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7 hours ago, Hibi said:

I don't remember one at all! I'll have to look for him next viewing. I'd never seen this film (but knew of it) until a year ago when it was on TCM.

I've seen it a few times over the years but never really noticed a guy that would be homosexual just

by looking at him. The hippie, who turned out to be the undercover cop, was pretty easy to ID. I

always get a kick out of the scene where Matthau shows the Japanese officials around the place

and he starts to make fun of them, assuming they don't speak English. Then at the end they show

they can speak English. Oops. 

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The Mummy Who Came in from the Cold (2007)

 

Egypt is renowned for the numerous rituals and elaborate preparation of its mummies but it is simple fact that they can occur with little or no preparation anywhere that conditions desiccate the body before it begins to putrefy. 

This fascinating little documentary shows the discovery and further investigation of a mummy in Sakha. That is the region which most typifies the mental image which most Western people have of Siberia. It is barren. It is cold. It is hundreds of miles of nothing but miles and miles.

Bodies buried there in ancient times became mummies in the grave because the permafrost inhibited both chemical and microbial action while it caused also the bodies to dry out in a process similar to freezer burn on an intense scale.

They touch on discovery and research of a typical mummy. Then they find one which is very special. The clothes are silk and leather trimmed with mink and are elaborately beaded. The garment which served as a garter belt to hold up leggings and which would not be seen when she was dressed was made of silver and copper and was covered in beads. They had never before found signs of such wealth.

Perplexing to the researchers is that her feet were bound by rope which encircled her body also.  The ends of her sleeves had been sewn closed to prevent her using her hands after death. 

I am an easy mark for interesting regional history and for examples of how researchers solve mysteries. This documentary has both. It is slightly less than an hour long and so is not a great commitment for the curious.

8.8/10

It is available for viewing for free with commercials on: TubiTV. 

 

 

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15 hours ago, Vautrin said:

I always miss "The Homosexual" in The Taking of Pelham One Two Three. That's how the role is

given on the end credits. I'm guessing that back in the day it was done in a pretty stereotypical

way, but I still don't recall him. He might have had so little time on screen that I missed him.

Really? I thought he was pretty memorable.

See the source image

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"so, what kind of credits do you have? Any features?"

"Mostly stage work, although I did a year on ONE LIFE TO LIVE and I played "The Homosexual" in "The Taking of Pelham 1, 2, 3...."

"Ah, I don't remember a Homosexual in that film..."

"It was a brief part, besides not a lot of people saw it."

"That's a shame."

"I know. I was a great Homosexual. And I got to meet Robert Shaw!"

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in all seriousness though, in the early 1970's, WALTER MATHAU took a very risky- and in retrospect stunningly successful- foray into a whole series of serious, gritty, violent and not at all funny films. CHARLIE VARRICK is really good, as is PELHAM and I am curious about THE LAUGHING POLICEMAN, but it seems like it rarely airs.

I am hard pressed to think of another actor who transitioned from comedy into drama as successfully as MATHAU did, even if he did end up returning to comedy for the most part.

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9 hours ago, Vautrin said:

Okay. Guess he wasn't on screen very long. I'll have to concentrate next time I see it.

I remember him now.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

in all seriousness though, in the early 1970's, WALTER MATHAU took a very risky- and in retrospect stunningly successful- foray into a whole series of serious, gritty, violent and not at all funny films. CHARLIE VARRICK is really good, as is PELHAM and I am curious about THE LAUGHING POLICEMAN, but it seems like it rarely airs.

I am hard pressed to think of another actor who transitioned from comedy into drama as successfully as MATHAU did, even if he did end up returning to comedy for the most part.

I don't remember The Laughing Policeman. I wonder how the remake of Pelham compares to the original?

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4 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I don't remember The Laughing Policeman. I wonder how the remake of Pelham compares to the original?

I didn't see it, but I'll go out on a limb and say it SUCKED.

(Based on all the other TERRIBLE remakes and reboots and retcons and revamps and such that I have seen.)

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I am curious about THE LAUGHING POLICEMAN, but it seems like it rarely airs.

It is worth seeing, one of Matthau's most serious roles as a cynical cop investigating a mass murder on a bus. He is tougher and meaner here than most of his 1970s roles, he even slaps a woman around (played by Cathy Lee Crosby). Bruce Dern plays his talkative, wise cracking new partner, he supplies what little comedy there is in this.

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From the last few days:

Underworld U.S.A. (1961)  Enjoyed it.  Didn't think it could end any other way than it did.

The Sugarland Express (1974) Liked seeing William Atherton in a lead role.  Thought there were some cool shots by Spielberg and I liked this better than Badlands TBH.

Gilda (1946) First time finally watching this.  Was warned the plot was hard to follow but thought it was pretty straight-forward.  Will be watching this again in the future.  Still have Put the Blame on Mame stuck in my head.

Cleo From 5 to 7 (1962) Thought it was well made and like the film within the film with the famous cameos, but not as enjoyable to watch as most other New Wave films for me.

 

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9 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Really? I thought he was pretty memorable.

See the source image

Good old Rip R.I.P.  If Shaw and his gang saw him coming down the subway car they might

have waited for a better opportunity. The screenwriter at least could have given him a line

or two. Oh mister conductor, do you mind I touch your third rail?

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9 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

"so, what kind of credits do you have? Any features?"

"Mostly stage work, although I did a year on ONE LIFE TO LIVE and I played "The Homosexual" in "The Taking of Pelham 1, 2, 3...."

"Ah, I don't remember a Homosexual in that film..."

"It was a brief part, besides not a lot of people saw it."

"That's a shame."

"I know. I was a great Homosexual. And I got to meet Robert Shaw!"

"And later Truman called me and said I was the best homosexual in a subway movie he had

ever seen. Of course he rides in taxis, but I was thrilled all the same."

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7 hours ago, Hibi said:

I remember him now.

That will give me another reason to watch it again. I remember seeing the remake, maybe on one of

those free HBO/Cinemax, et al. weekends. Nowhere as good as the original, but entertaining enough.

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On 5/20/2021 at 2:22 PM, SansFin said:

Movies which I consider a good pairing with: The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974) for a double feature because they carry some of the same vibe or are an interesting counterpoint:

Have you seen the Martin Sheen movie The Incident?  It would fit too and is highly worth watching.

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2 hours ago, Vautrin said:

That will give me another reason to watch it again. I remember seeing the remake, maybe on one of

those free HBO/Cinemax, et al. weekends. Nowhere as good as the original, but entertaining enough.

Am not sure  he even had any lines. I dont remember. Wasnt in the film too long.

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2 minutes ago, Fedya said:

Have you seen the Martin Sheen movie The Incident?  It would fit too and is highly worth watching.

I have. Yeah, would make a good double bill. IF the Incident was shown last. Really nasty film.

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1 hour ago, Hibi said:

I have. Yeah, would make a good double bill. IF the Incident was shown last. Really nasty film.

Both of them have similar stereotypical passengers, including a passed-out drunk that sleeps through the whole thing.

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6 hours ago, Hibi said:

Am not sure  he even had any lines. I dont remember. Wasnt in the film too long.

Probably not. I'll be on the lookout.

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Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (2016)

 

"It is a truth universally acknowledged that a zombie in possession of brains must be in want of more brains. Never was this truth more plain than in the recent attacks at Netherfield Park, in which an entire household was slaughtered by a horde of the living dead during a whist party."

Darcy is a noted zombie killer with a strident manner and dour aspect. Elizabeth and her sisters are all Shaolin-trained to protect their family and estate.

This movie is not in any manner as silly or camp or stupid as the title might lead a potential viewer to believe. It is a fairly respectable retelling of the Jane Austen borefest while breathing some life into that whiny fairy tale. The main difference is that it is set during a zombie infestation and so the characters' personal needs and desires are subordinate to their greater duty to family and society. The adaptation is intelligently and delicately done. I am sorry to say that I fear this means that the movie will sink out of sight and not properly valued by serious cinephiles nor enter the ranks of cult movies. 

The movie's greatest flaw is that it follows the original story more closely than it deserves and so drags interminably in several places. 

7.5/10

It is available for viewing free with commercials on: IMDb.TV.

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I had never seen "The Taking of Pelham 1-2-3" until I watched it Thursday night on TCM on Demand.  Overall, it was a good watch, but I thought parts of it were a bit draggy for me.  Of course, I base this on whether I not I pause the picture if I have to use the bathroom.  For Pelham, I didn't pause it for those breaks!  I thought it was interesting that the hijackers were, for the most part, the calm and cool guys as they attempted to pull off the heist, while the people in charge...the police, the mayor, the people at the transit authority were the ones losing their minds and potentially, control of the situation.  To me, they were about as annoying as the hostages on the sequestered subway car, and for a time, I found myself rooting for the bad guys!  Walter Matthau is the fellow who keeps things together for the good guys, while Hector Elizondo is the crook who proves to be the undoing of the bad guys.

I hadn't been interested in watching this film when it came on TCM in the past, but based on TikiSoo's review of it, I thought I'd give it a go.  Not a bad way to spend a Thursday night.  I'd give it a 7 out of 10.  I didn't really like the condescension that was openly leveled at the woman working in the Transit Authority or the Japanese transit observers from Tokyo.  The mealy-mouthed mayor was a turn-off too.  The alcoholic woman who slept for the duration of the film was unnecessary to the plot--she should have 'gotten it' first!

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