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On 5/20/2021 at 3:00 PM, Hibi said:

LOL. Wasn't this after he dried out and found religion?

 

Dunno about that, but he spent his whole talk complaining about how P.T. Anderson had ignored the fact that porn actors of the 1970s risked arrest for prostitution.  It was a weird evening.

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I sought out short film "La Fiesta de Santa Barbara".  Famous for what I think is Judy Garland's first appearance onscreen, singing "La Cucaracha" with her sisters.  What I didn't know is that Buster Keaton is in it as well, and not just a cameo, he has a decent chunk of dialogue.  This being a couple of years after he'd been fired by MGM for alcoholism.  I think he might have been drunk when they were filming.

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4 hours ago, Vidor said:

 

Dunno about that, but he spent his whole talk complaining about how P.T. Anderson had ignored the fact that porn actors of the 1970s risked arrest for prostitution.  It was a weird evening.

Well, they did prosecute him over Deep Throat. Glad he got off. (double meaning not intended!)

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The Wayne Murder Case (1932) aka A Strange Adventure (1932)

 

A disagreeable old millionaire gathers those who expect to inherit from him and announces that they can watch him sign a new will which leaves them virtually nothing. The true mystery of this movie is why any of those people are surprised when he is murdered before he can put pen to paper.

Dwight Frye alert! He plays here one of the miserable coot's poor relation. 

The detective on the case is: Regis Toomey. This is one of the rare movies in which he does not die.

The smart-aleck newspaperwoman on the case is: June Clyde. I believe that she made twelve movies that year and she gives a very professional performance.

I find it interesting to watch movies with: Jason Robards. I find myself trying to catch glimpses in his bearing and performance which invested the talent of his more famous son.

One positive feature of the print I watched is that it is not nearly as dark as most comedy murder mysteries of the early 1930s.

6.6/10

I believe that this was available some time ago on a free streaming service but the only place I can find it now is: Amazon Prime Video.

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6 hours ago, SansFin said:

The Wayne Murder Case (1932) aka A Strange Adventure (1932)

 

A disagreeable old millionaire gathers those who expect to inherit from him and announces that they can watch him sign a new will which leaves them virtually nothing. The true mystery of this movie is why any of those people are surprised when he is murdered before he can put pen to paper.

Dwight Frye alert! He plays here one of the miserable coot's poor relation. 

The detective on the case is: Regis Toomey. This is one of the rare movies in which he does not die.

The smart-aleck newspaperwoman on the case is: June Clyde. I believe that she made twelve movies that year and she gives a very professional performance.

I find it interesting to watch movies with: Jason Robards. I find myself trying to catch glimpses in his bearing and performance which invested the talent of his more famous son.

One positive feature of the print I watched is that it is not nearly as dark as most comedy murder mysteries of the early 1930s.

6.6/10

I believe that this was available some time ago on a free streaming service but the only place I can find it now is: Amazon Prime Video.

Thank you for This review, I am still discovering just how many “reading of the will at the old dark house movies” there were in the late 1920s/early 1930s. It’s a fun genre.
 

It’s wild that you mention Jason Robards Sr. because just last night I was re-watching ISLE OF THE DEAD (1945) A Val Lewton film he did with Karloff, and oh my God he is absolutely horrible. It is just a dreadful performance, it’s almost like he’s trying to give the flattest, least animated line reads he can. It’s a pretty good movie, but damned if he doesn’t ruin every scene in which he appears.

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18 hours ago, Roy Cronin said:

The lamp in the poster is totally current Pottery Barn industrial loft chic.

Everything that goes around, comes around. Just before it was "make do" and now it is a desired style category.

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20 hours ago, LuckyDan said:

The other night on the Movies! channel I saw "Who is Harry Kellerman and Why is He Saying Those Terrible Things About Me?" from 1970 or so.

I've always been more curious about why Sally Kellerman is saying terrible things about me.

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14 hours ago, Vidor said:

I sought out short film "La Fiesta de Santa Barbara".  Famous for what I think is Judy Garland's first appearance onscreen, singing "La Cucaracha" with her sisters. 

Actually, the Gumm sisters appeared as far back as Bubbles in 1930:

La Fiesta de Santa Barbara has really nice three-strip Technicolor, too.  The picture of the guy singing alongside a horse in the TCM Extras intro is from La Fiesta de Santa Barbara, IIRC.

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I watched the James Whale version of Waterloo Bridge (1931) on TCM On Demand last night.  I had seen it once a few years back, but with This version is far superior to the cleaned-up MGM version. Mae Clarke was a revelation, an earthy, natural actress, and it's sad that she ended up being typecast as gangster's molls at Warner's.    Her acting style  reminded me a bit of a young Barbara Stanywk.  Kent Douglass (aka Douglass Montgomery) was also exceptional, despite the heavy eyeliner (I know very blonde actors often had to wear that for their eyes to photograph).  The scene where he is in tears, barking at the landlady, got me choked up.  His naivete and earnestness are a lot more believable than the wooden Robert Taylor in the remake.  In the 1931 version, there was a naturalness and intensity in both leads' performances, very un-Hollywood.  I also loved how Whale "opened up" the story in the air raid scenes.

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1 hour ago, rosebette said:

I watched the James Whale version of Waterloo Bridge (1931) on TCM On Demand last night.  I had seen it once a few years back, but with This version is far superior to the cleaned-up MGM version. Mae Clarke was a revelation, an earthy, natural actress, and it's sad that she ended up being typecast as gangster's molls at Warner's.    Her acting style  reminded me a bit of a young Barbara Stanywk.  Kent Douglass (aka Douglass Montgomery) was also exceptional, despite the heavy eyeliner (I know very blonde actors often had to wear that for their eyes to photograph).  The scene where he is in tears, barking at the landlady, got me choked up.  His naivete and earnestness are a lot more believable than the wooden Robert Taylor in the remake.  In the 1931 version, there was a naturalness and intensity in both leads' performances, very un-Hollywood.  I also loved how Whale "opened up" the story in the air raid scenes.

MAE CLARK has the most contemporary look, face and demeanor of any HOLLYWOOD ACTOR from The Golden Age that I can think of. 

I especially like the CRANE SHOT WHALE uses at the end of the film, when CLARKE'S  character is crossing the titular bridge and we sense that a judgment is coming from overhead.

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i watched

AGUIRRE: THE WRATH OF GOD

UN FILME DU WErNER HERZOG, ca. 1971

starring KLAUS KINSKI as a real d!ckhead

I mean, you take a good look at that helmet and tell me that's not on purpose:

See the source image

 

 

 

I have seen NOSFERATU THE VAMPIRE (which I love) and  I have tried to make it thru FITZCARRALDO but couldn't. I started watching this FULLY EXPECTING IT TO BE WELL OVER 2 HOURS [and a glacially paced 2 hours + at that], and thus I was STUNNED when the credits rolled at NINETY MINUTES!

All in all, this is a pretty short film! But a lively one at that, and as much a study in sociology, politics and human nature as it is a film; sort of an extra violent ANIMAL FARM set on a RAFT IN THE AMAZON in 1560.

apparently it was filmed with a 35 mm camera HERZOG stole (and kept and used again) from some FILM SCHOOL. Thusly, I can forgive the faded look and cinematography; and it's not something that counts as a strike against the movie (f anything, it beautifully compliments  the MAD GUERILLA FEEL of the whole venture), which is really quite well-paced, visually compelling and even HILARIOUS (deliberately) at moments- "I SEE THEY'VE MOVED UP TO LONGER ARROWS"- says one man in the third act as he takes one to the chest from some natives on the riverbank and falls dead into the water.

there is also a haunting image of a horse set lose in the amazon jungle that i am pretty sure died in real life; if any of you cineastes know differently, please tell me.

Also includes a great decapitation scene.

also also includes a dude who- I swear- beatboxes on a pan pipe and it is something to see.

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

MAE CLARK has the most contemporary look, face and demeanor of any HOLLYWOOD ACTOR from The Golden Age that I can think of. 

I especially like the CRANE SHOT WHALE uses at the end of the film, when CLARKE'S  character is crossing the titular bridge and we sense that a judgment is coming from overhead.

I agree with your assessment of Clark's look.  She's unaffected  I don't see the shot as judgment,  just arbitrary fate, which Myra seems to be a victim of throughout.   Even Roy's mother doesn't judge her when Myra reveals her true profession.

 

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10 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Thank you for This review, I am still discovering just how many “reading of the will at the old dark house movies” there were in the late 1920s/early 1930s. It’s a fun genre.
 

It is my understanding that the popularity of the plot was due to many early movies being based on stage plays. It was a popular trope for stage plays because it was an automatic excuse for a diverse set of characters to be in one place at one time and limited them to a minimum of interior sets. The ability to focus on current happenings rather than supplying satisfactory backstories for the characters and the economy of dressing the stage in previous-generation-chic were awesome lures. "The Cat and the Canary" exemplifies this: it was a 1922 play and movies of: 1927, 1939, 1961 and 1979. 

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2 hours ago, rosebette said:

I agree with your assessment of Clark's look.  She's unaffected  I don't see the shot as judgment,  just arbitrary fate, which Myra seems to be a victim of throughout.   Even Roy's mother doesn't judge her when Myra reveals her true profession.

 

“Judgment” was maybe not the mot juste, but there is something about the ending of WATERLOO BRIDGE The brings to mind the final paragraph of Thomas Hardy’s TESS, Where he more or less lashes out at God for being so cruel to his heroine.

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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i watched

AGUIRRE: THE WRATH OF GOD

UN FILME DU WErNER HERZOG, ca. 1971

starring KLAUS KINSKI as a real d!ckhead

I mean, you take a good look at that helmet and tell me that's not on purpose:

See the source image

 

 

 

I have seen NOSFERATU THE VAMPIRE (which I love) and  I have tried to make it thru FITZCARRALDO but couldn't. I started watching this FULLY EXPECTING IT TO BE WELL OVER 2 HOURS [and a glacially paced 2 hours + at that], and thus I was STUNNED when the credits rolled at NINETY MINUTES!

All in all, this is a pretty short film! But a lively one at that, and as much a study in sociology, politics and human nature as it is a film; sort of an extra violent ANIMAL FARM set on a RAFT IN THE AMAZON in 1560.

apparently it was filmed with a 35 mm camera HERZOG stole (and kept and used again) from some FILM SCHOOL. Thusly, I can forgive the faded look and cinematography; and it's not something that counts as a strike against the movie (f anything, it beautifully compliments  the MAD GUERILLA FEEL of the whole venture), which is really quite well-paced, visually compelling and even HILARIOUS (deliberately) at moments- "I SEE THEY'VE MOVED UP TO LONGER ARROWS"- says one man in the third act as he takes one to the chest from some natives on the riverbank and falls dead into the water.

there is also a haunting image of a horse set lose in the amazon jungle that i am pretty sure died in real life; if any of you cineastes know differently, please tell me.

Also includes a great decapitation scene.

also also includes a dude who- I swear- beatboxes on a pan pipe and it is something to see.

Lorna,   Aguirre, Wrath of God is one of my favourite movies.  I own the DVD.  The first time I saw it, years ago in what was known then as a "repertory" cinema,  I was awestruck  (hey, I was about 18 and impressionable.)  It's one of those films that's unforgettable;  unforgettable is one of the criteria I use when compiling lists of favourite movies.

As you say, there are certain scenes in it that just stay in your mind long after you've viewed the film.   And the main character,  Aguirre ! Completely insane !  And Klaus Kinski's performance kind of makes you think he's insane too !    It's just a really powerful film .

...by the way, I've heard Werner Herzog interviewed, and he sounds like an exceptionally intelligent and nice man .

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16 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

“Judgment” was maybe not the mot juste, but there is something about the ending of WATERLOO BRIDGE The brings to mind the final paragraph of Thomas Hardy’s TESS, Where he more or less lashes out at God for being so cruel to his heroine.

We're on the same wavelength.  I was thinking of Hardy and Tess, too, when I thought of the ending.  The irony of Waterloo Bridge is that the young lover accepts the woman as she is from the outset, but fate is stronger than love.

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22 minutes ago, Vidor said:

Here's irony: the best film version of "Tess of the d'Urbervilles" was made by *Roman Polanski*.  It's very good.

I KNOW, RIGHT?!?!?!

(Being highly familiar with the subject matter probably helped.)

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17 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Lorna,   Aguirre, Wrath of God is one of my favourite movies.

...by the way, I've heard Werner Herzog interviewed, and he sounds like an exceptionally intelligent and nice man .

 

he is also THE WORLD AMBASSADOR FOR WELTSCHMERTZ.

It's wild to me that- after THE HELL ON EARTH that must've been the filming of AGUIRRE- HERZOG decided to do it all again with KINSKI in the very very very similar FITZCARRALDO; but maybe he was unhappy with how primitive the filmmaking in AGUIRRE was and wanted to do it "up" this time and be more FILMIC with the shots and cinematography.

One of these days I'm gonna try making it thru FITZCARRALDO again.

 

EDIT: I went to the wikipedia page for FITZCARRALDO and see that halfway through the original leading man, JASON ROBARDS JR., became sick and HERZOG found himself saddled with KINSKI HALFWAY THRU production!!!

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I watched The 36 Hours (1964) last night and found that it was one of the least credible WWII espionage films I had ever seen.  

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5 hours ago, Vidor said:

Here's irony: the best film version of "Tess of the d'Urbervilles" was made by *Roman Polanski*.  It's very good.

Except even then he turns it into a rape-survivor drama as his mea culpa to Natassja Kinski, when Thomas Hardy wanted the book to be about navigating the cutthroat English class system.

Still, it is the best...looking version.

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Am I the only one who remembers CHARLIE BROWN having to do a school book report (?) on TESS OF THE D'URBERVILLES in the PEANUTS COMIC STRIP, and if so, holy ****, that is some HEAVY READING CHUCK!

**i swear this appeared in the comic strip sometime in the late 80's or early nineties because it is where I first saw the (distinctive) title.

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ps- not that this is on topic or that anyone asked, but THOMAS HARDY is one of my FAVORITE FAVORITE AUTHORS, and if anyone is looking for some good summer reading, I HIGHLY HIGHLY RECOMMEND two lesser known works of his that are EXQUISITE: THE WOODLANDERS and THE WELL-BELOVED.

FROM time to time I have toyed with the notion of adapting both into scripts (even wrote a good chunk of one before I scrapped the idea)

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34 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ps- not that this is on topic or that anyone asked, but THOMAS HARDY is one of my FAVORITE FAVORITE AUTHORS, and if anyone is looking for some good summer reading, I HIGHLY HIGHLY RECOMMEND two lesser known works of his that are EXQUISITE: THE WOODLANDERS and THE WELL-BELOVED.

FROM time to time I have toyed with the notion of adapting both into scripts (even wrote a good chunk of one before I scrapped the idea)

I love The Woodlanders. A beautiful but heartbreaking book. There has been a film version, which I've seen, but I don't remember much about it. The book remains in my mind, particularly the tragic characters of Giles Winterbourne and Marty South.

MV5BMTI1MzU3NDMwOV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwOTI1

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