Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

Long Day's Journey Into Night Poster

Long Day's Journey Into Night (1962) VHS Tape 8/10

An early 20th century family deals with addictions and illness.

After viewing The Iceman Cometh a few days ago, I was on a Eugene O'Neill kick so I pulled out my old VHS of this one. Katherine Hepburn gives one of her best performances as the drug addicted matriarch. Also excellent are Ralph Richardson as her miserly actor husband, Jason Robards as the alcoholic older son and Dean Stockwell as the younger son seriously ill with TB. Many great scenes of confrontation between this dysfunctional bunch, and it quietly concludes.

I just want to mention this was the full near 3 hour version. I had taped it years ago on TCM, it even has Robert Osbourne's intro and outro. My VCR has been giving me trouble recently and I have not used it in months. However I put it in and it played perfectly and it even rewound all the way to the end. I was glad because I was afraid the tape would get ruined like a few other ones I have tried to watch. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Long Day's Journey Into Night Poster

Long Day's Journey Into Night (1962) VHS Tape 8/10

An early 20th century family deals with addictions and illness.

After viewing The Iceman Cometh a few days ago, I was on a Eugene O'Neill kick so I pulled out my old VHS of this one. Katherine Hepburn gives one of her best performances as the drug addicted matriarch. Also excellent are Ralph Richardson as her miserly actor husband, Jason Robards as the alcoholic older son and Dean Stockwell as the younger son seriously ill with TB. Many great scenes of confrontation between this dysfunctional bunch, and it quietly concludes.

I just want to mention this was the full near 3 hour version. I had taped it years ago on TCM, it even has Robert Osbourne's intro and outro. My VCR has been giving me trouble recently and I have not used it in months. However I put it in and it played perfectly and it even rewound all the way to the end. I was glad because I was afraid the tape would get ruined like a few other ones I have tried to watch. 

Fredric March originated the role of James Tyrone on Broadway (1956-58),  His wife Florence Eldridge played Mary Tyrone. Jason Robards, Jr. played James, Jr., the older son. Bradford Dillman was the younger son. The play and March won Tony Awards.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/2/2021 at 9:59 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I bet ALAN RICKMAN made ONE HELL of a VALMONT.

You must watch him in: The Song of Lunch (2010). 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/1/2021 at 3:45 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

See the source image

Glenn kept her costumes? Where did she plan to wear them? LOL.

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Glenn kept her costumes? Where did she plan to wear them? LOL.

Maybe she was planning to start a museum, like Debbie Reynolds...

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Hibi said:

Glenn kept her costumes? Where did she plan to wear them? LOL.

Perhaps she foresaw the need. You must admit it is perfect for social distancing.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, SansFin said:

Perhaps she foresaw the need. You must admit it is perfect for social distancing.

I hope she breaks one out for her next Oscars. 

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/2/2021 at 1:23 PM, CinemaInternational said:

He ended up making his film debut in Die Hard

One hell of a debut, that.  "He will not be joining us for the rest of his life."

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

One Body Too Many (1944)

 

A life insurance agent is primed for the largest sale of his career when he keeps an appointment with a millionaire. He finds the millionaire has died and the house is full of his heirs who will lose their share of the estate if they leave or die before the funeral.

I feel that: Jack Haley is one of those love-him-or-hate-him actors. He is not quite as antic here as he is in some of his movies. I believe this is the only movie he made with: Jean Parker and it is perhaps for the best as I felt little chemistry between them. Bela Lugosi is outstanding as a slightly sinister butler!

This is a very good movie of its type. 

7.1/11.4

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I just watched HANGMEN ALSO DIE '43 mostly because I love Fritz Lang movies and I like Brian Donlevy and wanted to see him in a leading role.  Well it took me 2 nights to watch this, it's long & detailed. It's loosely based on the assassination of the #2 man of the Nazi SS in Prague. Gestapo has a handful of witnesses on the street and starts pressuring them for answers. Donlevy involves these citizens to lie & protect him from being caught. All of these people are pursued & pressured into telling what they know, often with cruel consequences. It's a study in strength & patriotism. A patriotism so clear, strong & dangerous, I'm ashamed at what passes for "patriotism" these days.

The story was exhausting, only made tolerable by cameraman James Wong Howe-WOW-just incredible photography in this one. I enjoyed Brian Donlevy in this, but noticed he either has a weird physique or maybe his costuming made him look like he had tiny arms, like MST's Tom Servo. The principle assistant for his cover up Mascha was deftly played by Anna Lee. Her role was a difficult one because she had to play "clueless" then faking cluelessness for the other charactors, once she really understood what was going on, done very well. Gene Lockhart gets to shine too, playing a weaselly "double agent" charactor, something we rarely see from him.

While watching this I couldn't help thinking, "Really? Was the Gestapo really that unfair? Brutal?" Then I thought about who MADE this film, Fritz Lang was there, he actually saw all of this happen in his homeland. Knowing that made this movie seem real and all the more chilling. Even if you can separate yourself from realizing this, it's a pretty exciting noir as far as movies go. 

220px-Hangmen_Also_Die_1943_poster.jpg

Once this was over I needed something cartoonish to lighten my mood, so I followed this with perennial favorite MUNSTER GO HOME '66

220px-Munsters_Move_Munster_Go_Home_1966.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfaithful (2002) With Richard Gere and Diane Lane.The latter is spectacular as a woman who commits adultery. Such a common theme but Lane makes it fresh, the wonder, the joy, the disbelief that it's actually happening. the anticipation of the next meeting, the joy and the apprehension in opposition, all done with facial expressions and gesture. There are skillfully made montages What we see is a down-to-earth experience of a woman who is doing something that she probably did not think she could ever do. Here is a comparison. Few of us would probably put out a contract on another's life. In CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS, Martin Landau is the idea of an Everyman who actually is talked into doing just that, but it is not an easy sell and it is accomplished through the emotional base of a regular person, not a person whose world might contain such possibilities. Diane Lane's character emanates from this same day-to-day emotional base and is marvelous throughout in Unfaithful. And no question she was aided by some brilliant directing.

Richard Gere is not as successful, at least from my point of view. About half way through the film he is finally asked to do something in the film and I was immediately struck that this movie is a remake of The Unfaithful Wife (1969). A French movie which is a fave for me. Directed by Claude Chabrol, with Michel Bouquet and Stephan Audran. Suddenly the rest of the story flashes through my mind and knowing what he was going to do, Gere's performance might have been ruined for me. He looked liked he was simply acting and not being. I'll settle for miscasting and not bad acting (although this is a role he might be expected to do.)

The ending of the French version is reserved and nuanced. The American version is not.

 

Unfaithful Poster              The Unfaithful Wife Poster

2002                                                              1969

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been on a Charles Boyer kick lately...

Hold Back the Dawn (1941)

I've had this film on my DVR for about three years. It's been so long that when Ben Mankiewicz mentioned that Charles Boyer was TCM's Star of the Month, I had to find out when that was! Apparently Boyer was TCM's Star of the Month in January 2018--so that is when I recorded this film. 

But better late than never, right? Or as Blanche Devereaux would say, better late than...pregnant! Which is also true. 

May contain spoilers... 

Anyway, I digress.

In this film, Boyer plays Romanian immigrant, Georges Iscovescu, who is currently residing in a Mexican border town. Georges hopes to immigrate to the United States but is informed that he won't be able to immigrate for 5-8 years due to the United States quota system. He runs into his former dancing partner, Anita Dixon (Paulette Goddard), an Australian (just take the movie's word for it. Goddard does not attempt any type of accent). Anita informs Georges that she is now a United States citizen, because she married (and divorced) an American. In addition to deceiving men so that she could attain citizenship, it is also established that Anita is a golddigger. Georges isn't quite as bad as Anita, but he is intrigued by the route she took to gain quick American citizenship. Georges decides that he's going to find an American woman to marry.

In drives Olivia de Havilland, literally, who plays Emmy Brown, an American school teacher. Emmy has taken her class of 15 young boys to Mexico on a day trip. It is established that Emmy is from Azusa, CA, a small town near Los Angeles. Georges decides that Emmy is perfect for his scheme. When her "bus" breaks down (it's actually a large station wagon) and she has to take her vehicle into a local repair shop, Georges further sabotages the repairs by casually kicking away a needed part. This forces Emmy and her students into having to spend the night in a hotel lobby. Emmy's prolonged trip to Mexico provides Georges with an opportunity to woo and marry Emmy. And unbelievably, he succeeds! Emmy and Georges, despite having only known one another for a few hours, marry. 

Now Georges puts the next part of his plan into motion. Georges cannot immediately travel to the US with Emmy. Apparently non-citizens who marry Americans have to wait for 4 weeks before they can enter the country. Emmy is forced to return to California on her own. Georges then carries on life in Mexico as if nothing happened, eagerly making plans with Anita as to what they will do when they're both in the United States together.  However, Emmy shows up about a week later, throwing a wrench into Georges' plans. At the same time, United States immigration detective, Hammock, shows up looking for con artists such as Georges and Anita, who try to rope un-suspecting Americans into marrying them. Wanting to make a quick getaway, Georges convinces Emmy to go away with him on a honeymoon of sorts. They end up driving all night, through a torrential rainstorm, until finally arriving at a small Mexican village.

During their trip, Georges and Emmy partake in a few traditional newlywed ceremonies and activities and have fun. Georges begins to see Emmy in a new light, and actually starts enjoying her company and falling in love with her. There's a scene where it's obvious that Emmy wants to consummate their relationship, and Georges is reluctant to get so involved with her. He even goes as far as to feign a shoulder injury. However, Emmy's charm and radiant personality wins him over and by the end of the trip he's head over heels for her.

Will Georges follow through with his immigration plan and run off with Anita? What happens to Emmy? 

This film hit all the right buttons for what I love in a true, legitimate romantic film. There were no contrivances. No schmaltz. I believed Boyer and de Havilland's relationship the entire time.  Even the happy ending, didn't seem tacked on.  It was perfect.  This was the last film that Billy Wilder co-wrote (with Charles Brackett) prior to starting his directing career and it was fantastic. The opening and closing sequences, which framed the entire film as a story idea pitched to Director Saxon (played by the movie's director, Mitchell Leisen) by Georges. That in and of itself could be cheesy, but Wilder and Brackett's fantastic screenplay makes these scenes work. 

This was a fantastic film that I look forward to adding to my collection. I think I'm also turning into a Charles Boyer fan.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

More Boyer!

Gaslight (1944)

I know this film is old hat to many here, but it was the first time that I really watched it.   Oftentimes, it was on in the background and while I watched it, I didn't really WATCH it. This film's title is the namesake for a form of psychological abuse where the victim is manipulated by another into thinking that they're losing their mind. 

In "Gaslight," Ingrid Bergman plays a young woman, Paula, who as a child interrupted her Aunt (and guardian)'s murderer looking for some priceless jewels. Paula's Aunt, Alice Alquist, was a world famous opera singer who was also known to have these jewels in her possession. An unknown assailant murdered Alice in an attempt to abscond with the jewels, but ultimately was unsuccessful due to Paula.  Flash forward ten years. The adult Paula is trying to become an opera singer like her famous Aunt. She's also in love with her pianist, Gregory Anton (Charles Boyer), who she has only known for a short time (2 weeks!). After a whirlwind romance, the two marry and honeymoon at Lake Como in Italy. Gregory reveals to Paula that he's always dreamt of living in "a square" in London. Paula, completely enamored of Gregory, reveals that she inherited her Aunt's London townhouse #9 on Thornton Square, and agrees to let Gregory live out his dream and the two move in.

After returning to the townhouse for the first time since her Aunt's murder, Paula is overcome by all the memories she had with her Aunt. Gregory, seemingly wanting to help put Paula at ease, suggests that they put all of her Aunt's belongings up in the Attic and buy new furniture so that they can start with a clean slate. Before moving the items up into the Attic, Paula discovers a letter written to her Aunt two days before her death. The sender of the letter is revealed to be "Sergis Bauer." Gregory has a vitriolic reaction, scaring Paula. He says that reacted that way because he was so upset at Paula finding such an emotionally-charged reminder of her Aunt's death. Paula lets it pass and agrees to move her Aunt's possessions into the attic.  Gregory also hires a new maid, Nancy (Angela Lansbury), to help Paula. However, Nancy ends up being just as much an antagonist as Gregory. Nancy is overt about her sexuality and she and Gregory openly flirt with one another. She also notices the emotional abuse inflicted upon Paula (by Gregory) and follows along, hereby making her complicit in Gregory's emotional abuse of Paula. Nancy wants more than to just be a chambermaid, and Gregory might just be her ticket to high society. She's also quite the tart, which makes her fun to watch.

Throughout the film, Gregory casually (in the sense that Paula doesn't interpret it as such) but overtly manipulates Paula into believing that she is mentally ill and losing her mind.  He convinces her of her forgetfulness and knack for losing things.  Paula begins hearing footsteps when the house is supposed to be empty and observes the flame of the gaslight going down, as if someone else is using the gas elsewhere in the house.  Gregory starts out small, but slowly turns Paula into a nervous mess.  He keeps her sheltered, away from the prying eyes of nosy neighbors like Miss Whaites (Dame May Whitty).  A chance encounter with Scotland Yard Inspector Brian Cameron (Joseph Cotten) causes Paula's Aunt's cold case to be reopened.  Paula bears a striking resemblance to her Aunt and Brian was a fan of hers as a child. There is something "off" with Gregory and Paula and Brian is determined to figure out what it is. 

This is a fantastic film. I don't know why I didn't intently watch it earlier. Boyer is so delightfully creepy and evil in this film. It's easy to see how a young woman like Paula would be smitten and taken with him. Boyer's voice and accent and seemingly romantic gestures would make any woman swoon--especially a sheltered, somewhat naive woman like Paula. Ingrid Bergman's portrayal of a woman slowly being driven mad is fascinating and she deserved her Oscar. You feel for this poor woman who seemingly has to accept that she's losing her mind, but you know deep down, she's trying to rationalize everything. She's not losing her mind. But everyone around her (Gregory and Nancy) convince her that she is.

Angela Lansbury is amazing in this film and it's hard to believe that she was only seventeen when she started filming this movie. Joseph Cotten is always a welcome addition to any film.

"Gaslight" has such a fun, gloomy atmosphere. It is suspenseful and delightfully creepy. Even the opening credits feature a gaslight flickering in front of a shadow of a man strangling a woman.

This film comes highly recommended to anyone who enjoys psychological thrillers and/or the two leads: Charles Boyer and Ingrid Bergman.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Can anyone tell me if (and how) the Forum allows the users to black out spoilers, but the reader can click on the blacked out portion to read the spoiler if they so desire?

Lorna, I think I've seen you black out spoilers... Can you help me please?

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Can anyone tell me if (and how) the Forum allows the users to black out spoilers, but the reader can click on the blacked out portion to read the spoiler if they so desire?

Lorna, I think I've seen you black out spoilers... Can you help me please?

YOU CAN'T DO IT ANYMORE, IT SUCKS.

SORRY.

  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

I've been on a Charles Boyer kick lately...

I've had this film on my DVR for about three years. It's been so long that when Ben Mankiewicz mentioned that Charles Boyer was TCM's Star of the Month, I had to find out when that was! Apparently Boyer was TCM's Star of the Month in January 2018--so that is when I recorded this film. 

But better late than never, right? Or as Blanche Devereaux would say, better late than...pregnant! Which is also true. 

May contain spoilers until I figure out how to black out the spoiler.

Anyway, I digress.

In this film, Boyer plays Romanian immigrant, Georges Iscovescu, who is currently residing in a Mexican border town. Georges hopes to immigrate to the United States but is informed that he won't be able to immigrate for 5-8 years due to the United States quota system. He runs into his former dancing partner, Anita Dixon (Paulette Goddard), an Australian (just take the movie's word for it. Goddard does not attempt any type of accent). Anita informs Georges that she is now a United States citizen, because she married (and divorced) an American. In addition to deceiving men so that she could attain citizenship, it is also established that Anita is a golddigger. Georges isn't quite as bad as Anita, but he is intrigued by the route she took to gain quick American citizenship. Georges decides that he's going to find an American woman to marry.

In drives Olivia de Havilland, literally, who plays Emmy Brown, an American school teacher. Emmy has taken her class of 15 young boys to Mexico on a day trip. It is established that Emmy is from Azusa, CA, a small town near Los Angeles. Georges decides that Emmy is perfect for his scheme. When her "bus" breaks down (it's actually a large station wagon) and she has to take her vehicle into a local repair shop, Georges further sabotages the repairs by casually kicking away a needed part. This forces Emmy and her students into having to spend the night in a hotel lobby. Emmy's prolonged trip to Mexico provides Georges with an opportunity to woo and marry Emmy. And unbelievably, he succeeds! Emmy and Georges, despite having only known one another for a few hours, marry. 

Now Georges puts the next part of his plan into motion. Georges cannot immediately travel to the US with Emmy. Apparently non-citizens who marry Americans have to wait for 4 weeks before they can enter the country. Emmy is forced to return to California on her own. Georges then carries on life in Mexico as if nothing happened, eagerly making plans with Anita as to what they will do when they're both in the United States together.  However, Emmy shows up about a week later, throwing a wrench into Georges' plans. At the same time, United States immigration detective, Hammock, shows up looking for con artists such as Georges and Anita, who try to rope un-suspecting Americans into marrying them. Wanting to make a quick getaway, Georges convinces Emmy to go away with him on a honeymoon of sorts. They end up driving all night, through a torrential rainstorm, until finally arriving at a small Mexican village.

During their trip, Georges and Emmy partake in a few traditional newlywed ceremonies and activities and have fun. Georges begins to see Emmy in a new light, and actually starts enjoying her company and falling in love with her. There's a scene where it's obvious that Emmy wants to consummate their relationship, and Georges is reluctant to get so involved with her. He even goes as far as to feign a shoulder injury. However, Emmy's charm and radiant personality wins him over and by the end of the trip he's head over heels for her.

Will Georges follow through with his immigration plan and run off with Anita? What happens to Emmy? 

This film hit all the right buttons for what I love in a true, legitimate romantic film. There were no contrivances. No schmaltz. I believed Boyer and de Havilland's relationship the entire time.  Even the happy ending, didn't seem tacked on.  It was perfect.  This was the last film that Billy Wilder co-wrote (with Charles Brackett) prior to starting his directing career and it was fantastic. The opening and closing sequences, which framed the entire film as a story idea pitched to Director Saxon (played by the movie's director, Mitchell Leisen) by Georges. That in and of itself could be cheesy, but Wilder and Brackett's fantastic screenplay makes these scenes work. 

This was a fantastic film that I look forward to adding to my collection. I think I'm also turning into a Charles Boyer fan.

Is this a game in which we are to guess the name of the movie? 😉

Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, SansFin said:

Is this a game in which we are to guess the name of the movie? 😉

Oops! 

It's Hold Back the Dawn.  I'll edit my post.  Thanks!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

Can anyone tell me if (and how) the Forum allows the users to black out spoilers, but the reader can click on the blacked out portion to read the spoiler if they so desire?

Lorna, I think I've seen you black out spoilers... Can you help me please?

Putting text in light yellow or gray (or any light color you choose) might be an option, to wit:

It is the sled.

It's hard to read but all you have to do to hold down the left click and run the cursor across the text. You could cite the spoiler and explain how to read in case the reader does not know.

////

 

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, laffite said:

Putting text in light yellow or gray (or any light color you choose) might be an option, to wit:

It's hard to read but all you have to do to hold down the left click and run the cursor across the text. You could cite the spoiler and explain how to read in case the reader does not know.

And if you put it in white, it's impossible to read, but possible to see if you mouse-highlight the paragraph.  Llll-likezo:

The FBI "agent" was  part of the sting, and really one of Gondorff's pals, after all.

Of course, you have to put a SPOILER warning ahead of time, to note that there's something actually in that white space to read.

Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, laffite said:

Putting text in light yellow or gray (or any light color you choose) might be an option, to wit:

It is the sled.

It's hard to read but all you have to do to hold down the left click and run the cursor across the text. You could cite the spoiler and explain how to read in case the reader does not know.

////

Thanks! That's a good idea.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, laffite said:

Unfaithful (2002) With Richard Gere and Diane Lane.The latter is spectacular as a woman who commits adultery. Such a common theme but Lane makes it fresh, the wonder, the joy, the disbelief that it's actually happening. the anticipation of the next meeting, the joy and the apprehension in opposition, all done with facial expressions and gesture. There are skillfully made montages What we see is a down-to-earth experience of a woman who is doing something that she probably did not think she could ever do. Here is a comparison. Few of us would probably put out a contract on another's life. In CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS, Martin Landau is the idea of an Everyman who actually is talked into doing just that, but it is not an easy sell and it is accomplished through the emotional base of a regular person, not a person whose world might contain such possibilities. Diane Lane's character emanates from this same day-to-day emotional base and is marvelous throughout in Unfaithful. And no question she was aided by some brilliant directing.

Richard Gere is not as successful, at least from my point of view. About half way through the film he is finally asked to do something in the film and I was immediately struck that this movie is a remake of The Unfaithful Wife (1969). A French movie which is a fave for me. Directed by Claude Chabrol, with Michel Bouquet and Stephan Audran. Suddenly the rest of the story flashes through my mind and knowing what he was going to do, Gere's performance might have been ruined for me. He looked liked he was simply acting and not being. I'll settle for miscasting and not bad acting (although this is a role he might be expected to do.)

The ending of the French version is reserved and nuanced. The American version is not.

 

Unfaithful Poster              The Unfaithful Wife Poster

2002                                                              1969

 

I would argue though that unfaithful was a better, more subtle film than the director's earlier perils of adultry tale Fatal Attraction, which was partially undone by the tacked on ending.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For the past month I have been on a TV episode kick (the perils of getting addicted to watching Desperate Housewives on Hulu...... :unsure:), but I managed this week to swing by TCM to watch both Shag (fun, sweet, good atmosphere and performances)  and Madeleine (a bit slow, but beautifully photograhed, sharp, with a nicely enigmatic ending)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I streamed Oklahoma! last night.  It was the restored Todd-AO version that premiered at the TCM Film Festival a few years back.  Although I was at that festival, I didn't have the pass level that gets you into the opening night film at the TCL Chinese Theatre.

Although I love the music from the show, I've only been lukewarm to the movie in the viewings I've had of it, and I've never cared for the "let's hurry up and end the show ending," both on the stage and screen, or the crazy accents employed. 

I've only seen the 35mm Cinemascope version before.  But seeing this restored Todd-AO version was like an entirely different film (and it really is, given that they shot each scene twice).   The performances seem fresher, and the colors and cinematography really popped in this restoration version, especially in the outdoor scenes.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

I streamed Oklahoma! last night.  It was the restored Todd-AO version that premiered at the TCM Film Festival a few years back.  Although I was at that festival, I didn't have the pass level that gets you into the opening night film at the TCL Chinese Theatre.

Although I love the music from the show, I've only been lukewarm to the movie in the viewings I've had of it, and I've never cared for the "let's hurry up and end the show ending," both on the stage and screen, or the crazy accents employed. 

I've only seen the 35mm Cinemascope version before.  But seeing this restored Todd-AO version was like an entirely different film (and it really is, given that they shot each scene twice).   The performances seem fresher, and the colors and cinematography really popped in this restoration version, especially in the outdoor scenes.

Leonard Maltin included the opening of Oklahoma! in Todd-AO in a presentation he did at the festival about big screen formats, and people gasped at the power of it.

 

2 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

For the past month I have been on a TV episode kick (the perils of getting addicted to watching Desperate Housewives on Hulu...... :unsure:), but I managed this week to swing by TCM to watch both Shag (fun, sweet, good atmosphere and performances)  and Madeleine (a bit slow, but beautifully photograhed, sharp, with a nicely enigmatic ending)

I'm glad you liked Madeleine, a film which for me really improved on second viewing. It's based on a real Victorian case, which ended as in the film. Lean does so much with camera positions where Madeleine is looking up: out her window and up at her lover; the scene at the ball with a balcony; and the stunning shot as as she looks up the stairway to enter the courtroom. Ann Todd is perfectly cast.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...