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On 4/16/2021 at 6:50 PM, laffite said:

What an adorable photo. What adorable gams. Betty, move over.

1188918958_BlondellJoan_01.jpg.0153de1c7d3515839dbd9398aa7e16c7.jpg

Just a little more suggestive. She's so adorable & happy, she doesn't come across sleazy at all.

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10 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

YES!!! Love that movie. My kind of schmaltz. 

Thanks for that succinct impression. I have it recorded from TCM, but haven't watched it yet. 

On 4/16/2021 at 11:53 PM, laffite said:

I had a similar experience with Casablanca, but I got lucky, I loved it. Of course C will always be more popular than CK.

I've never cared for CASABLANCA, don't really know why. One view was plenty, although I would see it on the big screen to see if that makes a difference for me.

I was overwhelmed by Citizen Kane first time viewing but enjoyed it enough to give it another go. I like it more every viewing and would estimate seen it about 20 times. 

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On 4/16/2021 at 6:38 PM, laffite said:

What brought to me to the movie in the first place was Eleanor Bron. I loved her in Women in Love (1969), herself as an actor, if not exactly her character of whom It might be difficult to love.

To be fair, it's difficult to like anything about Women in Love.

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13 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

I've never cared for CASABLANCA, don't really know why. One view was plenty, although I would see it on the big screen to see if that makes a difference for me.

That's because you haven't seen the original ending:

 

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2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

 

I've never cared for CASABLANCA, don't really know why. One view was plenty, although I would see it on the big screen to see if that makes a difference for me.

I was born in 1978 and I think I first saw CASABLANCA some time in the 1990s (probably when it came out on VHS), and I was disappointed because I felt as though I had seen it already, because the film is so quoted and so parodied and had been aped and paid tribute to so much, it was like reading HAMLET and recognizing all the various novels of plays and books as you go, there were lines that i did not even realize originated with CASABLANCA.

many viewings later I love it dearly,

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2 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I was born in 1978 and I think I first saw CASABLANCA some time in the 1990s (probably when it came out on VHS), and I was disappointed because I felt as though I had seen it already, because the film is so quoted and so parodied and had been aped and paid tribute to so much, it was like reading HAMLET and recognizing all the various novels of plays and books as you go, there were lines that i did not even realize originated with CASABLANCA.

many viewings later I love it dearly,

I think it was the first pre-recorded rental movie I saw, sometime in the early 80s, on my parent's Betamax.  It's the first one I remember, anyway.

Here's an old LA Times article written when Ted Turner's MGM/UA released the colorized version to the home video market at $79. 95 (which is about $170 today!)

https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1989-02-17-ca-3062-story.html

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as a jaded cineaste, I like to deliberately leave certain immensely popular titles unseen so that i don't get to a stage where I've seen everything and thus have no reason to live.

so, with that, I come out with what some of you may find shocking: before this morning, I had never seen THE LAST PICTURE SHOW (1971.)

I have now.

JESUS CHRIST what a depressing, oppressive, and immensely compelling movie this is.

OIP.gn8iEGiIgqA0G-9usv_5IgHaEI?pid=ImgDe GREAT ACTING WITH SUNGLASSES 101

I really enjoyed the first half immensely, the second half is not meant to be enjoyed, but I was impressed nonetheless.

HARD TO BELIEVE BEN JOHNSON is only in this for EIGHT MINUTES!

Why did things not work out for TIMOTHY BOTTOMS as an actor? He pull a LEE TRACY at the Beverly Hill Hotel or something? He was really very good in this, but, I have to say WHAT A FILM FOR GREAT PERFORMANCES BY ACTRESSES this is.

I did not realize that EILEEN BRENNAN was in this film. On this Sunday, I would like to thank God for creating EILEEN BRENNAN, and just wish He had not dropped and broke the mold afterwards. I would watch EILEEN BRENNAN READS ALOUD FROM THE SANTA MONICA PHONEBOOK WITH A CIGARETTE DANGLING FROM HER LIP: THE MOTION PICTURE in a HEARTBEAT.

And CLORIS LEACHMAN, who does some amazing acting in the final 15 minutes, and thank heavens her scene was included! I can't imagine the film ending any other way. (AND MORE AMBIGUOUSLY THAN i THOUGHT IT WOULD!)

But I think I was MOST IMPRESSED by ELLEN BURSTYN -and would have been gleefully, whole-heartedly thrilled were this movie ENTIRELY ABOUT HER.

IT'S A GORGEOUS film, would make a great companion piece to AMERICAN GRAFFITI.

Not recommended for anyone struggling with depression though.

 

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6 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

I did not realize that EILEEN BRENNAN was in this film. On this Sunday, I would like to thank God for creating EILEEN BRENNAN, and just wish He had not dropped and broke the mold afterwards. I would watch EILEEN BRENNAN READS ALOUD FROM THE SANTA MONICA PHONEBOOK WITH A CIGARETTE DANGLING FROM HER LIP: THE MOTION PICTURE in a HEARTBEAT.

 

It's been mostly forgotten after she achieved fame in film, but Eileen Brennan was also on Broadway; she played Irene Malloy to Carol Channing's Dolly in the original run of Hello, Dolly!  

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2 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

It's been mostly forgotten after she achieved fame in film, but Eileen Brennan was also on Broadway; she played Irene Malloy to Carol Channing's Dolly in the original run of Hello, Dolly!  

I was watching MURDER BY DEATH (1976) for the 45th time last week, and I like PETER FALK, but he is SO ABRASIVE in that film (and his racist dialogue rubbed me wrong all these years later), but BRENNAN plays off of him LIKE THE OBVIOUS PRO SHE WAS and really saves his charcterization.

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31 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I had never seen THE LAST PICTURE SHOW (1971.)I have now.

JESUS CHRIST what a depressing, oppressive, and immensely compelling movie this is.

OIP.gn8iEGiIgqA0G-9usv_5IgHaEI?pid=ImgDe

IT'S A GORGEOUS film, would make a great companion piece to AMERICAN GRAFFITI.

Not recommended for anyone struggling with depression though.

 

Another that will stay on the DVR and gets viewed occasionally at Moe's. I don't find it depressing, there's a feel of isolation with the barren landscape. Not the best setting for a coming of age type film perhaps. But it has Cybill Shephard, and it's hard to be depressed when there's a chance for a date there. It's no Heartbreak Kid, but it'll do in a pinch.

If you want to cobble together a double feature, I'd suggest Hud. Same feel, same style. Almost like 'meantime over at Newman's ranch there's a hoof and mouth outbreak'.  Now THAT is depressing. 

 

 

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23 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

as a jaded cineaste, I like to deliberately leave certain immensely popular titles unseen so that i don't get to a stage where I've seen everything and thus have no reason to live.

so, with that, I come out with what some of you may find shocking: before this morning, I had never seen THE LAST PICTURE SHOW (1971.)

I have now.

JESUS CHRIST what a depressing, oppressive, and immensely compelling movie this is.

There is no "like" button big enough for those sentences.

Lorna, I do the same thing, avoiding some well thought of movies to keep for "later".  I've never seen FIDDLER ON THE ROOF because I like generational, historical & musical genres & sure to love it. I waited recently to see FUNNY GIRL and LAWRENCE OF ARABIA-both seen while bedridden during long illness. Last Picture Show is one of those, although I saw it when it first came out-imagine the impact seeing it in a theater full of people! You could hear a pin drop. 

I love LPS and have an original movie still of Bottoms & Bridges in a diner seat in my kitchen. Bottoms was in another good movie LOVE & PAIN & THE WHOLE DAMN THING '73 a younger man/older woman romance (a personal favorite subject of mine-growl) along the same vein of SUMMERTIME and GOODBYE AGAIN.

Thank God Bogdanovich made this. Every performance is so compelling, made me a lifetime fan of all. Best line is Jacey: "Is that all? I think you did something wrong because that can't be all there is!" a fun line to use around those who don't get it.

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13 minutes ago, Moe Howard said:

Another that will stay on the DVR and gets viewed occasionally at Moe's. I don't find it depressing, there's a feel of isolation with the barren landscape. Not the best setting for a coming of age type film perhaps. 

If you want to cobble together a double feature, I'd suggest Hud. Same feel, same style. Almost like 'meantime over at Newman's ranch there's a hoof and mouth outbreak'.  Now THAT is depressing. 

 

 

Both are based on Larry McMurtry books, which is why they seem so similar.

I always get a kick out of Red River being the last picture show.   The western cattle trails (Chisholm Trail, etc) from Texas up into Kansas would have gone through some of the same area you see in The Last Picture Show (area west of present-day I-35), and TLPS gives you a better idea of the landscape than the mesas and mountains you see in Red River.

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3 hours ago, Fedya said:

To be fair, it's difficult to like anything about Women in Love.

To be fair? It's not fair to say it stinks and nothing else.

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8 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

Both are based on Larry McMurtry books, which is why they seem so similar.

I always get a kick out of Red River being the last picture show.   The western cattle trails (Chisholm Trail, etc) from Texas up into Kansas would have gone through some of the same area you see in The Last Picture Show (area west of present-day I-35), and TLPS gives you a better idea of the landscape than the mesas and mountains you see in Red River.

I am also a big fan of HANK WILLIAMS SR., and the use of his music on the soundtrack was pretty brilliant (and definitely an influential decision)

No one wrote lyrics quite like HANK.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

as a jaded cineaste, I like to deliberately leave certain immensely popular titles unseen so that i don't get to a stage where I've seen everything and thus have no reason to live.

so, with that, I come out with what some of you may find shocking: before this morning, I had never seen THE LAST PICTURE SHOW (1971.)

I have now.

JESUS CHRIST what a depressing, oppressive, and immensely compelling movie this is.

OIP.gn8iEGiIgqA0G-9usv_5IgHaEI?pid=ImgDe GREAT ACTING WITH SUNGLASSES 101

I really enjoyed the first half immensely, the second half is not meant to be enjoyed, but I was impressed nonetheless.

HARD TO BELIEVE BEN JOHNSON is only in this for EIGHT MINUTES!

Why did things not work out for TIMOTHY BOTTOMS as an actor? He pull a LEE TRACY at the Beverly Hill Hotel or something? He was really very good in this, but, I have to say WHAT A FILM FOR GREAT PERFORMANCES BY ACTRESSES this is.

I did not realize that EILEEN BRENNAN was in this film. On this Sunday, I would like to thank God for creating EILEEN BRENNAN, and just wish He had not dropped and broke the mold afterwards. I would watch EILEEN BRENNAN READS ALOUD FROM THE SANTA MONICA PHONEBOOK WITH A CIGARETTE DANGLING FROM HER LIP: THE MOTION PICTURE in a HEARTBEAT.

And CLORIS LEACHMAN, who does some amazing acting in the final 15 minutes, and thank heavens her scene was included! I can't imagine the film ending any other way. (AND MORE AMBIGUOUSLY THAN i THOUGHT IT WOULD!)

But I think I was MOST IMPRESSED by ELLEN BURSTYN -and would have been gleefully, whole-heartedly thrilled were this movie ENTIRELY ABOUT HER.

IT'S A GORGEOUS film, would make a great companion piece to AMERICAN GRAFFITI.

Not recommended for anyone struggling with depression though.

 

Texasville (1990) is the sequel, but is a much different movie.   Another McMurtry book and with the same director and cast for most part.  In color and not like The Last Picture Show.  Set 33 years after TLPS

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

1188918958_BlondellJoan_01.jpg.0153de1c7d3515839dbd9398aa7e16c7.jpg

Just a little more suggestive. She's so adorable & happy, she doesn't come across sleazy at all.

That's the difference the smile makes. 

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32 minutes ago, ElCid said:

Texasville (1990) is the sequel, but is a much different movie.   Another McMurtry book and with the same director and cast for most part.  In color and not like The Last Picture Show.  Set 33 years after TLPS

yeah, I went and instantly read up on TEXASVILLE after i finshed LAST PICTURE.

I can't imagine seeing these characters in color.

oddly enough, AFTER READing the premise for TEXASVILLE, I have to say i think it would have made for an interesting TV SHOW.

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sort of spoiler in re: THE LAST PICTURE SHOW

The part where the PREACHER'S PECULIAR SON kidnaps the little girl was a total gut-punch, but in retrospect- probably the high point of the film, or at least the most effective. Just...wow/ a GREAT example of how to subtly work in a parallel story within a movie and then take us on a sort of cul-de-sac off the main street where it's not a distraction or a waste of time and it only adds to the experience.

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A few months ago I watched an Ellen Burstyn interview and she discussed what is probably one of my favorite scenes in "The Last Picture Show":

Burstyn's first Oscar nod came in 1972, as Lois Farrow, mother to Cybill Shepherd, in "The Last Picture Show." it was her first big role in film, with Peter Bogdanovich as director.

"We had a scene where I hear my lover drive up. Oh good. My lover's here! And I'm just about to open the door, and my daughter comes in. And then I realize, Oh, it's not my lover coming to see me, it's my daughter – oh my God, my daughter's in bed with my lover!

"So, I said, 'Peter. I have eight different things to express here, and I don't have a line.' And he went, 'I know.'"

"And I said, 'How am I supposed to do that?' And he said, 'Just think the thoughts of the character, and the camera will read your mind.' That was the most important acting-for-film lesson I ever got. It was just brilliant.

 
 
 
 

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16 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

sort of spoiler in re: THE LAST PICTURE SHOW

The part where the PREACHER'S PECULIAR SON kidnaps the little girl was a total gut-punch, but in retrospect- probably the high point of the film, or at least the most effective. Just...wow/ a GREAT example of how to subtly work in a parallel story within a movie and then take us on a sort of cul-de-sac off the main street where it's not a distraction or a waste of time and it only adds to the experience.

Believe it or not, I thought it was a way to move away from the main path of the story and give us all a bit of a break.  Don't get your "gut punch" idea, but too, Peter saw a chance to throw in another sort of "comic relief" moment at the end of the segment when we see all the menfolk walking the distraught mother to her car and all seemingly forgetting the little girl they were supposed to be so concerned about walk silently unnoticed about 20 yards behind everybody. 

Sepiatone

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6 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Believe it or not, I thought it was a way to move away from the main path of the story and give us all a bit of a break.  Don't get your "gut punch" idea, but too, Peter saw a chance to throw in another sort of "comic relief" moment at the end of the segment when we see all the menfolk walking the distraught mother to her car and all seemingly forgetting the little girl they were supposed to be so concerned about walk silently unnoticed about 20 yards behind everybody. 

Sepiatone

I read DARK, SINISTER, MESSED UP THINGS INTO IT. MY mind tends to go there (there being THE GUTTER)

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13 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

A few months ago I watched an Ellen Burstyn interview and she discussed what is probably one of my favorite scenes in "The Last Picture Show":

Burstyn's first Oscar nod came in 1972, as Lois Farrow, mother to Cybill Shepherd, in "The Last Picture Show." it was her first big role in film, with Peter Bogdanovich as director.

"We had a scene where I hear my lover drive up. Oh good. My lover's here! And I'm just about to open the door, and my daughter comes in. And then I realize, Oh, it's not my lover coming to see me, it's my daughter – oh my God, my daughter's in bed with my lover!

"So, I said, 'Peter. I have eight different things to express here, and I don't have a line.' And he went, 'I know.'"

"And I said, 'How am I supposed to do that?' And he said, 'Just think the thoughts of the character, and the camera will read your mind.' That was the most important acting-for-film lesson I ever got. It was just brilliant.

 
 
 
 

i WAS STUNNEDto see CLU GULAGER in a LEGIT film. I truly thought he was of a CONRAD BROOKS type, strictly Z-MOVIE ACTOR, heretofore I would've thought RETURN OF THE LIVING DEAD was his career  high-point, his LOST WEEKEND if you will.

CLU made quite a few appearances in some films featured on MST 3K and RIFFTRAX.

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