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49 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Am I the only one who remembers CHARLIE BROWN having to do a school book report (?) on TESS OF THE D'URBERVILLES in the PEANUTS COMIC STRIP, and if so, holy ****, that is some HEAVY READING CHUCK!

**i swear this appeared in the comic strip sometime in the late 80's or early nineties because it is where I first saw the (distinctive) title.

I am sorry to have to say that your memory is faulty. It is Sally who must do the book report. Charlie Brown is merely attempting to help her. 

https://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/1988/09/04

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ps- not that this is on topic or that anyone asked, but THOMAS HARDY is one of my FAVORITE FAVORITE AUTHORS, and if anyone is looking for some good summer reading, I HIGHLY HIGHLY RECOMMEND two lesser known works of his that are EXQUISITE: THE WOODLANDERS and THE WELL-BELOVED.

FROM time to time I have toyed with the notion of adapting both into scripts (even wrote a good chunk of one before I scrapped the idea)

There are three degrees of separation between you and Thomas Hardy. Kind of. In college I knew a girl who attended a lecture given by a close friend of his. It's a small world after all. 

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23 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

...by the way, I've heard Werner Herzog interviewed, and he sounds like an exceptionally intelligent and nice man .

Werner Herzog is a fan of Harmony Korine and the film Gummo. Herzog particularly loved the bacon taped to the wall above the bathtub:

p19874_i_h9_aa.jpg

Herzog: "What I like about Gummo are the details that one might not notice at first. There's the scene where the kid in the bathtub drops his chocolate bar into the dirty water and just behind him there's a piece of fried bacon stuck to the wall with Scotch tape. This is the entertainment of the future."

https://rohandrape.net/ut/rttcc-text/Herzog1999a.pdf

 

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ps- not that this is on topic or that anyone asked, but THOMAS HARDY is one of my FAVORITE FAVORITE AUTHORS, and if anyone is looking for some good summer reading, I HIGHLY HIGHLY RECOMMEND two lesser known works of his that are EXQUISITE: THE WOODLANDERS and THE WELL-BELOVED.

FROM time to time I have toyed with the notion of adapting both into scripts (even wrote a good chunk of one before I scrapped the idea)

I have the Wooodlanders on my Kindle and still haven't read it.  I read nearly all of Hardy's work for my Master's in English Lit.  He and George Eliot were my specialty.

I believe that Hardy was not only critiquing the English class system, but the double standard of sexual mores.   His novel Jude the Obscure also deals with the hypocrisy of Victorian sexual morals.

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ps- not that this is on topic or that anyone asked, but THOMAS HARDY is one of my FAVORITE FAVORITE AUTHORS, and if anyone is looking for some good summer reading, I HIGHLY HIGHLY RECOMMEND two lesser known works of his that are EXQUISITE: THE WOODLANDERS and THE WELL-BELOVED.

FROM time to time I have toyed with the notion of adapting both into scripts (even wrote a good chunk of one before I scrapped the idea)

I am also a huge fan of both books, and a big fan of Hardy in general.

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40 minutes ago, Swithin said:

Werner Herzog is a fan of Harmony Korine and the film Gummo. Herzog particularly loved the bacon taped to the wall above the bathtub:

p19874_i_h9_aa.jpg

Herzog: "What I like about Gummo are the details that one might not notice at first. There's the scene where the kid in the bathtub drops his chocolate bar into the dirty water and just behind him there's a piece of fried bacon stuck to the wall with Scotch tape. This is the entertainment of the future."

https://rohandrape.net/ut/rttcc-text/Herzog1999a.pdf

 

Right,  Harmony Korine.  I haven't thought about him in ages.  I did see Gummo, when it first came out,  But I can't recall it all that well -- although  for some reason, I do remember that bathtub scene.

A film by Harmony Korine that I remember better, even though I only saw it once,  and a long time ago at that  (well, when it came out, which was a long time ago :  1995)   was Kids.  I remember thinking it was an unpleasant movie, primarily because the main character was so dislikable.  It was about the promiscuity of young people back  when HIV - Aids was very much a thing to be feared  (still is, I guess, although medications have rendered it not quite so fearful), and this horrid young man did not care about HIV or what  the consequences of his sexual predatory activity  might cause.   

But still, it was an unusual and powerful film.  I especially recall Chloe Sevigney in it, it was the first time I saw her.  A moving and sensitive performance.

I'm not surprised  Werner Herzog would be interested in Harmony Korine's work,  Herzog is definitely nothing if not off-beat  (or,  not mainstream - however you want to call it.)

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Am I the only one who remembers CHARLIE BROWN having to do a school book report (?) on TESS OF THE D'URBERVILLES in the PEANUTS COMIC STRIP, and if so, holy ****, that is some HEAVY READING CHUCK!

**i swear this appeared in the comic strip sometime in the late 80's or early nineties because it is where I first saw the (distinctive) title.

Especially since most of the Peanuts gang is supposedly in the second or third grade in the latter strips (they started out as preschoolers).  They've always been a precocious bunch...

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1 hour ago, SansFin said:

I am sorry to have to say that your memory is faulty. It is Sally who must do the book report. Charlie Brown is merely attempting to help her. 

https://www.gocomics.com/peanuts/1988/09/04

OMG!!!!

As much of a fan of TESS OF THE D’URBERVILLES as I am, it’s probably for the best that Sally had Chuck act as Cliffs notes for her. I’d wonder what that ambitious teacher was gonna  assign her ***THIRD GRADE CLASS*** for reading next.
CATCH-22? ATLAS SHRUGGED? VANITY FAIR?

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1 minute ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

OMG!!!!

As much of a fan of TESS OF THE D’URBERVILLES as I am, it’s probably for the best Sally had Chuck act as Cliffs notes for her. I’d wonder what that teacher was gonna  assign her ***THIRD GRADE CLASS*** next.
 

THE PLAGUE? CATCH-22? ATLAS SHRUGGED? 

It's even better than that.  Sally was a couple of years younger than Charlie.  The age difference was much greater when she was introduced in the strip, but by the 1970s, she had closed the gap a bit.   Guess she was a victim of the same disease that prematurely ages soap opera children.

As far as their film tastes go, they talk about and watch Citizen Kane often, another movie high on an eight year old's list of things to watch!

The Peanuts musical (You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown) has the gang doing a book report on Peter Rabbit, which is much more age-appropriate. 

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

OMG!!!!

As much of a fan of TESS OF THE D’URBERVILLES as I am, it’s probably for the best that Sally had Chuck act as Cliffs notes for her. I’d wonder what that ambitious teacher was gonna  assign her ***THIRD GRADE CLASS*** for reading next.
CATCH-22? ATLAS SHRUGGED? VANITY FAIR?

It is slightly worse than that. 

"... she did eventually complete kindergarten and settled in at about first or second grade age for the remainder of the  strip's run."    https://peanuts.fandom.com/wiki/Sally_Brown

It is my guess that she was mostly in first grade. This is because of the age difference between her and her older brother.

"Charlie Brown began in an early strip (November 3, 1950) that he was "only four years old", but he aged over the next two decades, being six years old as of November 17, 1957, and "eight-and-a-half years old" by July 11, 1979. Later references continue to peg Charlie Brown as being approximately eight years old." https://askinglot.com/how-old-are-the-peanuts-kids-supposed-to-be

Her being in first grade and his being in third grade seems appropriate. Please understand that this is simply my conjecture and someone with greater knowledge or a dedication to the comic strip might prove me wrong. 

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3 hours ago, Swithin said:

Werner Herzog is a fan of Harmony Korine and the film Gummo. Herzog particularly loved the bacon taped to the wall above the bathtub

What I remember most about GUMMO is  the "My Little Rooster"  song that played during the opening credits and The Bunny Boy (there's a clip of him playing the accordion while on the toilet but I won't post that one).

Gummo_704.jpg?itok=mK3S3GbX&mtime=139762

"And l love my little guinea, and my guinea loves me.

I'm gonna cherish my guinea ‘neath the green bay tree.

My little guin' goes potarak.

Little duck goes quack quack.

Little pig goes mmm mmm.

Llittle hen goes cluck cluck.

Little rooster goes c-o-c-k-a-doodle-doo

Doodle-doo doodle-doo."

 

I first saw GUMMO about 10 years ago and enjoyed it. 

Someone on these message boards started a thread about GUMMO a few years ago and I think I might have been the only contributor to it besides the thread's creator,

 

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17 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

A film by Harmony Korine that I remember better, even though I only saw it once,  and a long time ago at that  (well, when it came out, which was a long time ago :  1995)   was Kids.  I remember thinking it was an unpleasant movie, primarily because the main character was so dislikable.  It was about the promiscuity of young people back  when HIV - Aids was very much a thing to be feared  (still is, I guess, although medications have rendered it not quite so fearful), and this horrid young man did not care about HIV or what  the consequences of his sexual predatory activity  might cause.   

Yes, KIDS is a very powerful --- and very disturbing film ---  that chronicles the experiences of a group of New York City teenagers during a single day. And sexual promiscuity figures prominently in their story. 

You may already know this, misswonderly, but Harmony Korine wrote the screenplay for KIDS, but the movie was directed by Larry Clark.

Although some viewers believed (believe) the movie  was largely improvised, Harmony Kormine has said the movie was entirely scripted except for the scene at the end when Casper wakes up on the couch and says "Jesus Christ, what happened?"    ******* SPOLIERS BELOW**********

*********************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

. . . after unknowingly the night before exposing himself to HIV by having sex  with (or more accurately  r a p i n g) a girl passed out on the couch, who  had tested HIV positive earlier that day.

 

 

 

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On 5/29/2021 at 11:48 AM, rosebette said:

I watched the James Whale version of Waterloo Bridge (1931) on TCM On Demand last night.  I had seen it once a few years back, but with This version is far superior to the cleaned-up MGM version. Mae Clarke was a revelation, an earthy, natural actress, and it's sad that she ended up being typecast as gangster's molls at Warner's.    Her acting style  reminded me a bit of a young Barbara Stanywk.  Kent Douglass (aka Douglass Montgomery) was also exceptional, despite the heavy eyeliner (I know very blonde actors often had to wear that for their eyes to photograph).  The scene where he is in tears, barking at the landlady, got me choked up.  His naivete and earnestness are a lot more believable than the wooden Robert Taylor in the remake.  In the 1931 version, there was a naturalness and intensity in both leads' performances, very un-Hollywood.  I also loved how Whale "opened up" the story in the air raid scenes.

I love the 1931 WATERLOO BRIDGE and much prefer it to the later "more Hollywood" version from 1940.  The 1931 version directed by James Whale  is 90 years old (!)  but still seems fresh and, well, real while the the later version is just a Hollywood movie.

I re-watched the James Whale version again today based on your post and once again I was amazed by the scene where Mae Clarke and Kent Douglass have their first conversation in her apartment (after they met while helping the Cockney woman gather the potatoes she dropped during the zeppelin raid).  And  the look on Mae Clark's face in the mirror as she prepares to go back to work on the streets after Kent Douglass has left!

Like you, I was moved  by the scene where the tearful  Kent Douglass screamed at Mae Clark's landlady.

93dc0a76602f452284846d5ea836d0d3.jpg

mae1-gif.3069121

MHIFAZY.jpg

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9 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

I first saw GUMMO about 10 years ago and enjoyed it. 

Someone on these message boards started a thread about GUMMO a few years ago and I think I might have been the only contributor to it besides the thread's creator,

Just looked back on that thread (which I started), and yes, you were the only other poster. In the past, whenever I posted about Gummo, Lawrence would groan, but he doesn't come around much any more.

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12 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

I love the 1931 WATERLOO BRIDGE and much prefer it to the later "more Hollywood" version from 1940.  The 1931 version directed by James Whale  is 90 years old (!)  but still seems fresh and, well, real while the the later version is just a Hollywood movie. I re-watched the James Whale version again today based on your post and once again I was amazed by the scene where Mae Clarke and Kent Douglass have their first conversation in her apartment (after they met while helping the Cockney woman gather the potatoes she dropped during the zeppelin raid). 

 

for me, it's a genuine tie. both versions have weak (*in more than one sense of the word) performances from the leading men, but everything else works so well, even in spite of the fact that they have to tiptoe all around what's really going on in the 1940 version. Also, forgive me, MAE CLARKE is excellent, but I BOW AT THE ALTAR of VIVIEN LEIGH.

Nothing ruins a day more than dropping your potatoes during a zeppelin raid. I just hate hate haaaaaate when that happens. [in all seriousness, I did not know that BRITAIN endured bombing in the first World War as well until I saw the original WATERLOO BRIDGE.)

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5 hours ago, Swithin said:

Just looked back on that thread (which I started), and yes, you were the only other poster. In the past, whenever I posted about Gummo, Lawrence would groan, but he doesn't come around much any more.

In his memory, I will groan.

(ahem) ugghhhhhh

But I will be quick to follow up that groan with the fact that you are COMPLETELY allowed to like what you like and I salute you for it.

(in fact, all the moreso for going against the tide on GUMMO.)

uGGGHHH.....Spaghetti-Os......

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16 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

It's even better than that.  Sally was a couple of years younger than Charlie.  The age difference was much greater when she was introduced in the strip, but by the 1970s, she had closed the gap a bit.   Guess she was a victim of the same disease that prematurely ages soap opera children.

As far as their film tastes go, they talk about and watch Citizen Kane often, another movie high on an eight year old's list of things to watch!

The Peanuts musical (You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown) has the gang doing a book report on Peter Rabbit, which is much more age-appropriate. 

 

15 hours ago, SansFin said:

It is slightly worse than that. 

"... she did eventually complete kindergarten and settled in at about first or second grade age for the remainder of the  strip's run."    https://peanuts.fandom.com/wiki/Sally_Brown

It is my guess that she was mostly in first grade. This is because of the age difference between her and her older brother.

"Charlie Brown began in an early strip (November 3, 1950) that he was "only four years old", but he aged over the next two decades, being six years old as of November 17, 1957, and "eight-and-a-half years old" by July 11, 1979. Later references continue to peg Charlie Brown as being approximately eight years old." https://askinglot.com/how-old-are-the-peanuts-kids-supposed-to-be

Her being in first grade and his being in third grade seems appropriate. Please understand that this is simply my conjecture and someone with greater knowledge or a dedication to the comic strip might prove me wrong. 

maybe SALLY went to a different school....

Maggie Simpson Visits the Ayn Rand School for Tots | Josh Blackman's Blog

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50 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

"For story time today. children, I will be reading aloud from the work NO EXIT by JEAN-PAUL SARTRE in which he teaches the invaluable lesson that HELL is, in fact, other people..."

Children can be very quick learners. A week in an Internet forum will teach them that Sartre was an optimist.

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20 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Am I the only one who remembers CHARLIE BROWN having to do a school book report (?) on TESS OF THE D'URBERVILLES in the PEANUTS COMIC STRIP, and if so, holy ****, that is some HEAVY READING CHUCK!

**i swear this appeared in the comic strip sometime in the late 80's or early nineties because it is where I first saw the (distinctive) title.

I do recall one of the animated TV specials in the 80s where Charlie Brown had to read War and Peace for a book report, but he kept falling asleep almost as soon as he opened the book.....which was almost as large as he was.

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18 hours ago, rosebette said:

I have the Wooodlanders on my Kindle and still haven't read it.  I read nearly all of Hardy's work for my Master's in English Lit.  He and George Eliot were my specialty.

I believe that Hardy was not only critiquing the English class system, but the double standard of sexual mores.   His novel Jude the Obscure also deals with the hypocrisy of Victorian sexual morals.

 

18 hours ago, kingrat said:

I am also a huge fan of both books, and a big fan of Hardy in general.

my aborted screenplay adaptation of THE WOODLANDERS moved the time and place to WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA in the early 1950's, in fact I think I made one of the characters a Korean War vet...? It was a long time ago and I decided not to continue with adapting it as THE LYNCHPIN of the story is A SHOCKING TWIST that happens in the last act of the story, and I could totally  see said twist  happening in 1890, but not entirely in 1952. nonetheless, it is a GORGEOUS STORY and the ending will blow you away. it was HARDY'S FAVORITE among his own works. (doing  a modern update of THOMAS HARDY is nothing new by the way, there is a film called THE HI-LO COUNTRY that is a western retelling of FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD)

THE WELL-BELOVED is about an arrogant, well-to-do artist visiting an isolated English village. There, he meets a beautiful girl named AVICE (one of HArdy's best character names) He romances her, then decides she isn't good enough and leaves ("ghosting" her as the kids say nowadays). she marries a village man, has his child (a daughter named AVICE) and DIES.  In the ensuing years, the ARTIST returns and falls in love with THE SECOND AVICE and then YEARS LATER, he falls in love with her daughter, a THIRD AVICE. It's a really rich story and it borders on being supernatural...which to be honest with you, is something i would gladly explore were i to ever decide to write an adaptation of it.

(BTW, I am also a fan of GEORGE ELIOT and have had moments where I considered doing an update of ADAM BEDE in a similar manner_)

 

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**IRONICALLY, all the kids in A CHRISTMAS STORY (1984) audibly GROAN at the mention of reading SILAS MARNER by GEORGE ELIOT for their class, but I think it is a marvelous little novel, the one thing that ELIOT wrote that is not too high fallutin to make it digestible to everyone, in fact, I think it would actually be a great reading assignment for a grade school class.

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16 hours ago, HoldenIsHere said:

What I remember most about GUMMO is  the "My Little Rooster"  song that played during the opening credits and The Bunny Boy (there's a clip of him playing the accordion while on the toilet but I won't post that one).

Gummo_704.jpg?itok=mK3S3GbX&mtime=139762

 

 

 

Would had been more appealing if he dressed like this.

a7bfe129909e9477cceedc2aaf9355a2.jpg

:P

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