Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

I love Hatari! Such a non typical Wayne movie.  RedButtons made this movie in my opinion. Very underrated talent.

I'm still surprised the goat milking scene made it through censors.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Madeleine (1950) It was a struggle but I made it through this. A plodding retelling of an actual murder case that occurred in Scotland in 1857. Directed by David Lean with Ann Todd, his wife, in the the lead role. It is certainly competent enough overall, maybe better than that even, and surely played better in its own day that it did me.  The action of the novel made me think of a subplot in Anthony Trollope's Palliser novel The Prime Minister, in which a bounder/adventurer/foreigne seeks to marry the daughter of a rich nobleman. Not an uncommon situation in Victorian-Era intrigue and I have probably become jaded in trying to enjoy this sort of thing anymore, and this rather staid account didn't help.

Madeleine Poster

Ann Todd was immensely disappointing. She shows more life in the poster than she does throughout the entire film. She seemed to sleepwalk her through the role. She makes the appropriate acting moves but there is not an iota of vitality. She seems bored with the whole thing. And then I read AFTER viewing the film that Lean cast her in the role as a birthday present. Note to Directors : Find the right person for the role, don't do your wives and friends a favor (unless of course you can get away with it).

~ ~ tcm

* * * * * 1/2

///

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, laffite said:

Madeleine (1950) It was a struggle but I made it through this. A plodding retelling of an actual murder case that occurred in Scotland in 1857. Directed by David Lean with Ann Todd, his wife, in the the lead role. It is certainly competent enough overall, maybe better than that even, and surely played better in its own day that it did me.  The action of the novel made me think of a subplot in Anthony Trollope's Palliser novel The Prime Minister, in which a bounder/adventurer/foreigne seeks to marry the daughter of a rich nobleman. Not an uncommon situation in Victorian-Era intrigue and I have probably become jaded in trying to enjoy this sort of thing anymore, and this rather staid account didn't help.

Madeleine Poster

Ann Todd was immensely disappointing. She shows more life in the poster than she does throughout the entire film. She seemed to sleepwalk her through the role. She makes the appropriate acting moves but there is not an iota of vitality. She seems bored with the whole thing. And then I read AFTER viewing the film that Lean cast her in the role as a birthday present. Note to Directors : Find the right person for the role, don't do your wives and friends a favor (unless of course you can get away with it).

~ ~ tcm

* * * * * 1/2

///

I like the film more than you do, but it does have some issues, yes.  It is DAVID LEAN'S only unremarkable film.

I sorta kinda get the feeling that THE REALLY INTERESTING STORY is what went on BEHIND THE SCENES on this one.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, SansFin said:

I am not a fan of John Wayne.

And I am, which surprises me on multiple fronts. I don't tend to go for machismo or conservatism and The Good Lord knows THE DUKE and I would NOT BE ABLE TO TALK POLITICS FOR LONGER THAN 10 SECONDS were we to have ever crossed paths in real life.

also many of his movies are very very bad, but many are also very very good, and he is excellent in more than handful of them, like a slightly less masculine MAE WEST who was more capable of showing emotion, albeit it more with the eyes or the face than the voice.

Also I am named after one of his characters, but that doesn;t have much to do with my liking of him as an actor.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

And I am, which surprises me on multiple fronts. I don't tend to go for machismo or conservatism and The Good Lord knows THE DUKE and I would NOT BE ABLE TO TALK POLITICS FOR LONGER THAN 10 SECONDS were we to have ever crossed paths in real life.

also many of his movies are very very bad, but many are also very very good, and he is excellent in more than handful of them, like a slightly less masculine MAE WEST who was more capable of showing emotion, albeit it more with the eyes or the face than the voice.

Also I am named after one of his characters, but that doesn;t have much to do with my liking of him as an actor.

That does surprise me. I can only guess that you fell in love with the persona he created for his acting. 

I am sure that a large part of my not being a fan is that westerns and American war movies are generally not to my taste. The movies in which I like him most are: Hatari (1962) and Hellfighters (1968).

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Having seen and loved Nebraska (2013) during TCM's 31 Days of Oscar, I checked out The Descendants (2011), which was comparatively a disappointment, though well enough made. In Nebraska Alexander Payne gets the tone exactly right; in The Descendants he doesn't, and for this kind of movie that's a problem. You'd think a movie about Hawaii would be more interesting than a movie about Nebraska, but it isn't. The movie begins with George Clooney in voiceover talking about the Hawaii tourists don't see. If only we got to see more of that Hawaii. If only the movie were really about the descendants--the descendants of a large amount of land held in trust--some having become rich from their money from the trust, some having squandered what they received, some having a connection to their native ancestors and some not. Surely there could be a great movie in that subject. Instead, the subplot is about whether the land should be sold to Big Evil Corporate Real Estate Developers or kept virgin and pure so that maybe Clooney can figure something out before the trust terminates in seven years.

As for the main plot--Clooney's wife is in a coma following a boating accident, do we pull the plug, etc.--the various reactions of people to this situation are honestly enough done, probably at too much length. Clooney is a good-looking guy and not a bad actor. He does a decent job of playing what's on the page, but he suggests little of the past or the inner life of his character.  Other people tell him about his shortcomings as a man, as a husband, and as a father, but we don't see much of this reflected in his own performance. He has a teenage daughter and a ten-year-old who seem less like real people than like ideas about children acting out in times of emotional stress. Some, like me, will dislike the fact that the children use so much profanity. It seems like a crutch for the screenwriters, an easy way out.

A major problem is that for the first hour not one of the characters is particularly likable. The father, the oldest daughter, and her boyfriend grow more likable in the second half, but this may be too late.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Having seen and loved Nebraska (2013) during TCM's 31 Days of Oscar, I checked out The Descendants (2011), which was comparatively a disappointment, though well enough made. In Nebraska Alexander Payne gets the tone exactly right; in The Descendants he doesn't, and for this kind of movie that's a problem. You'd think a movie about Hawaii would be more interesting than a movie about Nebraska, but it isn't. The movie begins with George Clooney in voiceover talking about the Hawaii tourists don't see. If only we got to see more of that Hawaii. If only the movie were really about the descendants--the descendants of a large amount of land held in trust--some having become rich from their money from the trust, some having squandered what they received, some having a connection to their native ancestors and some not. Surely there could be a great movie in that subject. Instead, the subplot is about whether the land should be sold to Big Evil Corporate Real Estate Developers or kept virgin and pure so that maybe Clooney can figure something out before the trust terminates in seven years.

As for the main plot--Clooney's wife is in a coma following a boating accident, do we pull the plug, etc.--the various reactions of people to this situation are honestly enough done, probably at too much length. Clooney is a good-looking guy and not a bad actor. He does a decent job of playing what's on the page, but he suggests little of the past or the inner life of his character.  Other people tell him about his shortcomings as a man, as a husband, and as a father, but we don't see much of this reflected in his own performance. He has a teenage daughter and a ten-year-old who seem less like real people than like ideas about children acting out in times of emotional stress. Some, like me, will dislike the fact that the children use so much profanity. It seems like a crutch for the screenwriters, an easy way out.

A major problem is that for the first hour not one of the characters is particularly likable. The father, the oldest daughter, and her boyfriend grow more likable in the second half, but this may be too late.

Oh baby. I love the Descendants. 

Part of why is because the subject matter of the family squabbling over the estate is something I'm rather familiar with. You haven't seen ugly until you see what becomes of a family fighting over an estate.

Clooney does a wonderful job as the clueless husband married to his legal career oblivious to his marriage in full death rattle and his daughters growing up with little respect  for their parents and little parental guidance. It all comes to a head, the pressure from less frugal family members on the trust, the daughters spinning out of control and the end of medical options with his comatose wife.  Clooneys deer in the headlights moment when he learns of his wife's affair is the turning point. The father, the daughters and the pot head friend are the motley-est of crews but somehow they compliment each other to create a force for truth and justice that sets everything on correct path no matter how much those involved like it or not.

AND, I liked Nebraska too!

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

And I am, which surprises me on multiple fronts. I don't tend to go for machismo or conservatism and The Good Lord knows THE DUKE and I would NOT BE ABLE TO TALK POLITICS FOR LONGER THAN 10 SECONDS were we to have ever crossed paths in real life.

also many of his movies are very very bad, but many are also very very good, and he is excellent in more than handful of them, like a slightly less masculine MAE WEST who was more capable of showing emotion, albeit it more with the eyes or the face than the voice.

Also I am named after one of his characters, but that doesn;t have much to do with my liking of him as an actor.

Goin' out on a limb here Lorna, but I take it the reason you like Big Duke is for an entirely different reason than why you like Maxwell Caulfield, huh.  ;)

(...btw, would I be correct in assuming that your real name is Ethan?...well, I certainly hope your parents didn't name you Ringo Kid, anyway!!!)

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Dargo said:

Goin' out on a limb here Lorna, but I take it the reason you like Big Duke is for an entirely different reason than why you like Maxwell Caulfield, huh.  ;)

(...btw, would I be correct in assuming that your real name is Ethan?...well, I certainly hope your parents didn't name you Ringo Kid, anyway!!!)

You are correct on BOTH ACCOUNTS, Good Sir! 
 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon Poster

Tell Me That You Love Me Junie Moon (1970) TCM -6/10

A woman with a scarred face (Liza Minnelli), an epileptic (Ken Howard) and a gay paraplegic (Robert Moore) decide to move in together after meeting in the hospital.

Otto Preminger directed this interesting though uneven film, he seems to want to take advantage of the new permissiveness in films. It's a bit too long (112 min) and wavers between campy comedy and disturbing drama. The three leads help keep it afloat. Ann Revere returns to the screen here, playing a hospital social worker. Kay Thompson makes her last film appearance as a flighty landlord. Former football star Fred Williamson plays a muscular beach boy, he would later become a star in black action movies of the 1970s. James Coco has a good role as the owner of a local fish market who befriends the trio. I also liked the song "Old Devil Time" sung by folk singer Pete Seeger, who performs it on screen at the beginning.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon Poster

Tell Me That You Love Me Junie Moon (1970) TCM -6/10

A woman with a scarred face (Liza Minnelli), an epileptic (Ken Howard) and a gay paraplegic (Robert Moore) decide to move in together after meeting in the hospital.

Otto Preminger directed this interesting though uneven film, he seems to want to take advantage of the new permissiveness in films. It's a bit too long (112 min) and wavers between campy comedy and disturbing drama. The three leads help keep it afloat. Ann Revere returns to the screen here, playing a hospital social worker. Kay Thompson makes her last film appearance as a flighty landlord. Former football star Fred Williamson plays a muscular beach boy, he would later become a star in black action movies of the 1970s. James Coco has a good role as the owner of a local fish market who befriends the trio. I also liked the song "Old Devil Time" sung by folk singer Pete Seeger, who performs it on screen at the beginning.

NICE SONG. CAN SOMEONE TELL LIZA THAT YOU DON'T HITCHHIKE ON TRAINS THOUGH?

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon Poster

Tell Me That You Love Me Junie Moon (1970) TCM -6/10

A woman with a scarred face (Liza Minnelli), an epileptic (Ken Howard) and a gay paraplegic (Robert Moore) decide to move in together after meeting in the hospital.

Otto Preminger directed this interesting though uneven film, he seems to want to take advantage of the new permissiveness in films. It's a bit too long (112 min) and wavers between campy comedy and disturbing drama. The three leads help keep it afloat. Ann Revere returns to the screen here, playing a hospital social worker. Kay Thompson makes her last film appearance as a flighty landlord. Former football star Fred Williamson plays a muscular beach boy, he would later become a star in black action movies of the 1970s. James Coco has a good role as the owner of a local fish market who befriends the trio. I also liked the song "Old Devil Time" sung by folk singer Pete Seeger, who performs it on screen at the beginning.

Agree re: the unevenness.   The middle third wanders a bit, and Howard's dream/flashback sequence goes on a bit too long, IMO.  The camp bit is, I think, appropriate, because a character like Moore's would almost assuredly relate his story in a campy manner.  Large parts of the dialogue for the scenes in the dilapidated rental home had to be dubbed, and even the parts that weren't dubbed are of poor technical quality.  I wonder why they had such issues recording dialogue inside that house? (and it looked like it was done on location, rather than in a studio)

I never knew until last night when looking up some things on IMDb that Robert Moore in Junie Moon also played Phyllis' brother in a well-known episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show.  He was a well-regarded theater director (The Boys in the Band, Promises, Promises, and numerous others, with 5 Tony noms), and was a director of a number of episodes of the MTM spin-off Rhoda, and had previously been an actor on Broadway, starting at age 15.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

NICE SONG. CAN SOMEONE TELL LIZA THAT YOU DON'T HITCHHIKE ON TRAINS THOUGH?

This is the song her gay hubby-of-the-day, Peter Allen, wrote for the film, but was not used for it in the end. 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, txfilmfan said:

Robert Moore in Junie Moon also played Phyllis' brother in a well-known episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show.

Yes, one of the best episodes, a great twist ending.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/11/2021 at 1:35 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I don't tend to go for machismo or conservatism and The Good Lord knows THE DUKE and I would NOT BE ABLE TO TALK POLITICS FOR LONGER THAN 10 SECONDS were we to have ever crossed paths in real life.

I'm only responsible for what I say, not for what you understand. - J 01111  Wayne - iFunny :) | Cowboy quotes, John wayne quotes, Badass quotes

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

one of JOHN WAYNE'S best- yet least talked about [thanks to its being trapped in Rights Issues Hell for many years] - performances was in HONDO from 1953 with the unlikely, but dynamic pairing of he and GERALDINE PAGE, who was nominated for a BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS OSCAR but should have been in THE LEAD CATEGORY for this film, WAYNE too, it's one of his most complicated parts.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The Unseen 1945 Paramount directed by Lewis Allen  screenplay by Raymond Chandler with Joel McCrea Gail Russell Herbert Marshall Phyllis Brooks. A mystery-film noir movie .Lewis Allen first full length film was the very good The Uninvited done the year before with Russell and Ray Milland in the lead.The Unseen is a disappointment for me.Could have been better it had a great cast.After this movie Joel McCrea concentrated on westerns only for the rest of his career except for Roughshod  in the 50's.  6.5/10

unseen.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

NICE SONG. CAN SOMEONE TELL LIZA THAT YOU DON'T HITCHHIKE ON TRAINS THOUGH?

God, this film stunk!!! I read the book when it was published a year or so before the film and liked it, but I never saw the film as it bombed and played off quickly. Can see why! Can't really blame Preminger that much. (Unless he's responsible for the clumsy flashbacks, but I guess he can be blamed for the static scenes and lighting) The screenwriter wrote the novel so can't blame Hollywood either. I had to FF through chunks of the film, especially the beach sequence (luckily wasnt watching it in real time, so could do so) Boy, Ken Howard was cute when he was young! But his body needed some work. (LOL)

What was with Pete Seeger bookending the film (I think that was him?) The music didnt fit the mod 60s music in the film itself.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Chief Crazy Horse 1955 Universal directed by George Sherman Victor Mature Ray Danton Suzan Ball David Janssen has a small role.Mature is very good probably his best acting in the 50's. This film is  from the Sioux's side which was uncommon of course the main leads are white actors in make-up as it was the custom then,  Cinematography is beautiful in superb Technicolor Cinemascope ,Informative but a bit slow. The female lead  Suzan Ball( related to Lucy) died when the film was released she died of cancer at only 21,her leg got amputated and she made the film anyway using body doubles and various tricks a sad story.. 7/10

CRAZY.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Tell Me That You Love Me, Junie Moon Poster

Tell Me That You Love Me Junie Moon (1970) TCM -6/10

A woman with a scarred face (Liza Minnelli), an epileptic (Ken Howard) and a gay paraplegic (Robert Moore) decide to move in together after meeting in the hospital.

Otto Preminger directed this interesting though uneven film, he seems to want to take advantage of the new permissiveness in films. It's a bit too long (112 min) and wavers between campy comedy and disturbing drama. The three leads help keep it afloat. Ann Revere returns to the screen here, playing a hospital social worker. Kay Thompson makes her last film appearance as a flighty landlord. Former football star Fred Williamson plays a muscular beach boy, he would later become a star in black action movies of the 1970s. James Coco has a good role as the owner of a local fish market who befriends the trio. I also liked the song "Old Devil Time" sung by folk singer Pete Seeger, who performs it on screen at the beginning.

THAT was Kay Thompson????? I missed most of the opening credits so didnt realize that. Or Ann Revere either! (I thought she looked familiar, similar to Colleen Dewhurst, but I knew it wasn't her) Thompson's character was ghastly and should've been cut ENTIRELY! The film could've benefited being cut to 90 mins. Really dragged in spots and the dialogue didn't help.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I knew that Junie Moon would get a polarized reception here. Its a really bizarre film, but I actually liked it when I saw it 3 years ago though I thought that the flashback to how Liza got scarred was pretty sadistic.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Yes, one of the best episodes, a great twist ending.

Yes. A funny episode.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

I knew that Junie Moon would get a polarized reception here. Its a really bizarre film, but I actually liked it when I saw it 3 years ago though I thought that the flashback to how Liza got scarred was pretty sadistic.

What was his motivation anyway?  He likes to disfigure his first dates? The whole sequence was badly filmed and what he does comes out of nowhere.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2021 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...