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3 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

Thanks, Moe.  I never knew that thread existed....sad to say, I don't seem to spend as much time here as I used to,  and am often unaware of threads that might interest me.

Yeah, you were away during that one so I thought I'd bring to your attention. 

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40 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Ended up rewatching Chaplin again last night. I had seen it almost 7 years ago, and loved it back then. It holds up beautifully. Robert Downey Jr so thoroughly disappeared into the role of Charlie Chaplin that I began to forget it was him. Lots of entertaining cameos, a lush production, moving finale, great production values....

I made the mistake of watching Modern Times before Chaplin. Anybody want to buy a well used DVD of Chaplin?

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9 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I'm amazed at how ubiquitous this was when I was a kid & now can't find anyone to play-never realized this was a "regional" card game.

I grew up in New Jersey and have lived in a couple of other states in the East and I never remember hearing

of euchre, so I think it is most popular in the Midwest. I'd have to start from scratch as I no longer remember

how to play it. 

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I have a Scribner's Library edition of LH, A. It runs to 520 pages. I likely bought it sometime in the

1980s. On the back cover are listed some of Wolfe's other works. Of Time and the River, his second

novel, is in two volumes. You've been forewarned. Yes, Thomas Wolfe is the one who didn't wear white suits.

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56 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Sister Act was such fun though. As for Basic Instinct, regardless of what one can say about the film, the ad department did a great job with the trailer that helped lure people in. It was fast, touch, sexy, violent, and very punchy looking.

I actually thought SHARON STONE was fabulous in INSTINCT. 
 

A couple weeks back I thought about starting a thread dedicated to The fact that the 1990s were truly, and tragically, the “last decade for leading ladies”.
 

We just don’t have female movie stars/actresses anymore like we did in the 90s, they were the last of the line.

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2 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I actually thought SHARON STONE was fabulous in INSTINCT. 
 

A couple weeks back I thought about starting a thread dedicated to The fact that the 1990s were truly, and tragically, the “last decade for leading ladies”.
 

We just don’t have female movie stars/actresses anymore like we did in the 90s, they were the last of the line.

Stone's performance continues to grow in stature, with most concluding it was a great turn. Even at the time, the film critics group in Chicago picked her and two other women playing dangerous characters in 1992 as being their joint best actress pick for the year and she was up for the golden Globe.

The 90s feel like the end of the line in several ways. There is no way to deny that there have been some good films since then, some decent TV shows, but something just went out of the industry after the 90s ended. Most of the new set of stars that came up after the 90s never fully won me over. I have great affection for the early half of the 90s, and agree that the actresses of the period were the last ones to have the real bearings of movie stars.

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It is now possible to win three, count 'em, three, Oscars without being a movie star. Case in point: Frances McDormand. Case in point: Daniel Day Lewis. Now one can admire them as actors--or not, in the case of Lorna and Frances--but movie stars they are not.

Something similar has happened on Broadway. The long-running show is itself the star, with multiple cast replacements. Perhaps Idina Menzel and Kristen Chenoweth became stars as a result of Wicked, but not because they went on do other Broadway shows. Menzel is best known for singing an unavoidable song from an animated movie and Chenoweth perhaps best known from television. Ethel Merman and Mary Martin (widely known throughout the culture to people who never saw a Broadway show) they aren't.

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One reason we knew the Broadway stars without ever leaving our small towns was the variety shows.  Mary Martin and Carol Channing were frequent guests.  I really miss those things, without them I would never have heard singers outside my usual teenage bubble and I have always loved sketch comedy.

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7 hours ago, SansFin said:

It is obvious that I can not state with certainty but it is my suspicion that you are referring to: O Lost. That is the reconstruction of the original manuscript. You might think of it as the Director's Cut of: Look Homeward, Angel. It was published by University of South Carolina Press in: 2000. It is listed at: 744 pages.

O lost : a story of the buried life : Wolfe, Thomas, 1900-1938 : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

The novel which he submitted needed extensive edits prior to publication to shorten and clarify it. That is very common with first novels. 

Did anyone here see Genius (2016) (https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1703957/)? It's about Max Perkins, who at Scribner's edited Look Homeward, Angel. (I didn't see it because I am allergic to modern docupics made by white males to celebrate the achievements of dead white males. Also, obvious Oscar bait is obvious.) It features Colin Firth as Perkins, Jude Law as Wolfe, Guy Pierce as Fitzgerald, and Dominic West as Hemingway, to which I respond "Just who is handing out green cards willy-nilly?"

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34 minutes ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

Did anyone here see Genius (2016) (https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1703957/)? It's about Max Perkins, who at Scribner's edited Look Homeward, Angel. (I didn't see it because I am allergic to modern docupics made by white males to celebrate the achievements of dead white males. Also, obvious Oscar bait is obvious.) It features Colin Firth as Perkins, Jude Law as Wolfe, Guy Pierce as Fitzgerald, and Dominic West as Hemingway, to which I respond "Just who is handing out green cards willy-nilly?"

I only just today discovered its existence. I don’t keep up with movies these days. I’m the same w/ the docupics 

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43 minutes ago, Polly of the Precodes said:

Did anyone here see Genius (2016) (https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1703957/)? It's about Max Perkins, who at Scribner's edited Look Homeward, Angel. (I didn't see it because I am allergic to modern docupics made by white males to celebrate the achievements of dead white males. Also, obvious Oscar bait is obvious.) It features Colin Firth as Perkins, Jude Law as Wolfe, Guy Pierce as Fitzgerald, and Dominic West as Hemingway, to which I respond "Just who is handing out green cards willy-nilly?"

Haven't seen it. But it's a British film, shot mostly in England. I don't understand the green card comment; but at any rate, since they were mostly Brits making a film in the UK, I don't think Willy Nilly needed to hand them out.

 

 

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

We just don’t have female movie stars/actresses anymore like we did in the 90s, they were the last of the line.

Jennifer Lawrence? 

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24 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Eh, a reasonable facsimile thereof, but nah. 
 

I don't know. Hunger Games, Silver Linings Playbook, American Hustle, Joy. . . .even Passengers.  At a certain point you have to examine the vehicles and whether they allow for a 'leading lady' to rise to the surface. The Me Too movement didn't help.

I'm not saying she's the only one either, Emma Stone and Marisa Tomei come to mind.

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Unless there was a hood attached. 

I don't think many Harvard grads were in the Klan. I remember reading a number of years ago that the

higher ups in the Klan made a fistful of money selling robes and lots of other Klan paraphernalia to

the yahoos. They were very lucrative positions. 

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7 minutes ago, Vautrin said:

I don't think many Harvard grads were in the Klan. I remember reading a number of years ago that the

higher ups in the Klan made a fistful of money selling robes and lots of other Klan paraphernalia to

the yahoos. They were very lucrative positions. 

It's always the first that get in those pyramid schemes that cash in on the merchandising concession. 

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3 hours ago, Moe Howard said:

It's always the first that get in those pyramid schemes that cash in on the merchandising concession. 

That's true. I don't know if the Klan was strictly a pyramid scheme, but I'd guess it had

similarities to one. Call it Klanway.

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Tomorrow at Seven (1933)

 

An egomaniacal serial killer warns his victims of their impending death. A crime novelist investigating the murders woos a girl so that she will have her father introduce him to a man who has collected much information on the killer. That man then receives a warning of his coming death.

This movie has: Chester Morris, Henry Stephenson, Grant Mitchell and an intriguing premise. I am sorry to say that it falls flat despite that. 

Frank McHugh and Allen Jenkins play inept detectives. I believe the failure of the movie rests on them. They are both excellent as second bananas but they have only each other to play off of here. There is no superior officer to keep them in check or show frustration at their failures. 

I do not expect perfection from a 1933 comedy murder mystery because they were still learning what works and what does not. I am sorry to say this is a grand example of what does not work.

4.4/11


 

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~ God,s Little Acre. ---

. ... ..

While.. Mr Buddy Hackett is (a bit of) a Surprise in this Feature.. ... (i) Find the Film to Be.. - While Quite, And Substantially "Plain" and "Ordinary"..

 

 

     I Find the Film to Be.. ... .......Darn, Well Performed and Acted.. ...with An AllOut Immersive Script and VERY Impressive Direction,.

. ..

The.. ... LOVELY.. ...KALOS, Beaming ..BareFooted Face, In the Field; Towards the (VERY) End of this film.. .. .....Is One ofthe PRETTIEST Smiles, inALL... ..Of Cinema ...

🎨🌈

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this is an interesting article i came across online RIPPING THE FILM SHREK TO BITS ON ITS 20TH ANNIVERSARY, i share it because I admire the Hell out of a contrarian viewpoint (also, I didn't think SHREK was "all that" either)

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2021/may/17/shrek-20-unfunny-overrated-low-blockbuster?utm_source=pocket-newtab

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More re: Look Homeward, Angel

I have a faint recollection of seeing the Ketti Frings adaptation on network television in the early 1970s.

I remember it starred Timothy Bottoms and Geraldine Page, but I remember little else.  I wonder if it's available somewhere....

 

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15 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I only just today discovered its existence. I don’t keep up with movies these days. I’m the same w/ the docupics 

I teach writing at the college level, so I've seen it multiple times.  I think it's a great film about the writing process and the relationship between a writer and an editor.  I'm always challenging my students to cut unnecessay verbiage, and the scene in which Thomas Wolfe is instructed to cut down his description of the blue eyes is a clip I often show.  Of course, both Jude Law and Colin Firth are easy on the eye.  Law is excellent, by the way, as the "hot mess" of a Southern writer.

 

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18 hours ago, AndreaDoria said:

One reason we knew the Broadway stars without ever leaving our small towns was the variety shows.  Mary Martin and Carol Channing were frequent guests.  I really miss those things, without them I would never have heard singers outside my usual teenage bubble and I have always loved sketch comedy.

MeTV has showing clips from the old Ed Sullivan Show on Sunday evenings.   I've started recording them; they often show scenes from Broadway shows.   

It’s  kind of an enjoyable time capsule of the 1960s/ early 1970s.

You might want to check it out if you get MeTV in your area…...   

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1 minute ago, CallMeTim said:

MeTV has showing clips from the old Ed Sullivan Show on Sunday evenings.   I've started recording them; they often show scenes from Broadway shows.   

It’s  kind of an enjoyable time capsule of the 1960s/ early 1970s.

You might want to check it out if you get MeTV in your area…...   

Decades also runs the old Sullivan show every weekday.  It's a sister channel to MeTV.

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