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3 hours ago, EricJ said:

And if you put it in white, it's impossible to read, but possible to see if you mouse-highlight the paragraph.  Llll-likezo:

The FBI "agent" was  part of the sting, and really one of Gondorff's pals, after all.

Of course, you have to put a SPOILER warning ahead of time, to note that there's something actually in that white space to read.

Yes, I know, I mentioned that in my post that you cited and responded to. Thanks.

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2 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Leonard Maltin included the opening of Oklahoma! in Todd-AO in a presentation he did at the festival about big screen formats, and people gasped at the power of it.

I wish I had seen that.  I usually opt for films over discussions/presentations at the festival.  It's always hard to choose, though.

We've all been conditioned to see films on smaller screens, either at home, or at the multiplex.  I'm not much into comic book movies, so I typically don't see entertainment films in IMAX.  I would like to see it on a curved screen as originally intended, but sadly there are very few of those around these days.  Hopefully the Cinerama Dome will be saved.

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The Body Vanished (1939)

 

It is a busman's holiday for Scotland Yard Inspector Paine when he goes to a remote village for a little fishing and becomes involved in what would certainly be a murder case if only there was a corpse.

This is a quite serviceable little movie for those who like light-hearted British murder mysteries. There is some chemistry between the Inspector and the woman who was hired to be the victim's secretary just minutes before he was murdered.

7.4/10

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The Living Ghost (1942)

 

An effective but slightly screwy investigator is pulled from retirement to search for a kidnapped millionaire. He is nearly ready to spring into action when the millionaire returns with a portion of his brain paralyzed. 

The title hints at elements of horror but there are none. There are some very good little zingers tossed off throughout. It is a very good example of its genre of the era.

7.6/11

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Posted (edited)

The Men (1950)

SOURCE: Criterion Channel

I saw that this film on the Criterion Channel and wanted to make a point to watch it before it left Criterion. I knew that this was Marlon Brando's film debut. Normally, I'm not a huge fan of Brando's, I don't really consider him to be the end all, be all of acting; however, I do like him in the beginning of his career. He starts to lose me once he hits middle age. And let's face it, Marlon Brando in the 1950s was HOT HOT.  Later... not so much.

Anyway. 

In "The Men," Brando plays Lieutenant Ken "Bud" Wilocek. During the last days of WWII, Bud is shot in the back and paralyzed from the waist down. He then spends the next four years in a  P rivate room in the paraplegic ward at the army hospital. Mired in self-pity, depression, bitterness, etc. Bud is mean and nasty to the nurse and doctor and not showing any progress. Hoping to force Bud to socialize and maybe improve not only his body, but also his mental state, Dr. Brock (Everett Sloane) has Bud moved from his p rivate room to the common room.

In the common room, Bud's bed is placed next to Norm Butler (Jack Webb), Leo Doolin (Richard Erdman), and Angel (Arthur Jurado) all fellow soldiers. Bud continues to be bitter about his situation but after awhile, with the help of his neighbors, he begins to come out of his shell. Angel, especially, is a big help as his positive attitude and determination to make the best of his situation (and leave the hospital), inspires Bud to do the same. Starting with sitting up in bed, Bud begins a workout regimen to work to get stronger.

Meanwhile, Bud's girlfriend, Ellen (Teresa Wright) whom Bud hasn't seen since before his accident is determined to get back together with him. Up until now, Bud has been refusing to allow Ellen to see him; but she's relentless. He finally relents when Ellen makes it clear that his disability doesn't make a difference. They start to go out on dates. Bud is even able to drive with a modified car. However, Bud begins to question whether Ellen is really ready for life with a disabled partner.

This was a really great film. Brando apparently threw himself into the role by living in the paraplegic ward, lying in bed for a month. He also became very skilled in maneuvering with the wheelchair and skillfully rounded tight corners and even played basketball. In some of his films, (if this makes sense) I feel like Brando can seem affected. His performance says "Look at me I am acting" as opposed to seeming genuine. I think that's what turns me off of him. But in this film, and even films like "A Streetcar Named Desire," "The Wild One," and "On the Waterfront," he doesn't give me that vibe. 

At the beginning of the film, we're treated to a seminar/Q&A session about paralysis, and I was concerned that this film would become preachy. Thankfully this scene seemed like it was just setting up the issues that paraplegics face, especially the idea that it's almost certain that they will never walk again. I know that it can happen, but I imagine that it is a minute possibility, not a guarantee. I appreciate that the film did not have a contrived ending, like Brando magically gaining the ability to walk and running down the hall to Teresa Wright or something. An ending like that would have completely undermined the entire point of the film.

I thought this was a great film and thought that Brando did an excellent job.

Edited by speedracer5
The Word "P rivate" is censored!! Seriously?!
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Macabre Poster

Macabre (1958) TCM On Demand 5/10

After the mysterious deaths of his wife and sister in law, a doctor is told his little daughter has been buried alive.

The first of director William Castle's "gimmick" films and this is one of the weakest. Castle's gimmick was to have insurance policies if anyone died of fright while watching it.  Despite the bizarre plot, it is a bit dull. Things start to pick up near the end. The only familiar faces in the cast to me were Jim Backus as the police chief who has a grudge against the doctor, Ellen Corby is a suspicious housekeeper. Castle's pictures would get better after this once he got some bigger stars like Vincent Price and Joan Crawford.
 

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Alfie, both of them were showing back to back on HD Net DirectTV.

I've seen the Jude Law version several times, own it too. Never had seen the Michael Caine version and wanted to see how similar the story lines were. I really enjoyed the earlier version's British scenery and the cultural nuances. I was floored by the grainy photo montage that roll with the credits at the end. That is emulated in the newer version which is equally effective, yet seeing the original and knowing how many years earlier that had been produced makes it much more impressive.

I had no idea Cher sang that original theme song. Having heard the newer soundtrack so many times I've come to like the Dave Stewart (Eurythmics) and Mick Jagger songs very much. 

Alfie is supposed to be a selfish cad, this line from the later version is slightly more powerful than the earlier; "You know, when I look back on my little life, and all the women I've known...I can't help but think about... all that they've done for me... and how little I've done for them." Thing is, both Alfies (or is it Alfi) use the men in their lives too, but I found Michael Caine's Alfie to be downright abusive to women with few redeeming qualities. Jude Law has the boyish good looks and charm to pull off the half-hearted 'I know I hurt you, but I didn't mean to' apology. This contrast becomes more apparent in how the two Alfi deal with children in their lives. 

I know the Jude Law version has lousy reviews but I'll give it 7.5/10 and Michael Caine's 8/10 

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Raffles (1939)

 

A gentleman jewel thief decides to go straight because of the love of a good woman but fate has other plans.

This movie is from the time when they knew how to make great movies. Olivia de Havilland is warm and caring. David Niven is ... well ... he is David Niven. 

To argue whether the Ronald Colman or David Niven versions of the story are superior generally degrades to picking nits. I might have liked to see a pairing of Kay Francis and David Niven but we must settle for what we have.

8.4/10

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8 hours ago, SansFin said:

we must settle for what we have.“

Which is what you tell everyone  when the studio says you’re getting DAVID NIVEN for your picture...WHETHER YOU LIKE IT OR NOT.

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On 5/7/2021 at 4:52 PM, laffite said:

Putting text in light yellow or gray (or any light color you choose) might be an option, to wit:

It is the sled.

It's hard to read but all you have to do to hold down the left click and run the cursor across the text. You could cite the spoiler and explain how to read in case the reader does not know.

////

 

 

WAIT, IT’S THE SLED!!!!!

SERIOUSLY!!!!???

you RUINED IT FOR ME!!!

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On 5/8/2021 at 2:13 PM, Det Jim McLeod said:

Macabre Poster

Macabre (1958) TCM On Demand 5/10

After the mysterious deaths of his wife and sister in law, a doctor is told his little daughter has been buried alive.

The first of director William Castle's "gimmick" films and this is one of the weakest. Castle's gimmick was to have insurance policies if anyone died of fright while watching it.  Despite the bizarre plot, it is a bit dull. Things start to pick up near the end. The only familiar faces in the cast to me were Jim Backus as the police chief who has a grudge against the doctor, Ellen Corby is a suspicious housekeeper. Castle's pictures would get better after this once he got some bigger stars like Vincent Price and Joan Crawford.
 

I haven't seen Macabre in quite a while, but I remember it being kind of lame. I guess my favorites of his horror period are Mr. Sardonicus and The Tingler, but I'd like to see some of Castle's 1940s/early 50s films. Quite a diverse lot. One of his earlier films which I've never seen -- Slaves of Babylon -- features Maurice Schwartz, who founded the Yiddish theater in NYC! He plays the prophet Daniel. It also features Julie Newmar in the role of dancer-assassin.

maurice-schwartz-slaves-of-babylon-1953-

691b990736e4d8c7ec20d98c8a0c1693.jpg

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So This Is Paris (Lubitsch, 1926)

Thank you TCM for finally showing this! The plot (spouses sneaking around behind each others' backs) may owe a lot to Die Fledermaus (which Lubitsch previously adapted in 1917 as The Merry Jail). But the telling and the setting are glorious. The sequence at the Artists' Ball was a special highlight (I'm going to be very disappointed when my favorite bar reopens and everyone prefers to stand around looking at their phones rather than dancing madly). Ben Model's score was a delight--if I can't see this film at AFI Silver with an appreciative audience, this was the next best thing. It's already on HBO MAX, and will be on Watch TCM after the West Coast feed finishes--don't miss it.

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I thought of one way we can get around the deactivation of the [spoiler] function IN THE MESSAGEBOARDS, just post the divulging information IN GERMAN, then whoever is reading the post can copy it and enter it into the google translator, which will then translate into English.

IE:

"Das Küken im "Weinenden Spiel" ist wirklich ein Typ."

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14 hours ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

So This Is Paris (Lubitsch, 1926)

Thank you TCM for finally showing this! The plot (spouses sneaking around behind each others' backs) may owe a lot to Die Fledermaus (which Lubitsch previously adapted in 1917 as The Merry Jail). But the telling and the setting are glorious. The sequence at the Artists' Ball was a special highlight (I'm going to be very disappointed when my favorite bar reopens and everyone prefers to stand around looking at their phones rather than dancing madly). Ben Model's score was a delight--if I can't see this film at AFI Silver with an appreciative audience, this was the next best thing. It's already on HBO MAX, and will be on Watch TCM after the West Coast feed finishes--don't miss it.

I'm so glad you enjoyed the film, and thanks for your kind words about the score! The TCM blog posted a very nice article/interview about it, written by Susan King, which you can read here.

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I thought of one way we can get around the deactivation of the [spoiler] function IN THE MESSAGEBOARDS, just post the divulging information IN GERMAN, then whoever is reading the post can copy it and enter it into the google translator, which will then translate into English.

IE:

"Das Küken im "Weinenden Spiel" ist wirklich ein Typ."

What of those of us who read German? I am passable only with it so I would possibly not see the meaning of complex phrases on first sight but my little fuzzy has used it much for the last year and would automatically know what it says.

Do any here read Spanish? Mi aerodeslizador está lleno de anguilas

Is Japanese instantly recognizable by many? 私のホバークラフトは鰻でいっぱいです 

Perhaps Norwegian?  Luftputefartøyet mitt er fullt av ål

A problem which I foresee is that choosing a language with which most people are unfamiliar and so would not instantly recognize is that Google Translate is limited to the most-used languages and so will not translate Lakota Sioux, Kalmyk or even Klingon! 😞

 

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4 minutes ago, SansFin said:

What of those of us who read German? I am passable only with it so I would possibly not see the meaning of complex phrases on first sight but my little fuzzy has used it much for the last year and would automatically know what it says.

Do any here read Spanish? Mi aerodeslizador está lleno de anguilas

Is Japanese instantly recognizable by many? 私のホバークラフトは鰻でいっぱいです 

Perhaps Norwegian?  Luftputefartøyet mitt er fullt av ål

A problem which I foresee is that choosing a language with which most people are unfamiliar and so would not instantly recognize is that Google Translate is limited to the most-used languages and so will not translate Lakota Sioux, Kalmyk or even Klingon! 😞

 

I like KLINGON, we can do KLINGON.

Or ESPERANTO, because it deserves a chance.

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20 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I like KLINGON, we can do KLINGON.

Or ESPERANTO, because it deserves a chance.

I am very sorry to say that this is an example of our further divergence of opinion. I find David Niven to be quite wonderful while it seems that you do not. You seem to feel that Esperanto is somehow worthy of use while I feel very strongly that it is a blight on communication and every reasonable person should dedicate their life to eradicating it totally from human consciousness.

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8 minutes ago, SansFin said:

I am very sorry to say that this is an example of our further divergence of opinion. I find David Niven to be quite wonderful while it seems that you do not. You seem to feel that Esperanto is somehow worthy of use while I feel very strongly that it is a blight on communication and every reasonable person should dedicate their life to eradicating it totally from human consciousness.

I gave NIVEN a harder time that he deserved, he was apparently a very nice man in real life (as an actor though, I find him to be inflexible to a fault, even in roles where he could have shown versatility, like WUTHERING HEIGHTS.)

 

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16 hours ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

So This Is Paris (Lubitsch, 1926)

Thank you TCM for finally showing this! The plot (spouses sneaking around behind each others' backs) may owe a lot to Die Fledermaus (which Lubitsch previously adapted in 1917 as The Merry Jail). But the telling and the setting are glorious. The sequence at the Artists' Ball was a special highlight (I'm going to be very disappointed when my favorite bar reopens and everyone prefers to stand around looking at their phones rather than dancing madly). Ben Model's score was a delight--if I can't see this film at AFI Silver with an appreciative audience, this was the next best thing. It's already on HBO MAX, and will be on Watch TCM after the West Coast feed finishes--don't miss it.

Looking forward to watching this (recorded it).

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I thought of one way we can get around the deactivation of the [spoiler] function IN THE MESSAGEBOARDS, just post the divulging information IN GERMAN, then whoever is reading the post can copy it and enter it into the google translator, which will then translate into English.

IE:

"Das Küken im "Weinenden Spiel" ist wirklich ein Typ."

Es ist der Schlitten

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Did anyone else see the documentary on Mike Nichols and Elaine May? It had been shown on the American Masters series on PBS. The attempt to locate Nichols and May within the context of the 1950s was superficial, to say the least. Several of their best-known skits are shown. Though I can appreciate their talent and their work, and their influence on other comics is obvious, I didn't particularly enjoy the sketches or laugh much.

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

Did anyone else see the documentary on Mike Nichols and Elaine May? It had been shown on the American Masters series on PBS. The attempt to locate Nichols and May within the context of the 1950s was superficial, to say the least. Several of their best-known skits are shown. Though I can appreciate their talent and their work, and their influence on other comics is obvious, I didn't particularly enjoy the sketches or laugh much.

Enjoyed it. I learned stuff! Wasn’t familiar with them or their involvement with Second City. 

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Hatari! (1962)

 

A team which captures African animals for zoos has a variety of problems as well as having to deal with the wildlife.

I am not a fan of John Wayne. I will not risk wagering "loser must watch a John Wayne movie" even when I am sure to win the bet. This is one of the three movies in which I find him great. He is a basic guy working hard and taking risks and hoping that is all the world asks of him. That is his 'real life' persona and he portrays it well. Red Buttons is wonderful and as cute as a ... cute thing. Elsa Martinelli is at her svelte best. The animals make up the majority of the cast and their actions and reactions are captivating to watch.

The IMDb.com reviews reek with calls of animal abuse. It is true that techniques of capture were primitive but the very nature of the business was to provide healthy and unharmed animals as no zoo wished to display cripples. They did the best they could with what they had and were not unnecessarily cruel. There are no knives nor clubs. There is no blood or gore except on humans as a result of accidents.

John Wayne was twice the age of Elsa Martinelli. He looked as if he had been rode hard and put up wet while she looked as if she had just stepped out of a convent school. I usually overlook such discrepancies but this pairing severely pushed the limits of suspension of disbelief. 

The animals and the landscapes are more than sufficient reason to watch this movie.

8.9/10

 

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