NOT RECOMMENDED AT ALL.

BOO!

Hiss!

[hurls rotten tomato]
[head of lettuce]
[dead cat]

One thing is certain, there is no way it sucked harder than Lions for Lambs. If you had watched that your mood would have been irredeemable. 

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On 4/11/2021 at 6:22 AM, LuckyDan said:

Not a bad thought, but at this point I think those of us who are interested have said all we have to say.

Since this doc wasn't as well-promoted as some of Burns' previous films, there may be more interest after the repeat airings and a little word-of-mouth advertising.

And I'm a big believer in the niche boards. Replies are fewer and farther between, but they usually come.

 

It may not have been well promoted, but boy, was it good! 

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