Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

31 minutes ago, nakano said:

Becky Sharp  1935 directed by Rouben Mamoulian

With Miriam Hopkins Frances Dee Nigel Bruce Billie Burke Cedric Hardwicke Alan Mowbray.Made by Pioneer Pictures distributed by RKO.Set in early 1800's England during the Napoleonic wars good comedy drama main  feature  are the  beautiful pastels as it is the first film made in 3 strip Technicolor. Frances Dee in Technicolor is  quite something    but Alan Mowbray as a romantic interest  is quite unusual i have seen him in many films but not in this type of role..anyway I have never seen this film on TCM and it was not featured on her Star of the Month tribute  There must be a rights problem , I watched it in Canada yesterday. 6/10

becky.jpg

Not sure if there's a rights issue now, but in the past they would show it occasionally.

Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, nakano said:

Carnival Story was a premiere several months ago. So you are right!

Actually, I recorded Carnival Story a number of years ago off TCM. I don't know if it's been on since but if it was on a few months ago, as you say, hopefully it will be back. I believe the film has fallen into public domain so beware of inferior quality copies. It can be found on You Tube.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

image-w448.jpg?1481152266

A Brief Vacation (1973) Florinda Bolkan, Renato Salvatori, Daniel Quenaud. 

One of the last films of director Vittorio De Sica.  Bolkan plays Clara, a worker in a noisy, dirty, very un-modern

factory in Milan. Back at home she has an unsympathetic hubby, a bumptious brother-in-law, and a whinny mother-

in-law. The only saving grace are her three young children. Clara begins to feel sick at her job and is sent for a

check up. She is found to have small spots on her lungs and is sent for treatment to a TB clinic in the mountains,

a kind of Italian version of The Magic Mountain. Away from her family she is able to relax, rest, and do a little

reading. She also falls in with a group of well off TB patients who take her into their group and show her a new

world of possibilities. She also falls in love with a fellow patient she had met before back in Milan. She is clearly enjoying

her new life. The doctors tell her she is now cured and can go back to Milan. She hesitates a bit and then, somewhat

reluctantly, gets on the train back home. The final shot of the movie shows her in the train, entering a rundown

section of Milan with her future unresolved, but not looking very appealing. De Sica weaves in themes like class,

capitalism, and the Italian health care system into Clara's personal story and the two mesh in interesting ways.

(There is also a good joke about Marx's beard). It's difficult not to feel sorry for Clara as her brief vacation ends

and she heads back to her status quo. All in all, a very well done film.

  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/2/2019 at 9:47 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

Was visiting family this weekend. they have DEE'S KNEE PLUS, so I had a FASCINATING double feature of THE BLACK CAULDRON (1985)- which I had not seen in YEARS- and FROZEN (2014?), which I had heretofore managed to avoid.

I don't go to movie theaters anymore, but from the early eighties up to about 2004, I used to go ALL THE TIME, and TO THIS DAY, i can still recall (I was eight years old) THE AUDIENCE REACTION to THE BLACK CAULDRON in THE THEATER, which- to approximate it crudely- FELL INTO ONE OF THE FOLLOWING TWO CATEGORIES:

The older kids/ parents:

tumblr_ma69fkGNiW1rdutw3o1_r1_400.gif

THE YOUNGER children:

http://www.reactiongifs.com/r/arsenio.gif

GOD BLESS THE EIGHTIES, MAN.

Anyhoo, seeing it all these years later, it makes me miss HANDDRAWN ANIMATION- this film is SO GORGEOUS. There is a decidedly truncated feel to it- but that is because about 10 minutes of footage were excised for being deemed "too ****ed up even for 1985."

Remembered this the other day after hearing that The Black Cauldron was getting a Blu-Ray release. Still makes me laugh.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/18/2021 at 9:40 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

as a jaded cineaste, I like to deliberately leave certain immensely popular titles unseen so that i don't get to a stage where I've seen everything and thus have no reason to live.

so, with that, I come out with what some of you may find shocking: before this morning, I had never seen THE LAST PICTURE SHOW (1971.)

I have now.

JESUS CHRIST what a depressing, oppressive, and immensely compelling movie this is.

I watched THE LAST PICTURE SHOW myself recently and thought about writing about it in this thread. It was the third viewing for me. It’s one of my favorite movies (possibly in my top five) and Peter Bogdanovich is one of my favorite directors.  I can watch TLPS, WHAT’S UP, DOC? and PAPER MOON again and again.

*** There will be SPOILERS. ***

It had been few years since I’d seen the entire movie. I knew that Sam the Lion (Ben Johnson) died, and I found myself wondering what happened to Billy after Sam died. I had forgotten that Billy was hit by truck and died near the end of the movie. I don’t think the movie explained how Sam came to be Billy’s guardian. Maybe Larry McMurtry’s source novel did? (I’ve read the book, but it has been many years.)

Cloris Leachman was still appearing regularly as a “special guest star” on THE MARY TYLER MOORE SHOW when TLPS was released and when she won her Oscar for the movie. The closing credits that Bogdanovich uses in TLPS – with the names of the main actors and their roles superimposed over a clip of them from the movie – are similar to the actor credits that appear in the end titles of THE MTM SHOW.

On this viewing the moment that really tugged at my heart was the one after the literal last picture show  when Miss Mosey (who had inherited the town’s movie theater when Sam the Lion died) talks to Sonny (Timothy Bottoms) and Duane (Jeff Bridges) as they are leaving the theater after the final screening. She tells them that Sam probably could have kept the theater going but that she “didn’t have the know-how.” The sadness in her voice and on her face when she speaks those words! Miss Mosey was played by Jessie Lee Fulton who appeared in only a few other movies (one of which was Bogdanovich’s PAPER MOON).

U52vbts.png

 

U71nNEp.png

 

nGrrFLZ.png

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Remembered this the other day after hearing that The Black Cauldron was getting a Blu-Ray release. Still makes me laugh.

 Especially since the reaction of older-kid Lloyd Alexander book fans--and the Disney fans following three years of cool concept art in news stories about the studio shakeup--was:

0Zhocf.gif

(Even watching it on Disney+ years later, to see if it improved a la Hercules and Treasure Planet, that John Byner voice haunts some of us theater victims to this day...   😑 )

At least Fantasia 1940/2000 is also getting a Blu-ray update, and I can now throw out that early-10's release from the days when Disney tried to cheapskate on disks by putting their Bonus Features on "Virtual Vault" BD-Live...

Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, PATRICK GERARD said:

I Want You FilmPoster.jpeg

I really disliked this film.  Maybe it was too tied to the time.  I will say that Dorothy McGuire's acting was very clear in the character's hypocrisy.  You will have to see the film to understand.

I started watching this and didn’t make it far. 
it’s a shame though, I’m very interested in the Korean War, it really is America’s forgotten conflict.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Visit to a Small Planet (1960)

 

A juvenile delinquent plays hooky and visits Earth so he can watch American Civil War. His piloting skills are as bad as his study habits and so he lands ninety-nine years late in an upper-middle-class suburb on the day of a costume party. 

I am not a fan of Jerry Lewis. His mugging and crude freneticism is unrestrained in this movie. Compensation is the splendid supporting cast. Earl Holliman, Fred Clark, John Williams, Joan Blackman,  Jerome Cowan, Gale Gordon and Lee Patrick each add their inimitable charm and humour to the production.

6.1/9

Available for viewing free with commercials on: PlutoTV. 

  • Thanks 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SansFin said:

Visit to a Small Planet (1960)

A juvenile delinquent plays hooky and visits Earth so he can watch American Civil War. His piloting skills are as bad as his study habits and so he lands ninety-nine years late in an upper-middle-class suburb on the day of a costume party. 

It's also worth noting that 1960 briefly started a Centennial fad for Civil War lore and costume re-enactions (which the movie tapped into, unlike the play).

Much like the 70's during the Bicentennial, only shorter and less goofy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Confessions of an Opium Eater Poster

Confessions Of An Opium Eater (1962) DVD 7/10

An adventurer (Vincent Price) in 19th century San Francisco becomes involved with Tong wars, slave auctions of Chinese girls and opium dens.

This is one of the most bizarre films I have ever seen. even more jaw dropping that it got made in 1962. It is exploitation madness at it's best. Price however brings his great talent and class to make this a cut above other strange films made in the 1960s. All the Asian roles are played by real Asians such as busy character actors like Richard Loo and Philip Ahn. Linda Ho (I mentioned her a few days ago when talking about Hillbillys In A Haunted House) plays an evil "Mata Hari" type. She is deliciously nasty and smolderingly sexy in this part, probably the best role she ever had in her short film career.  When Price settles down with a pipe in an opium den, there is a incredible druggy fight sequence all done in slow motion, it has to be seen to be believed. Another highlight is a wisecracking female Chinese dwarf (Alicia Li) who provides some wickedly funny quips. It ends with an auction scene where girls are sold for opium. They do some suggestive dances which most have seemed scandalous at the time. Price fans and anyone interested in something weird should seek this out.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/22/2021 at 10:45 PM, HoldenIsHere said:

I watched THE LAST PICTURE SHOW myself recently

On this viewing the moment that really tugged at my heart was the one after the literal last picture show  when Miss Mosey (who had inherited the town’s movie theater when Sam the Lion died) talks to Sonny (Timothy Bottoms) and Duane (Jeff Bridges) as they are leaving the theater after the final screening. She tells them that Sam probably could have kept the theater going but that she “didn’t have the know-how.” The sadness in her voice and on her face when she speaks those words! Miss Mosey was played by Jessie Lee Fulton who appeared in only a few other movies (one of which was Bogdanovich’s PAPER MOON).

 

nGrrFLZ.png

YES!

That scene also moved me greatly, MISS MOSEY had tried her best and failed and BRIDGES and BOTTOMS didn't see her heart breaking right in front of them- the insensitive lunk-heads.

I will add that the recent decline of movie theaters weighed on my mind as I watched THE LAST PICTURE SHOW.

There is no way to explain what a joy it was to go the movies in the 80's and 90's to someone who came of age in the 21st century.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/22/2021 at 5:11 PM, CinemaInternational said:

Remembered this the other day after hearing that The Black Cauldron was getting a Blu-Ray release. Still makes me laugh.

MY NIECE still refers to apples as "CRUNCHY-MUNCHIES."

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

PS- if there ever was a job opening for an actor to play THE HORNED KING and wander around DISNEYWORLD interacting with the guests, I WOULD MOVE TO FLORIDA THAT DAY AND BEG FOR IT.

PSS- The park in JAPAN probably has one.

R52559e1bd1356f29203a8258e405b2a0?rik=Nq

  • Haha 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

PS- if there ever was a job opening for an actor to play THE HORNED KING and wander around DISNEYWORLD interacting with the guests, I WOULD MOVE TO FLORIDA THAT DAY AND BEG FOR IT.

PSS- The park in JAPAN probably has one.

R52559e1bd1356f29203a8258e405b2a0?rik=Nq

There's really no presence at the parks from The Black Cauldron these days.  There might be some oblique reference to it in one of their Halloween parties (like a stage show, or fireworks show).

There was a walk through attraction in Tokyo Disneyland that featured an animatronic Horned King.  It closed back in 2006.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

There is no way to explain what a joy it was to go the movies in the 80's and 90's to someone who came of age in the 21st century.

The neighborhood theaters were practically daycare for me. The Waldo and The Brookside. Most weekends and many times each summer break I'd get dropped off at the first show and picked at dinner time. Never forget seeing A Hard Days Night at the Waldo. Place was sold out and you couldn't hear a thing because the girls screamed nonstop. 

Later, living in West Hollywood we thought nothing of going to Mann's Chinese or the Cinerama Dome. *sigh*

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

There's really no presence at the parks from The Black Cauldron these days.  There might be some oblique reference to it in one of their Halloween parties (like a stage show, or fireworks show).

There USED to be the "Gurgi's Munchies & Crunchies" takeaway snack stand, across from where the Dumbo ride used to be (and Snow White is  now).

http://destdisney.blogspot.com/2009/10/gurgis-munchies-and-crunchies-1990.html

It's had...several name changes since.  😅

There is no way to explain what a joy it was to go the movies in the 80's and 90's to someone who came of age in the 21st century.

You could WALK to theaters, because they were downtown.  (That's because they were small enough, with only 1-3 screens, to fit in a few downtown storefront spaces.)  
Hence, you went as many times as possible, on any night of the week...Ever hear of a "Record-breaking box-office Wednesday"??

Even if you didn't have one downtown, you had a small 3-screen at the strip-mall next to the grocery.  You didn't go to see a movie, so much as go to the theater, to see whatever newly opened there on Friday.  (With three screens, there was turnaround every week, if one movie didn't deliver.)  And if it played elsewhere, you sometimes went there.

...Want to do an age check?  Ask someone about going to a theater, and one sip every time they use the word "Cellphone".  That's how you can peg a cineplex-raised Millennial.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The other night I watched GOOD SAM '48 starring Gary Cooper as Sam and Ann Sheridan as his wife Lucille. This seems to be Leo McCarey's pet project, as he wrote, produced & directed it.

Sam, an exaggerated do-good-er is always loaning money & possessions to those in need while his own family suffers without. Lu tries being patient because she truly loves him, but is often exasperated. She consults the gentle local priest played by (formerly dastardly) Ray Collins who supports her while pointing out Sam's strengths. Lu manages to laugh a few things off, but.... everything culminates with the forever guest brother (note- who keeps the couple in separate bedrooms) and one of Sam's employees failed suicide, neighbor smashing their borrowed car, non payment of personal loans, a thief steals charity money, etc.

And suddenly, this turns into a Wonderful Life wannabe. Sam, afraid to go home, even ends up in a saloon drinking to escape the snow & Lu's disappointment. Everyone in town realizes what a selfless humanitarian Sam has been and all is well when his boss promotes him & the bank gives him a loan to cover the stolen money.

I found this incredibly confusing. There were several comedic moments that made me LOL, lightening the often grim tone of the movie. There were also a few moments that made me actually cry, both extremes incited by Ann Sheridan's charactor, since we can relate to her frustrations. Who loans their car for a weekend trip to the neighbor who's as blind as a bat? Gary Cooper was too seemingly stupid & emotionally distant for me to warm up to this charactor, although I felt the dialogue was well written.

A real misfire. But it was great to see lovely Ann Sheridan in a different kind of role than her young whippersnapper WB roles. While not bad, the most interesting aspect is comparing this to IAWL to see what actually works in a movie & what does not translate well to the viewer.

Good_Sam_FilmPoster.jpeg

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing in particular, but I have recently taken advantage of all the FREE stuff available through my smart TV.   Watching a lot of stuff on Tubi and IMDb, which get me to Shout, Blue Moon, FilmRise and other "providers."  My various "watchlists" have a few years of movies and TV series to watch.

Also have HBO Max as I subscribe to HBO on Spectrum.  Noticed that it has a "hub" for TCM.  But only about 10% are the Classic TCM type movies.  The others are newer.  Logo says these are movies "curated" by TCM, whatever that means.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to recommend the four-part PBS series My Grandparents' War, also available on other media. Four British stars--Helena Bonham Carter, Mark Rylance, Kristin Scott Thomas, and Carey Mulligan--investigate the effect that WWII had on their grandparents. We've only seen the astonishing first episode, with Helena Bonham Carter learning that her grandmother, Lady Violet Bonham Carter, a Member of Parliament, had saved a Czech family from the Nazis and that her maternal grandfather, a Spanish diplomat, had saved hundreds of Jews by illegally issuing travel visas allowing people to cross Spain to Portugal after France had fallen to the Nazis. She meets two people who exist only because one of her grandparents saved their grandparents from the Nazis. Nicely photographed, brilliantly edited. Highly recommended.

We are also enjoying the ongoing PBS series Atlantic Crossing, about the fall of Norway in WWII and the flight of the Crown Princess to America.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kingrat said:

I'd like to recommend the four-part PBS series My Grandparents' War, also available on other media. Four British stars--Helena Bonham Carter, Mark Rylance, Kristin Scott Thomas, and Carey Mulligan--investigate the effect that WWII had on their grandparents. We've only seen the astonishing first episode, with Helena Bonham Carter learning that her grandmother, Lady Violet Bonham Carter, a Member of Parliament, had saved a Czech family from the Nazis and that her maternal grandfather, a Spanish diplomat, had saved hundreds of Jews by illegally issuing travel visas allowing people to cross Spain to Portugal after France had fallen to the Nazis. She meets two people who exist only because one of her grandparents saved their grandparents from the Nazis. Nicely photographed, brilliantly edited. Highly recommended.

We are also enjoying the ongoing PBS series Atlantic Crossing, about the fall of Norway in WWII and the flight of the Crown Princess to America.

I've seen two of the episodes.  With Ms. Carter's Spanish grandfather, it struck me that he was living a real-life Casablanca by issuing those visas.  His diplomatic career suffered as a result because he was disobeying orders from above.  He managed to issue some 30,000 visas, and from what I could tell from the program, they were all hand-written.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eduardo_Propper_de_Callejón

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead (1990)

 

Two characters with no story of their own and unsure of their identities are summoned by the king and queen and tasked with finding the cause of the affliction of young Hamlet.

Gary Oldman and Tim Roth are the title characters but it is not clear at all times which is which. Richard Dreyfuss is the leader of a troupe of actors and is the irreverent and slightly irrational voice of reason. 

This movie is a play which is a play of words and on words. It is absurdly existential and existentially absurd. It twines in and out of a larger play which the characters do not know exists. 

I love this movie so much that I watch it again about once a year.

8/9.2

It is available on several streaming services.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone who doesn't like this movie is in for it. This movie is like garlic. If you don't like garlic, people ("everyone") will think something is wrong with you. It's just not cool to dislike garlic. Ask someone if they like garlic, they don't just say yes, they gush all over the place. I won't judge the movie because I've never been able to get through it. They don't who they are? Absurdly existential and existentially absurd? Sounds like a good one, all right. Can it be more post-modern gibberish?

Link to post
Share on other sites

"I hold that there is no such antick fellow as your bombastical hero who doth so earnestly spout forth his folly as to make his hearers believe that he is unconscious of all incongruity". - Rosencrantz and Guildenstern - W. S. Gilbert - 1874

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...